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Accession  JVo. 


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F 

I 


MARTIN  KELLY  TALKS  OF  ABE  RUEF 


Vol.  XX.    No.  1036 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  JULY  6,  1912 


PRICE,  10  CENTS 


Country  Life  the  Year  Around — It's  Not 
Expensive — It  Means  Everything  to  the 
Wife  and  Children — Learn  About  the 


Burlingame  Foothills " 


Where 


The  Businessman's  Desk 

Home  Less  than  an  Hour  Apart 

— Twenty-five  minutes  from 
the  Third  and  Townsend 
Depot. 

— Interurban  service  from 
Market  and  Fifth  streets. 

— Forty-five  minutes  by  au- 
tomobile. 

— No  Fogs — No  Ferries. 
— Postoffice  and  Wells  Fargo 
on  tract. 

— Primary  school  in  center  of 
land. 

— Fire  and  police  protection. 


Everything  Good  from 
the  City  Linked  with  the 
PI  easures  of  Real 
Country  Life 


ONE 
LOOK 
MEANS 
A  LOT 


"  It'«  Cheaper  to  Become  Your  Own 
Landlord  than  to  Remain  a  Tenant." 

The  First  Tract  South  of  San  Francisco 
with  Building  Restrictions. 

Nearly  Two  Hundred  Houses  Erected. 

Monthly  Payments  if  Desired. 


The  foys  of  the  Open  Country 
With  Most  of  the  City's  Comfort 

— You  want  open  fields,  gar- 
dens, chickens,  clean  clear 
air,  quiet  restful  nights. 

---You  want  other  things  too. 

—Cement  sidewalks  in  winter, 

'  .•ist5efet..*lights,  sewers,  elec- 
•  •  •  •  «  • 

'*  tficfty,  gas,  shade  trees. 
— You  want  pure  water  at  a 
low  rate. 

— You'd  like  daily  free  deliv- 
eries by  the  larger  city 
stores. 


AllTheseThingsYou'll 
Have  with  the  Country, 
If  You  Live  in  the 
"Burlingame  Foothills" 


225  Mills  Building 
San  Francisco 


OFFICE  OF  EASTON  ESTATE 


225  Mills  Building 
San  Francisco 


Leading'  Hotels  and  Resorts 


TO 

^0 


IN  THE  GOOD  OLD  SUMMER  TIME 

we  want  you  at 

Hotel  Del  Monte  or  Pacific  Grove  Hotel 

where  we  have  the  most  glorious  climate  on  the  coast;  never  a  hot 
day.  Here  you  can  Golf,  Motor,  Ride,  Swim,  and  Fish  with  perfect 
comfort. 

OUR  GOLF  COURSE 

is  now  pronounced  the  best  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  and  equal  to  any  in 
the  Eastern  States.     Write  for  rates  and  literature  to 

H.  R.  WARNER,  Del  Monte,  California 


H    I    CORONADO  BEACI?yeALkf"ORNIA"\^:l 

cy  (      j'k  m 


/""ORONADO'S  excellent  winter  climate  is  sur- 
^  passrd  only  by  its  superb  Summer.  Open  the 
year  round  this  famous  hotel  is  the  mecca  of  tour- 
ists from  every  State  Golf.  Tennis.  Bay  and  Surf 
Bathing  are  among  the  many  attractions.  Sta 
fishing  bcUcT  than  tvtr  before.  New  Sail  and  Fishing 
Boats.     Write  for  booklet. 

H.  W.  Wills,  Manager,  Coronad*,  CaJ.  or 
H.  F.  Norcroij,  AsL.  334  So.  Sprini  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Cil 


CLIFF  HOUSE 

SAN    FRANCISCO'S    MOST   FAMOUS  RESORT; 

Unsurpassed  Cuisine 

(a    la    carte    service)        \*  *,  < 

Dancing  in  Ball  Room  Every  E>vrtifh^  *  • 
Private  Banquet  and  Dining  Rooms 
Friday  Fish  Dinner 

(table  d'hote) 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Entertainment 


PARAISO 

HOT  SPRINGS 

Grandest   and   Most  Accessible. 
California's  Real  Paradise 

Only  four  hours  from  San  Francisco.  Wonderful 
natural  hot  soda  and  sulphur;  guaranteed  for 
rheumatism,  liver,  kidney  and  malaria,  all  stomach 
troubles.  Expert  masseurs.  Rates  $12  to  $16,  in- 
cluding baths.  Round  trip,  $6.35,  including  auto. 
Autos  running  daily.  Leave  Third  and  Townsend 
7  a.  m.  and  4  p.  m.  Booklets  Peck-Judah,  687 
Market  street. 

H.  H.  McGOWAN,  Proprietor  and  Manager. 
Paraiso  Springs,  Monterey  County 


CASA  DEL  REY 


New  3(X)-room,  fire-proof  hotel 
located  near  the  beach 
and  Casino. 


OPEN  ALL  YEAR  ROUND 
AMERICAN  PLAN 


Tennis  Courts,  Good  Boating, 
Bathing  and  Fishing.  Numer- 
ous drives  along  the  Coast 
and  through  the  Mountains. 

SUPERIOR  GOLFING 


Santa  Cruz  Beach  Hotel  Co. 


CRAGS  FARM 

;  :    '.':'ry?^^*.MT.  shasta 

' CanTtrhfa's*  Most  Delightful  Mountain 
Resort 

Real  pine  log  cabins,  with  great  stone 
fireplaces;  hot  and  cold  shower  baths;  elec- 
tric lights;  fine  table  with  home  cooking. 


HOTEL  VICTORIA 

COR.  BUSH  AND  STOCKTON  STS. 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

A  downtown  residence  hotel  of  the  high- 
est order,  appealing  particularly  to  those 
who  value  comfort  and  convenience  more 
than  mere  ostentation  and  who  appreciate 
excellence  of  cuisine  and  service  at  mod- 
erate expense. 

American  Plan,  from  $3.00  per  day  up 
European  Plan,  from  $1.B0  per  day  up 

For  rates  and  reservations  address 

MRS.  W.  F.  MORRIS 

Proprietor 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


HOTEL  ST.  FRANCIS 


Turkish  Baths 

12th  Floor 
Ladies  Hciir  Dressing  Parlors 

2d  Floor 
Cafe 

White  and  Gold  Restaurant 

Lobby  Floor 
Electric  Grill 
Barber  Shop 

Basement,  Geary  St.  entrance 

Under  the  Management  of  James  Woods 


PALACE  HOTEL 

Situated  on  Market  Street 
In  the  Center  of  the  City 

Take  Any  Market  Street  Car  frorn  the  Ferry 

FAIRMONT  HOTEL 

Tlie  Most  Beautifully  Situated  of  .Any  City 
Hotel  in  the  World 

Take  Sacramento  Street  Cars  from  the  Ferry 

TWO  GREAT  HOTELS 
LNDER  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF  THE 
PALACE  HOTEL  COMPANY 


Hotel  Rowardennan 


BEN  LOMOND.  CAL. 


In  the  Mountains  by  the  Sea 
Open  All  Year  Round 
Under   New  Management 
Rates  $17.50  to  $25.00  per  Week 
Excellent  Cuisine  and  Service 
Automobile   parties   will   find   this  resort 
place   to    stop    at.     Fishing    season    now    open.  For 
information  and  booklet,  address, 

J.  M.  SHOULTS 

Ben   Lomond,  Cal. 

Or  the  Peck-Judah  Co.,  San  Francisco. 


good 


Golf,  Bathe  and  Rest  at 

Paso  Robles  Hot  Springs 

Five  Hours  from  San  Francisco 


WILLOW  RANCH 

REDWOOD  HEIGHTS— Grandest  view  of  the 
Santa  Cruz  Mountains;  overlooking  ocean  and  beach. 
Delightfully  located  in  the  Redwoods,  5  miles  from 
Santa  Cruz.  Spring  water.  Excellent  table,  bath 
houses,  swimming  pool,  dance  pavilion,  hunting  and 
fishing.  Splendid  auto  service  free.  Daily  mail. 
Phone  Santa  Cruz  8  J  13.    $8.00  per  week. 

MRS.  M.  J.  CRANDELL, 
Santa  Cruz.  Cal. 


GILROY  HOT  SPRINGS 

SANTA  CLARA  CO. 

Most  favorably  noted  for  its  health-healing  waters, 
ideal  climate,  grand  mountain  scenery  and  first-class 
table. 

Only    four   hours   from   San    Francisco,  including 
delightful  stage  ride  over  the  best  kept  mountain  road 
in  California.    Hunting  and  trout  fishing.    Send  for 
booklet  or   see   Peck-Judah.   687   Market  street. 
W.  J.  McDonald.  Proprietor 


Vol.  XX. 


TOWN  TALK 

THE   PACIFIC  WEEKLY 


San  Francisco,  July  6,  1912 


No.  1037 


4 


TOWN  TALK 

Published  Weekly  by 
PACIFIC  PUBLICATION  COMPANY  (Inc.) 
88  First  Street,  San  Francisco 
Phone  Douglas  2612 

Theodore   F.    Bonnet  Editor 

Chas.  W.  Raymond  Business  Manager 

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Foreign  subscriptions  (countries  in  Postal  Union),  $5.00 
per  year.    For  sale  by  all  Newsdealers. 

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The  trade  supplied  direct  by  us. 

For  foreign  and  local  advertising  rates  address  88  First 
street,  San  Francisco. 

New  York  office,  37-39  East  Twenty-eighth  street.  Frederic 
M.   Krugler,  representative. 

Los   Angeles   office,   432    South    Main  street. 


The  Expected 

It  was  in  the  power  of  the  Baltimore  con- 
vention to  conserve  and  promote  the  inter- 
ests of  President  Taft,  and  the  President  is 
now  under  profound  oblitjations  to  that  hite, 
unlamented  body.  What  the  followers  of 
Jefferson  and  Jackson  and  Bryan  did  at 
Baltimore  was  what  might  have  been  ex- 
pected. They  have  a  happy  talent  for  doing 
the  wrong  thing  at  the  psychological  mo- 
ment. It  was  in  the  exercise  of  this  talent 
that  they  nominated  the  flexible  pedant  who 
pleads  in  vindication  of  his  self-stultification 
that  he  taught  "bosh"  for  twenty  years  at 
Princeton.  With  Professor  Wilson  as  the 
Democratic  standard-bearer  and  President 
Taft  as  the  leader  of  the  Republican  hosts 
the  issues  are  as  clear  and  distinct  as  in 
each  of  the  campaigns  when  Bryan  was  try- 
ing to  break  into  the  White  House.  In  the 
circumstances  it  is  naturally  to  be  hoped  by 
all  good  and  loyal  Republicans  that  the 
third-party  movement  will  not  peter  out  and 
that  the  Colonel  will  personally  conduct  the 
forlorn  hope.  With  the  Colonel  and  the 
Professor  as  competitors  in  the  three-cor- 
nered race,  there  is  bound  to  be  something 
of  bewilderment  among  Progressives  and  a 
clear  apprehension  of  the  "lay  of  the  land" 
on  the  part  of  conservatives.  Of  course  it 
may  be  that  the  country  has  gone  crazy,  but 
even  the  insane  ha\e  lucid  intervals. 


The  Kindness  of  Nature 

Notwithstanding  our  politicians,  in  despite 
their  most  strenuous  efforts  to  derange  busi- 
ness and  dislocate  our  whole  commercial 
system,  the  signs  of  prosperity  are  multiply- 
ing. Thus  far  the  resources  of  the  countiy 
are  beyond  the  blighting  influence  of  the 
men  who  are  said  to  be  able  to  circumvent 
the  devil.  The  farmer  everywhere  sees 
good  times  ahead.  Our  captains  of  industry 
view  with  elation  the  growing  demand  for 
copper  and  iron.  There  is  comfort  for  all 
in  the  building  figures  for  May,  which  are 
seventeen  millions  above  last  year;  and  ma- 
terial men  are  cheerful  over  the  prospect  of 
the  spending  shortly  of  a  few  hundred  mil- 
lions in  subways.  There  is  much  reason  for 
us  to  felicitate  ourselves.  Nature  is  exceed- 
ingly kind  to  us.  It  is  doing  its  best  to  make 
us  happy,  and,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  the 
gloom  of  the  politicians  is  wholly  subjective. 
Indeed,  the  unrest  that  is  everywhere  is 
nothing  more  than  a  psychological  phenom- 
enon.   Business  is  brisk,  the  industries  are 


TOWN  TALK 

abnormally  active;  but,  alas!  the  politician 
also.  Our  only  calamity  is  the  politician, 
whose  roar  is  portentous.  Of  him  we  should 
be  apprehensive.  It  would  be  well  for  pub- 
lic opinion  to  apply  the  curb  where  it  would 
do  the  most  good. 

The  Baltimore  Convention 

It  would  need  the  singer  of  the  battle  of 
the  frogs  and  mice  to  do  justice  to  the 
tragi-comedy  that  had  its  beginning  in  the 
beautiful  city  of  Baltimore  last  week.  A 
spirited  performance  throughout  was  the 
spectacular  show  pulled  off  by  the  Democ- 
racy. The  elements  of  tragedy  and  comedy 
were  nicely  mingled.  How  tragic  the  futile 
efforts  of  the  delegates  to  promote  the  feel- 
ing of  brotherly  love  and  make  harmonious 
their  big  pow-wow !  How  comic  the  slap- 
stick antics  of  Big  Bill,  the  thunder-mouth 
from  Nebraska  who  played  the  part  of  the 
death's-head  at  the  feast !  It  was  at  once 
tragic  and  comic,  the  conflict  between  the 
spoiled  darling  of  his  patient  party  and  his 
timid  but  somewhat  recalcitrant  disciples. 
No  longer  disposed  to  follow  the  perennial 
candidate  to  inevitable  defeat,  yet  from 
motives  of  expediency  eager  to  placate  him 
without  sacrificing  every  vestige  of  their 
self-respect,  their  situation  was  at  once 
pitiful  and  laughable.  As  to  the  underlying 
motif  of  the  piece  it  was  truly  dramatic. 
There  was  the  old  reliable  Doctor  of 
Democracy,  bland  and  plausible,  with  but 
one  object  in  view,  and  that  unattainable. 
There  were  the  delegates,  eager  to  con- 
ciliate, but  opposed  to  the  only  means  of 
conciliation.  And  so  the  conflict  raged. 
Baffled  of  his  cherished  purpose  the  old 
Doctor,  who  so  long  has  filled  the  nation 
with  the  odor  of  his  sanctity  while  countless 
thousands  basked  in  his  beams  and  fed  on 
his  wisdom,  bestrode  the  convention  like 
some  giant  spectre  of  the  Brocken — awful, 
mysterious,  desolating.  The  great  heart  of 
fire  that  for  sixteen  years  has  burned  with 
sympathy  for  the  dear  people,  on  this  occa- 
sion reeked  with  impotent  envy  and  malice. 
No  harmony  for  him.  Nothing  .so  inspiring 
to  him  as  the  jangling  note  of  discord  as  os- 
tentatiously he  washed  his  hands  of  imper- 
fections before  the  glass  of  his  vanity,  im- 
pugning the  while  the  motives  of  the  whole 
assemblage  and  challenging  them  to  give 
token  of  their  honesty  by  canting  professions 
that  only  an  accomplished  and  ingenious 
mc^untebank  could  conceive.  If  the  old  Doc- 
tor did  not  get  what  he  wanted  at  Baltimore, 
it  was  nevertheless  most  gratifying  to  his 
spleen  to  see  the  delegates  eating  out  of  his 
hands.  This  of  course  they  did  with  consid- 
erable reluctance,  and  they  are  not  much  to 
blame  for  their  servility.  They  merely 
bowed  to  the  genius  of  democracy  which 
demands  for  its  heroes,  however  contempt- 
ible, worship,  adulation,  obedience.  Bryan 
at  Baltimore  was  the  Robespierre  of  his 
party.  If  he  was  more  moderate  in  his  de- 
crees than  the  bloody  leader  of  the  Jacobins 
it  was  only  because  of  a  difference  in  the 
temperature  of  their  respective  times. 

Our  Politicians 

After  all,  the  people  are  enraptured  by 


July  6,  1912 

it, — the  kind  of  spectacle  the  job-chasing 
politicians  furnished  in  Chicago  and  again  in 
Baltimore.  The  people  are  proud  of  their 
politicians ;  believe  in  them ;  look  up  to 
them ;  yield  their  emotions  to  them.  The 
heavy  moral  artillery  and  detonating  in- 
vective of  the  political  convention  are  music 
to  the  soul  of  the  ravished  multitude.  Per- 
haps we  ought  to  find  consolation  in  the  re- 
flection that  the  attitude  of  the  people  to- 
ward their  politicians  bespeaks  the  optimism 
of  democracy.  But  unfortunately  the  peo- 
ple are  more  than  optimistic;  they  are  en- 
thusiastic. If  they  were  only  complaisant 
the  aspect  of  affairs  would  not  be  so  dis- 
couraging. It  is  bad  enough  to  tolerate  the 
spirit  and  manners  and  methods  of  our 
politicians.  It  is  worse  to  approve  and  ap- 
])Iaud.  The  politicians  are  our  parasites 
and  we  treat  them  as  though  they  were  our 
gods.  When  they  get  together  to  intrigue, 
to  invent  schemes  of  imposture  in  the  sight 
of  men,  we  view  them  as  mere  mortals 
might  view  the  performances  of  the  deities 
on  Olympus,  as  though  it  were  not  for  us  to 
be  shocked  by  the  doings  of  beings  so  far 
above  the  levels  of  puny  mankind.  It  ought 
to  be  irritating  and  disquieting  to  men  of  in- 
telligence to  ponder  their  eminent  politicians 
in  convention  assembled.  \\'hat  a  brazen 
and  brutal  lot  these  politicians  are!  W^hat 
a  commentary  on  the  mentality  of  the  peo- 
ple that  such  scum  should  ever  have  come 
to  the  surface !  Take  them  by  and  large — 
what  are  they?  It  is  fair  to  judge  them  by 
one  of  the  loftiest  standards  among  them — 
the  standard  incarnated  in  the  person  of  the 
Hon.  William  Jennings  Bryan,  who  for 
nearly  two  decades  has  dominated  the  party 
of  the  plain  people.  Bryan  is  the  Peerless 
One  of  Democracy — peerless  among  patriots. 
.Active  in  public  life  for  nearly  a  quarter  of 
a  century,  there  is  not  to  his  credit  a  single 
achievement  on  which  to  base  a  claim  to  the 
gratitude  of  his  countrymen.  The  apostle 
of  free  silver,  the  apologi.st  of  Debs  during 
the  great  railway  strike,  the  compounder  of 
c|uack  remedies  for  every  ill  the  body  politic 
is  heir  to,  this  perennial  idol  of  the  masses 
has  not  a  single  quality  of  mind  or  heart  to 
vindicate  his  pretensions  or  warrant  his  as- 
pirations. We  saw  Mr.  Bryan  in  action  in 
Paltimore.  and  what  a  figure  did  he  cut!  It 
was  Partisanship  on  its  legs  in  bitter  mood, 
making  insulting  imputations.  How  char- 
acteristic of  the  eminent  politician  of  the 
day!  .A  vested  interest  in  calumny  is  the 
only  vested  interest  that  our  distinguished 
demagogues  will  acknowledge.  Their's  is 
always  a  beatific  bias.  They  prove  their 
own  honesty  by  impugning  the  honesty  of 
their  opponents.  The  soundness  of  their 
principles  is  demonstrated  not  by  logic  but 
by  wholesale  vilification  of  dissenters.  Now 
a  high  order  of  character  cannot  coexist 
with  an  habitual  inclination  to  calumny. 
The  man  who  never  scruples  at  traducing 
his  opponents  must  necessarily  pass  many 
false  judgments  and  be  guilty  of  many 
brutalities  and  cruelties,  and  his  rage  is  not 
to  be  justified  by  persuasion  of  superiority 
of  motive.  The  politician  who  goes  about 
blasting  reputations  has  not  convinced  him- 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


5 


self  that  he  is  the  civil  arm  of  a  spiritual 
power.  He  is  just  a  ruthless  job-chaser 
with  his  own  sordid,  selfish  purposes  in 
view,  and  nobody  knows  it  better  than  him- 
self. In  Chicago,  and  again  in  Baltimore, 
how  conspicuous  and  noisy  were  the  politi- 
cians of  the  Bryan  type.  They  were  the 
whole  show  in  both  cities,  and  though  not 
always  triumphant,  their  opponents  they 
filled  with  apprehension,  and  the  paramount 
problem  was  how  to  placate  and  conciliate 
them.  It  inclines  one  to  the  mood  pessim- 
istic to  consider  the  doings  of  our  politicians 
— their  huckstering  and  trimming,  their  in- 
triguing and  scheming — and  reflect  that  they 
have  presumed  to  take  to  themselves  the 
task  of  improving  the  morals  of  the  man  who 
is  not  in  politics  and  directing  the  destinies 
of  the  nation. 


A  Propaganda  Against  Ragtime 

Considering  the  volume  of  lofty  moral 
enthusiasm  in  this  country  how  strange 
that  the  devil  should  anywhere  have  a  foot- 
hold !  This  is  an  age  of  rampant  and 
riotous  reform.  With  uplift  movements  of 
daily  inception,  wickedness  abolished  every 
month  in  the  magazines,  prophets  of  public 
righteousness  qualifying  for  salvation  in  all 
sections  of  the  country,  the  Money  Devil 
on  the  run,  all  the  frontiers  of  morality  oc- 
cupied by  vigilance  committees  ready  to  ap- 
ply lynch  law  wherever  there  is  a  manifesta- 
tion of  the  disposition  that  entered  into  our 
composition  with  the  primeval  Adam  ;  with 
so  much  holy  zeal  in  action,  with  so  many 
earnest,  single-hearted  souls  rushing  up 
and  down  the  land  intent  on  regenerating 
the  species,  vice  must  be  fast  vanishing  from 
this  venerable  world,  Satan  must  realize  that 
he  is  losing  his  grip.  Were  it  not  for  rag- 
time we  should  be  convinced  that  the  Sons 
of  Belial  had  been  dispersed  and  driven 
from  the  land.  And  of  ragtime  we  should 
not  have  been  mindful  had  it  not  been  for 
the  organization  in  New  York  the  other  day 
of  a  propaganda  against  what  has  been  pro- 
nounced the  "rythmically  attractive  degen- 
erator."  Ragtime  is  "vulgarizing  the  young 
and  undermining  our  respect  for  sacred 
things."  So  say  the  propagandists,  and 
to  prove  it  they  quote : 

"Who  are  you  with  tonight,  tonight. 
Who  are  you  with  tonight? 
Will  you  tell  your  wife  in  the  morning 
Who  you  were  with  tonight?" 

Abominable  trash !  And  there  is  much 
worse.  For  example,  a  song  entitled  'T 
Want  One  Like  Pa  Had  Yesterday" ;  an- 
other entitled  "Can't  a  Man  Love  More 
Than  One?";  another  with  this  refrain: 

"I  can  see  that  you  are  married. 
And  you  know  I'm  married  too, 
And  nobody  knows  that  you  know  me. 
And  nobody  knows  that  I  know  you. 
If  you  care  to  we'll  have  luncheon  every 

day  here  just  the  same, 
But,  sweetheart,  if  you  talk  in  your  sleep 

please  don't  mention  my  name." 

The  sentiments  of  these  songs  are  bad 
enough  from  the  moral  standpoint,  but  how 
they  must  jar  the  soul  of  the  purist!  It  is 
not  to  be  gainsaid  that  the  writing  and  sing- 


ing of  them  should  be  discouraged.  There 
is  this  to  be  said  however:  that  our  song 
writers  are  not  makers  of  public  sentiment 
and  public  feeling.  Songs  have  had  a  great 
influence  in  the  world;  and  though  there 
was  shrewdness  in  the  philosophy  of  the 
man  who  said  he  didn't  care  wdio  made  the 
laws  of  the  country  so  long  as  he  wrote 
the  songs,  he  was  certainly  not  thinking  of 
vulgar  ragtime.  As  songs  inspire  the  peo- 
ple so  also  do  the  people  inspire  song- 
sters. In  the  songs  of  a  people  are 
reflected  the  manners  and  thoughts  and 
morals  of  the  day.  Our  songs  grow  out  of 
the  condition  of  modern  modishness.  Con- 
sequently it  is  hard  to  believe  that  all  rag- 
time is  vulgar.  Indeed  it  must  be  that  very 
little  of  it  is  vulgar,  since  the  popular  song 
is  sensitive  to  the  ambient  hour.  It  stands 
to  reason  that  the  great  bulk  of  our  pop- 
ular songs  reflect  the  sublime  purity  of  our 
politics,  the  exalted  ideals  of  our  society, 
the  delicacy  and  discrimination  of  our  daily 
press,  the  universal  respect  for  learning,  the 
general  indifiference  to  the  mere  material. 
As  our  song  writers  cannot  be  insensate  to 
social  influences,  it  follows  that  our  stub- 
born probity  and  our  reverence  for  the  mar- 
riage tie  inust  find  esthetic  expression  in 
the  popular  lyrics  of  the  day.  The  prop- 
agandists against  ragtime  are  simple-minded 
folk.  They  are  making  war  on  windmills. 
Mistaking  effect  for  cause  they  are  im- 
pugning the  fundamentals  of  our  high-toned 
civilization. 


A  Mere  Convention 

All  the  worlds  are  but  stages  in  evolution, 
and  this  world  of  man,  the  civilized  part 
thereof  we  swear  by,  but  a  woman's  con- 
vention. What  a  week  of  women  and  song 
we've  had — enough  to  drive  a  man  to  the 
third  of  the  great  trio!  It  began  by  such 
a  weeping  of  the  All-mother  as  the  skies  of 
California  have  not  seen  in  many  a  long 
June  day.  Why  these  unprecedented  tears, 
whether  for  our  (men's)  sins,  or  over  what 
we've  come  to  politically,  or  to  remind  us 
that  it  never  rains  reform  but  it  bores,  we 
know  not.  Not  possibly  could  California, 
the  personification  of  lovely  smiling  woman- 
kind have  wept  so  on  account  of  woman- 
cruel,  that  kills  with  one  stone  heart  nest- 
ing white  sister  of  the  stork  and  nestlings, 
and  flaunts  the  resulting  aigrette — a  feather 
in  her  cap?  True,  when  woman  dresses  up 
to  kill — or  down — she  aims  but  to  be  stun- 
ning. None  knows  that  better  than  poor 
nurse-proud  man.  If  she  succeed  in  being 
but  killingly  funny,  whose  fault  is  it?  The 
fault  of  the  more  deadly  manufacturing 
male  that  for  his  own  personal  and  pecun- 
iary ends  subsidizes  Dame  Fashion?  That 
we  are  coming  to  the  pannier  skirt  we  men 
have  ourselves  to  thank.  We  had  altnost 
said  wee  men,  so  insignificant  we  felt  by 
the  time  the  lady  from  Illinois  had  reduced 
us  to  her  dress  standard.  Woman,  self- 
anotheosized,  was  become  a  brobdingnagian 
thing  in  panniers,  with  pockets,  and  a  lil- 
liput  husband  in  either  pocket,  like  the 
monstrous  suffragette  beastie  of  which 
science  tells  us.  Heaven  forfend  the  vision 
be  prophetic !    To  such  a  pretty  pass  are  we 


come,  now  face  to  face  with  Woman.  One 
word  was  indeed  said  ripping  woman  up  the 
back  in  behalf  of  him  who  buttons  her  up, 
and  says  things  behind  her,  a  word  calling 
for  and  forth  more  laughter  than  applause. 
The  consensus  of  opinion  was  one  with 
Sancho  Panza's  that  soft  words  butter  no 
parsnips.  Few  women  seem  left  us  who 
know  well  enough  on  which  side  their 
bread  is  buttered  to  speak  the  butterer 
softly,  gently,  and  lowly,  a  most  excellent 
thing.  The  women  had  lots  to  say  for 
themselves,  little  for  us.  They  spoke  of 
woman,  for  woman,  to  woman,  at  man.  We 
men  had  left  undone  those  things  which  we 
ought  to  have  done ;  and  we  had  done  those 
things  which  we  ought  not  to  have  done ; 
and  there  was  no  health  in  us.  We  were 
convicted  by  our  peerless  jury  of  committed 
sins  and  omitted  many  and  grievous,  and 
they  had  the  courage  of  their  convictions, 
the  women  had,  God  bless  'em !  To  buy 
rights  at  the  more  than  likely  high  price 
of  privileges  is  a  noble  thing  to  do,  and  a 
courageous,  and  no  mistake.  'Tis  possible 
that,  fooling  with  the  working  machinery 
of  things,  starting  something  they  cannot 
stop,  women  will  get  more  than  they  bar- 
gained for.  Their  own  word  for  it,  they  in- 
tend to  stop  at  nothing  this  side  equality. 
Right  they  are.  Logic  is  on  their  side,  as 
it  is  on  the  side  of  determinism.  But, 
though  logic  and  facts,  also,  are  against 
us,  we  feel  free-willed,  even  we  mar- 
ried men.  Suppose  that,  together  with 
the  right  to  vote,  we  should  grant 
woman  the  right  to  make  her  own 
living,  pay  her  own  carfare,  us  alimony, 
plaster  our  broken  hearts  with  bills  of  big- 
gest denomination,  to  sit  with  her  back  to 
the  engine,  to  present  us  with  carbon 
harder,  more  brilliant,  and  many-sided,  than 
the  graphite  of  our  editorial  pencil,  to  bead 
her  low  brow  to  encircle  it  with  the  lustre 
wherewith  the  mute  oyster  covers  his  ir- 
ritation, the  right  to  be  served  last  and  to 
the  drumstick,  to  stay  with  the  ship  and  go 
down  gurgling  to  posterity,  and  many  an- 
other the  like  right  now  equally  unequal, 
all  rights  reserved  by  man  for  his  own  self- 
ish use  and  benefit.  The  world  do  move, 
needs  must,  though  the  times  be  out  of  joint. 
But  after  all  is  said  in  convention  and  done 
to  us,  is  the  gynecocentricity  of  the  more 
deadly  species  of  female  crank  mere  eccen- 
tricity? Are  these  women,  who  would  a 
voice  in  our  government,  a  most  unexcel- 
lent  thing,  a  voice  hard,  harsh  and  loud, 
"sports"  to  make  sport  of  or  normalities  to 
beweep?  Great  Goethe's  ghost!  What  are 
the  sorrows  of  Werther  compared  with  ours 
who  must  needs  have  with  us  always  in- 
stead of  the  eternal  womanly  the  infernal 
feminine?  There  is  a  tide  in  the  aflPairs  of 
men  so  dead  set  against  mere  man  as  not 
to  be  stemmed  by  any  swishing  of  Parting- 
ton pen.  The  house-cleaning  was  thorough, 
not  a  grease-spot  of  subsuperman  left  on 
the  wiped  up  floor  of  the  skating  pavilion. 
Will  posterity  bless  the  raucous  voice  raised 
in  its  behalf?  That  is  for  posterity,  if  such 
there  be,  to  say.  That  it  will  get  along 
very  well  without  us,  its  fathers,  goes  with- 
out saying. 


6 


TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


Correspondence 


The  Old  Story 
Editor  Town  Talk,  Dear  Sir:  I  see  that  Spring 
Valley  and  the  Supervisors  have  come  to  a  dis- 
agreement again.  Also,  I  see  that  Spring  Val- 
ley stock  took  a  drop  the  other  day.  All  of 
which  is  astonishing,  and  mystifying.  This  water 
problem  seems  like  the  Tennysonian  brook,  but 
it  will  have  to  be  solved  some  day.  Everybody 
knows  that  if  we  are  to  have  a  water  system  we 
shall  have  to  have  the  Spring  Valley  plant. 
Every  sensible  man  knows  that  the  sooner  we 
get  it  the  better.  It  would  have  been  profitable 
if  we  had  bought  it  years  ago.  Every  time  it 
has  been  offered  there  has  been  complaint  about 
the  price,  and  the  price  goes  steadily  up.  The 
company  is  denounced  for  raising  the  price,  but 
why  shouldn't  the  company  raise  the  price.  As 
the  city  grows  the  property  increases  in  value, 
and  if  you  stop  to  think  that  it  took  fifty  years 
to  gather  together  all  the  component  parts  of  the 
system  and  that  it  required  a  mighty  high  order 
of  brains  to  perfect  the  system,  you  will  have  to 
acknowledge  that  the  price  put  upon  it  is  far 
from  exorbitant.  Then  why  don't  our  leading 
citizens  get  together  with  our  public  officials  and 
fix  this  matter  up?  They've  got  to  do  it  some 
day.  In  a  very  few  years  our  water  supply  will 
be  inadequate,  and  if  something  isn't  done  the 
city  will  suffer.  By  the  way,  I  wonder  what's 
the  matter  with  Billy  Bourne.  When  he  took 
hold  we  were  told  he  was  a  great  financier,  a 
wizard  and  that  he  was  going  to  do  things.  He 
himself  promised  to  take  the  public  into  his  con- 
fidence and  force  the  issue.  Billy  isn't  getting 
results.  It's  easy  to  sit  back  and  draw  big 
di-  idends  out  of  a  mine,  but  dealing  with  the 


dear  people  and  their  representatives  is  another 
matter.  I  think  Billy  has  lots  to  learn.  I  fear 
that  financiering  has  made  him  a  little  too  self- 
confident  and  cocksure  and  self-satisfied. 

Yours  truly, 

— A  Reader. 


The  Complaint  of  a  Mere  Man 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  Wasn't  it  awful  the 
way  the  newspapers  spread  themselves  over  the 
convention  of  clubwomen  or  whatever  it  was  that 
brought  all  those  "fair  visitors"  here?  "Fair 
visitors!"  Those  are  the  words  that  glared  at  me 
every  time  I  took  up  a  newspaper,  and  always 
somewhere  on  the  same  page  was  a  group  of 
faces — and  oh!  such  faces!  Why  do  the  news- 
papers do  such  things?  I  read  the  morning 
paper  at  breakfast,  and  it  makes  me  mad  to  have 
my  appetite  taken  away.  I  don't  object  to  a 
woman  merely  because  she  isn't  beautiful.  I 
know  and  respect  many  women  who  are  not  good 
to  look  upon.  I  know  some  who  are  good  to 
look  upon  whom  I  do  not  respect.  The  good 
women  who  are  unbeautiful  are  all  right  as  friends 
and  acquaintances,  especially  when  you  don't  have 
to  meet  them  all  at  once  and  together,  but  the 
newspapers  are  heartless — they  just  thrust  faces 
upon  you  without  the  slightest  regard  to  your 
feelings.  And  then  to  make  matters  worse  they 
label  them  "fair  visitors."  Now  between  our- 
selves, Mr.  Editor,  did  you  meet  a  "fair  visitor" 
at  any  time  during  that  convention?  You  don't 
have  to  answer  if  you  don't  want  to,  but  what- 
ever you  do  don't  lie. 

Respectfully. 

• — Richard  L.  Bronte. 


His  Old  BeUef 
Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  Some  time  ago  you 
quoted  from  Mr.  Roosevelt's  life  of  Gouverneur 
Morris  and  you  excited  my  curiosity.  I  don't 
think  much  of  Roosevelt  as  a  historian  or  as  a 
writer,  but  I've  been  wading  through  his  life  of 
Morris,  and  I'm  grateful  to  you  for  having  started 
me  on  it.  I  find  that  as  you  say  Mr.  Roosevelt's 
sentiments  have  undergone  a  great  change.  When 
he  wrote  that  book  he  had  great  faith  in  our 
republican  system  as  it  stands.  Perhaps  it  might 
interest  your  readers  to  look  over  a  paragraph. 
He  says: 

"(Morris)  denounced,  with  a  fierce  scorn  that 
they  richly  merit,  the  despicable  demagogues  and 
witless  fools  who  teach  that  in  all  cases  the  voice 
of  the  majority  must  be  implicitly  obeyed,  and 
that  public  men  have  only  to  carry  out  its  will, 
and  thus  'acknowledge  themselves  the  willing  in- 
struments of  folly  and  vice.  They  declare  that, 
in  order  to  please  the  people,  they  will,  regardless 
alike  of  what  conscience  may  dictate  or  reason 
approve,  make  the  profligate  sacrifice  of  public 
right  on  the  altar  of  private  interest.  What  more 
can  be  asked  by  the  sternest  tyrant  of  the  most 
despicable  slave?  Creatures  of  this  sort  are  the 
tools  which  usurpers  employ  in  building  despot- 
ism.' Sounder  and  truer  maxims  never  were 
rttered." 

Mr.  Roosevelt  would  be  shocked  today  if  it 
were  suggested  to  him  that  to  carry  out  the  will 
nf  the  majority  is  to  be  the  instrument  of  folly 
and  vice. 

Yours  truly, 

— Thos.  L.  Oxnard. 


Siftings  from  Many  Sources 

Being  a  Brief  Chronicle  of  Significant  Events  the  Wide  World  Over 


The  Poisoner  of  India 

Arsenic  is  commonly  employed  by  the  profes- 
sional poisoner  in  India,  who  will  poison  a  whole 
family  to  make  sure  of  one  victim.  The  reports 
of  the  Bombay  Government  analysis  throw  some 
light  on  the  methods.  The  poison  is  usually 
given  in  sweetmeats,  and  generally  by  a  "strange 
woman"  who  has  been  met  in  the  street,  and  who 
mysteriously  disappears.  This  "strange  woman" 
is  found  in  every  analysis'  report  for  the  last 
twenty  years,  and  in  circumstances  so  identical 
that  it  would  almost  seem  to  be  the  same  person. 
Will  this  elusive  person  ever  be  captured  by  the 
Indian  police? 


Denationalization  of  France 

Unusual  attention  has  been  given  in  France  to 
the  recent  figures  of  vital  statistics  showing  an 
excess  of  deaths  over  births.  As  Paul  Leroy- 
Beaulieu  remarks  in  the  Economiste  Francais,  the 
story  is  an  old  one,  and  at  each  recurring  demon- 
stration of  the  falling  birthrate,  people  sigh  and 
exclaim,  but  nothing  is  done.  There  are  even 
those  who  say  that  the  steady  decline  of  the 
purely  French  population  does  not  greatly  matter. 
France  remains  a  fine  and  attractive  country  to 
live  in,  and  if  there  are  not  enough  of  the  native 
stock  to  populate  it  fully,  why,  Belgians  and 
Italians  and  Spaniards  and  Poles  will  flow  in  to 


By  Robert  McTavish 

make  up  the  deficiency.  But  then,  as  M.  Leroy- 
Beaulicu  insists,  if  it  is  not  depopulation,  it  is 
denationalization.  Those  are  the  alternatives 
with  which  France  is  seemingly  confronted. 


Faust's  Wine  Shop 

A  world  famous  wine  shop  is  about  to  dis- 
appear at  Leipsic.  This  is  Auerbach's  cellar,  or 
drinking  place,  which  owes  its  special  celebrity 
to  the  fact  that  Goethe  located  in  it  the  scene  in 
"Faust"  in  which  Mephistopheles,  standing  upon 
a  wine  cask,  takes  his  flight  into  space,  to  the 
stupefaction  of  the  drinkers.  The  old  building  in 
which  the  cellar  is  found  was  built  by  Dr. 
Stromer  D'Auerbach  between  1530  and  1538,  and 
the  worthy  doctor  began  by  putting  there  the 
wine  which  he  intended  for  his  own  use.  Later, 
as  the  wine  was  good,  he  conceived  the  idea  of 
selling  it,  and  in  this  way  was  established  the 
tavern  to  which  his  name  has  since  been  at- 
tached. From  the  earliest  years  of  the  seven- 
teenth century  legend  placed  in  this  cellar  the 
famous  adventure  of  Faust  and  Mephistopheles. 
Goethe,  studying  at  Leipsic  from  1765  to  1768, 
frequented  the  cellar,  and  there  talked  with  his 
friend  of  art,  literature  and  politics,  and  later 
turned  the  legend  to  account. 


Richard  Baxter's  Tomb 

Christ  Church,  Newgate  street,  stands  partly 


upon  the  site  of  the  ancient  church  of  the  Grey 
Friars,  or  Franciscans.  It  was  formerly  famous 
for  magnificent  monuments,  most  of  which  were 
destroyed  at  the  Reformation.  Here,  amid  the 
dust  of  "Popish"  Queens  and  murderers  from  the 
neighboring  prison,  lies  the  great  Noncon- 
formist minister,  Richard  Baxter,  whose  tomb 
bears  the  brief  but  expressive  epitaph:  "The 
Saint's  Rest."  A  very  different  cleric  from  Bax- 
ter, buried  near  the  pulpit  in  1814,  was  James 
Boyer,  the  flogging  headmaster  of  Christ's  Hos- 
pital during  the  school  days  of  Coleridge  and 
Charles  Lamb.  About  him  Coleridge  remarked: 
"It  was  lucky  the  cherubim  who  took  him  to 
heaven  were  nothing  but  faces  and  wings,  or  he 
would  infallibly  have  flogged  them  by  the  way." 


INVITATIONS  MONOGRAMS  CRESTS 

VISITING  CARD  PLATES  ENGRAVED 


ROBERTSON 


UNION  SQUARE  SAN  FRANCISCO 


July  6.  1912  TOWN  TALK 


In  this  generation,  abounding  as  it  does  in 
politicians  incredibly  virtuous,  amazingly  right- 
eous, angelically  unselfish,  it  is  like  a  breeze  from 
the  breakers  on  a  muggy  day  to  meet  a  frank, 
candid  enemy  of  reform,  an  unashamed  veteran 
of  the  machine,  that  alien  body  which  formerly 
interposed  between  the  people  and  their  govern- 
ment. "Such  a  man,"  as  they  say  on  the  floor  of 
the  convention,  is  Martin  Kelly.  Martin  Kelly 
comes  down  to  us  from  the  bad  glad  days  when 
the  boss  aspired  not  to  political  office,  when 
"slates"  were  made  in  back  rooms.  In  those 
evil  days  Governors  were  beholden  to  bosses,  and 
were  allowed  to  go  only  so  far.  Nowadays  the 
boss  and  the  Governor  are  one,  and  go  as  far  as 
they  like.  Such  is  Martin  Kelly's  description  of 
the  difference  efifected  in  the  interest  of  the  dear 
pee-pul. 

Martin  Kelly  has  quit  the  firing  line,  withdrawn 
from  the  fray.  He  views  from  the  seclusion  of 
private  life  the  contests  for  civic  redemption  con- 
ducted by  the  rectitudinous  reformers  hotfooting 
for  jobs.  Now  approaching  the  three-score-and- 
ten-year  period,  pleased  with  himself  as  the  father 
of  five  sons  and  four  daughters,  he  is  responsible 
to  no  one  but  himself,  and  this  responsibiltiy  rests 
lightly  on  care-free  shoulders.  Martin  Kelly  has 
grown  old  somewhat  gracefully.  In  his  day  he 
wielded  great  influence  in  the  politics  of  this  city 
and  State,  and  he  is  still  a  man  whom  a  vivid  and 
forceful  personality  makes  interesting.  In  con- 
versation he  has  not  the  garrulity  that  might  be 
expected  of  a  man  of  his  years  whose  career  has 
been  full  of  drama.  His  thoughts  and  views  are 
elicited  rather  than  volunteered,  and  are  crisply 
and  happily  phrased.  As,  for  example,  when  he 
made  answer  on  being  asked  what  he  thought  of 
the  Life  of  Abraham  Ruef  now  running  serially 
in  the  Bulletin.  "It  is  interesting,"  he  said,  "only 
because  Ruef  remains  a  rogue."  He  added:  "Ruef 
has   talent   for   interesting  misrepresentation." 

As  I  talked  with  Martin  Kelly  about  the  lit- 
erature that  is  now  flowing  from  a  prison  cell 
I  realized  how  true  it  is  that  one  anecdote  of  a 
man  may  be  more  valuable  than  a  whole  volume 
of  his  life  even  from  so  authoritative  a  source 
as  himself.  What  is  most  human,  most  genuine, 
the  auto-biographer  is  strongly  tempted  to  omit. 
Ruef  has  told  us  of  the  county  convention  of 
1886  when  he  thought  he  broke  the  slate,  only 
to  learn  later  that  it  was  the  boss  that  broke  it. 
He  tells  us  nothing  of  the  contest  for  assessor 
between  John  Daly  and  John  Siebe.  Yet  it  was 
his  conduct  in  that  contest  that  made  him  a 
marked  man  for  years.  Martin  Kelly  tells  the 
story.  "Ruef,"  he  said,  "though  counted  on  for 
Daly  voted  himself  and  his  two  delegates  from  the 
Beach  for  Siebe,  but  Daly  was  nominated.  Ruef 
saw  that  he  had  blundered.  So  he  rushed  off  to 
Daly,  and  he  said,  'Say,  John,  I  knew  you'd  win. 
I  got  three  hundred  dollars  a  piece  for  those 
three  votes.  I  knew  they  wouldn't  matter,  and 
I  thought  I'd  take  the  money  and  spend  it  in 
your  fight  to  elect  you.'  Daly  was  no  fool.  He 
told  Ruef  he  wanted  nothing  more  to  do  with 
him,  to  keep  his  money." 

Martin  Kelly  the  politician  is  also  a  literary 
critic,  and  as  such  he  sees  in  Ruef's  autobiography 
an  entertaining  compilation  greatly  in  need  of 
annotation  and  correction.  Accordingly  he  takes 
up  the  text  and  interlards  it  with  scraps  of  his 


Varied  Types 

LXXXI— MARTIN  KELLY 
By  Theodore  Bonnet 

own,  with  notes  and  commentaries.  You  might 
call  him  a  collaborator  as  well  as  a  critic. 

"Ruef,"  he  says,  "makes  it  appear  that  he  was 
a  fine  young  man  when  he  came  out  of  college, 
and  that  he  was  corrupted  by  the  bosses  after  he 
had  fought  them  for  years.  Ruef  as  a  matter  of 
fact  was  strictly  business  from  the  ground  up — 
but  his  business  was  never  straight.  His  early 
environment  and  associates  were  bad,  and  by  the 
time  he  got  into  politics  there  was  nothing  left 
of  him  to  be  tainted.  The  truth  is  the  bosses 
kept  him  fairly  straight.  If  he'd  been  left  to  him- 
self he'd  have  landed  in  San  Quentin  long  ago. 
He  says  he  was  affiliated  with  Kelly  and  Crim- 
mins  for  ten  years.  He  represents  me  as  trying 
to  tempt  him.  I  never  asked  him  to  do  a  thing 
in  his  life." 


MARTIN  KELLY 


Let  not  Martin  Kelly  be  understood  as  deny- 
ing any  soft  or  even  hard  impeachments.  He 
doesn't  give  himself  any  certificates  of  character. 
He  isn't  supersensitive,  but  it's  apparent  enough 
that  it  wounds  him  to  be  represented  as  one  of 
Ruef's  seducers. 

"Ruef  says  he  fought  me,"  Kelly  observed  with 
a  cynical  smile.  "That  was  in  1890,  I  believe.  I 
remember  well  meeting  him  in  that  year.  That 
was  when  I  first  got  onto  his  game.  He  was 
then  young  in  politics,  but  he  knew  where  the 
stuff  was.  His  ambition  was  to  name  the  Public 
Administrator  and  handle  the  fees  of  that  office. 
He  was  brought  to  me  the  night  before  the  con- 
vention in  a  saloon  on  Third  street.  Dr.  Meyers 
and  Myer  Jacobs  had  told  me  what  he  wanted, 
and  they  brought  him  to  me  to  fix  the  matter  up. 
I  remember  I  called  for  a  bottle  of  wine.  Ruef 
didn't  drink.  He  had  no  vices,  but  I  never  could 
see  that  he  had  any  virtues  either.  I  said,  'Ruef, 
the  trouble  with  you  is  that  a  man  can't  bet  his 
money  on  you  over  night.'  He  said,  'Is  that 
your  opinion  of  me,  Mr.  Kelly.'    Said  I,  'That's 


the  opinion  your  conduct  compels  me  to  have. 
After  some  further  talk  with  Ruef  and  Dr.  Meyers 
I  turned  them  over  to  Phil  Crimmins.  Now  at 
that  time  Lou  Wadham  was  programed  for  Pub- 
lic Administrator,  and  he  had  an  attorney  who 
agreed  to  split  the  fees  with  Ruef.  Wadham  was 
nominated,  and  he  was  beaten  by  Captain  Freese. 
The  next  election  Ruef  bobbed  up  again — still 
after  the  Public  Administrator's  job.  Finally,  1 
think  it  was  in  1896,  he  got  Drinkhouse,  and  you 
remember  what  happened — Jack  Chretien  went 
to  jail  and  we  all  know  how  Ruef  kept  out.  Next 
time  Ruef  wanted  Drinkhouse  renominated.  Tom 
Riordan  objected.  Tom  wanted  to  be  attorney 
for  the  Administrator  for  awhile.  Ruef  whined, 
said  he  made  no  money;  was  getting  poor  in 
politics.  I  went  out  to  the  City  Hall,  got  the 
Public  Administrator's  reports  and  got  a  line  on 
Ruef's  fees.  I  found  he  had  made  thousands  of 
dollars.  When  I  showed  him  the  figures  he  said, 
'Oh,  those  figures  are  phoney.  I  swelled  them 
to  make  Tom  Riordan  jealous.'  Now  what  can 
you  do  with  a  fellow  like  that?" 

Kelly  went  over  with  me  each  chapter  of  the 
Ruef  auto-biography.  He  has  them  all  in  a  scrap- 
book.  He  confesses  that  they  make  him  angry 
because  of  the  malice  that  is  in  them.  And  it  is 
because  of  the  malice  that  he  has  no  hesitation 
in  picturing  the  former  boss  in  his  true  colors. 
"The  whole  thing  is  a  boost  for  himself  and  a 
knock  for  the  other  fellow,"  is  the  way  Kelly 
characterizes  the  performance.  "A  pretty  mean 
sort  of  thing,"  he  added.  "See  what  he  said  about 
Pillsbury.  I  don't  know  what  Pillsbury  ever  did 
to  him.  I'm  not  very  friendly  with  Pillsbury 
now,  but  I  know  he  never  split  any  two-Iumdrcd- 
and-fifty  dollar  fee  with  Ruef.  He's  not  that 
sort  of  man." 

The  veteran  boss  next  directed  my  attention 
to  the  story  of  the  Schmitz  election.  "You'd 
think  Ruef  did  it  all,"  he  said.  "Now  I  was  run- 
ning the  Republican  Alliance  in  that  campaign. 
We  had  12,000  names  on  the  roll.  I  did  busi- 
ness with  Schmitz  direct,  not  with  Ruef.  Schmitz 
promised  me  to  make  Fred  Esola  chief  of  police. 
He  promised  to  put  Al.  Berthier  on  the  Board  of 
Public  Works.  He  promised  me  one  police  com- 
missioner and  two  fire  commissioners.  I  got  in 
behind  him.  After  election  I  had  an  engagement 
with  him.  He  didn't  show  up,  but  in  came  a 
clerk  from  Ruef's  office,  telling  me  that  Schmitz 
would  see  me  there.  I  went  and  Ruef  met  me. 
As  soon  as  he  saw  me  he  said,  'Say,  Kelly,  if  you 
get  all  those  jijbs  there'll  be  nothing  left  for  us.' 
(Continued  on  Page  22.) 


Going  Jib  road? 

To  the  Orient? 

To  the  Mediterranean? 

To  the  West  Indies? 

To  South  America? 

To  Egypt  and  the  Nile? 

To  London,  Paris,  Berlin  and  Italy? 

Around  the  World? 

Or  a  flight  in  a  Zeppelin  Airship? 

Get  programs  of  our  Famous  Pleasure  Cruises 
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TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


Perspective  Impressions 


Talk  like  ready  money  even  if  you  don't  look 
it.    Talk  is  cheap  and  it  goes  a  long  way. 


The  lady  who  brought  her  knitting  to  the 
Convention  of  women's  clubs  has  a  fine  sense  of 
irony. 


"Battle  Bob"  says  that  Roosevelt's  success  in 
the  primary  campaign  was  of  no  benefit  to  the 
Progressive  cause,  being  only  the  kind  of  suc- 
cess that  intoxicates  and  deceives  the  people. 
How  astonishing  to  hear  a  Progressive  talk  of 
the   intoxication   and   deception   of   the  people! 


James  J.  Hill  who  went  on  a  fishing  trip  the 
other  day  is  the  one  man  in  the  world  able  to 
prove  by  facts  and  figures  that  there  are  not  as 
good  fish  in  the  sea  as  ever  were  caught. 


Great  is  Bryan!  Did  he  not  thrice  poll  several 
millions  of  enlightened  American  vote.s?  What 
further    proof    want    ye,    O    fat-witted  fellow 


citizens,  of  the  prodigious  greatness  that  passeth 
understanding?  It  is  the  premier  paradox  of 
Democracy  that  popularity  is  prima  facie  evi- 
dence of  genius  and  is  almost  the  exclusive  pos- 
session of  Mediocrity. 


Now  that  two  bleeding  and  quivering  hearts 
have  been  exposed  to  view  how  interesting  it 
would  be  to  learn  the  exact  number  of  American 
sovereigns  who  remain  steadfast  in  their  faith 
and  proud  of  their  powers  of  discernment! 


The  prosaic  man  may  be  satisfied  with  a  mar- 
riage that  gives  him  nothing  but  a  wife;  the 
modish  woman,  with  a  marriage  that  gives  her 
everything  but  a  husband. 


A  sane  Fourth  is  much  to  be  desired,  but  not 
any  more  so  than  a  sane  attitude  toward  the  other 
good  things  for  which  we  are  indebted  to  the 
Founders. 


Once  more  we  are  told  the  Apostle  Paul  was 
mistaken  about  woman.  Well,  if  we  may  judge 
from  the  scandal  news  in  the  daily  press  there 
are  many  modern  preachers  who  could  give  the 
.■\postle  pointers  about  the  sex.  Yet  Saul  of 
Tarsus  was  no  anchorite  before  he  saw  the  light. 


If  there  is  anything  in  the  old  superstition  that 
you  can  get  your  dearest  wish  by  thinking  of  it 
while  gently  stroking  the  hind  quarters  of  a 
jackass,  the  Hon.  Francis  J.  Heney  might  find  it 
profitable  to  charge  a  small  fee  for  the  privilege 
on  the  Chautauqua  circuit. 


The  Rev.  A.  A.  Hull  of  Sacramento  has  been 
found  guilty  of  immoral  conduct.  From  which 
circumstance  it  is  to  be  inferred  that  he  was 
very  zealous  for  the  regeneration  of  all  devotees 
of  the  sins  he  wasn't  inclined  to. 


The  Gypsy 


Lisa  was  an  ordinary  girl.  She  had,  indeed, 
black  eyes  and  black  hair;  but  are  there  so  few 
girls  likewise  blessed?  She  is  a  trifle  above  .the 
average  in  height,  but  many  of  her  chums  are  as 
tall.  Lisa  graduated  from  the  Gymnasium  with 
high  honors,  but  did  not  her  friends  read  the 
newest  of  books,  Chekhov,  Gorky  and  Andriev? 
All  her  friends  and  acquaintances  are  at  home 
with  these  authors. 

Withal  she  is  but  an  ordinary  girl;  that  is, 
when  she  is  present  at  a  gathering,  at  a  ball 
or  wedding,  she  does  not  possess  that  something 
which  might  tend  to  single  her  out  from  her 
sisters.    She  is  lost  in  the  crowd  of  other  girls. 

Lisa  knows  this  well,  and  the  knowledge  of  it 
brings  her  pangs  of  sorrow.  In  this  respect  she 
is  not  ordinary.  Lisa  wishes  to  be  marked  out 
by  some  extraordinary  trait.  In  an  assemblage 
of  people  she  does  not  like  to  be  identified  with 
the  crowd,  but  wishes  to  be  known  apart  from 
it.  This  feeling  was  developed  in  her  to  the 
extent  of  a  disease,  and  if  people  were  better  able 
to  peep  within  her  soul,  Lisa  would  be  regarded 
as  out  of  the  ordinary.  This  would  perhaps  bring 
her  comfort  and  rid  her  of  a  constant  sense  of 
unworthiness.  Lisa  did  possess  good  qualities, 
but  these  virtues  were  not  the  superficial  ones 
which  folks  could  point  out,  but  inner  ones.  For 
instance,  if  she  found  herself  at  a  ball,  or  a  sim- 
ilar public  gathering,  where  all  the  company 
would  talk,  laugh  and  jest,  she  would  retire  to 
a  corner  in  studied  thoughtfulness,  making  her- 
self romantically  sad  and  pretending  that  she 
saw  no  one  but  her  inward  self.  At  such  mo- 
ments she  was  indeed  extraordinary.  But  the 
crowd  did  not  even  notice  her,  and  Lisa  would 
become  lonesome  in  her  retreat  and  in  her  anger 
she  would  keep  herself  aloof  from  the  circle. 

And  the  pain  would  be  more  intense  whenever 
it  happened  that  among  those  about  her  there 
was  one  who  caught  the  eyes  and  the  attention 
of  all.  At  these  moments  Lisa  would  keenly  feel 
her  unattractiveness,  and  feelings  of  hatred  for 
the  unconscious  object  of  her  jealousy  would 
mingle  with  her  pain.  But  she  usually  remained 
with  the  crowd  dancing  around  the  star,  who 
was  indeed  proud,  but  gracious  and  friendly  to 
Lisa. 


By  Abraham  Reisin  (From  the  Yiddish) 

In  the  circle  in  which  Lisa  found  herself  it  was 
decided  to  have  a  ball.  A  certain  happy,  jolly 
girl,  an  intimate  friend  of  Lisa,  advised  that  it 
should  be  a  costumed  affair.  , 

"A  masquerade  ball?"  the  other  asked. 

"No;  not  a  masquerade  ball,"  she  explained, 
"without  masks,  but  in  costumes." 

The  suggestion  met  with  approval,  and  Lisa, 
having  black  hair,  selected  the  costume  of  a  gypsy, 
upon  the  advice  of  her  many  friends. 

Her  long,  black  tresses  she  let  fall  loosely  in 
seeming  disorder  upon  her  shoulders;  in  the  cen- 
ter of  her  coiffure  she  placed  a  clasp  of  brilliant 
jewels  and  draped  her  shoulders  with  a  deep  red 
shawl. 

Thus  she  appeared  at  the  ball.  At  the  cloak- 
room she  could  not  help  seeing  the  attendant  gaze 
upon  her  and  her  costume  with  a  look  of  interest 
and  smiling  satisfaction.  Lisa  was  frightened  and 
at  the  same  time  overjoyed,  and  with  this  feeling 
she  entered  the  ball-room. 

She  was  met  with  an  acclaim  of  bravos  by  a 
whole  retinue  of  young  people. 

For  the  moment  she  was  embarrassed,  but  a 
friend  at  once  approached  her  and  reassured  her. 

"Oh,  how  beautiful  you  are,  how  interesting!" 

"Really?"  Lisa  naively  asked,  and  her  heart 
commenced  to  flutter. 

"Wonderful!    See  how  all  are  staring  at  you." 

Lisa  raised  her  eyes  and  met  the  gaze  of  a 
hundred  others.  She  lowered  her  own,  but  soon 
accustomed  herself  to  the  attention  she  was  at- 
tracting. 

A  moment  later  a  young  man  walked  up  to  her, 
one  of  the  prominent  ones  who  had  heretofore 
never  noticed  her. 

"I  seek  the  good  fortune,  fraulein,  of  the  first 
dance  with  you." 

Before  she  had  time  to  reply,  another  ap- 
proached her  and  with  an  admiring  look,  not 
speaking,  but  almost  singing: 

"Beautiful  gypsy — let  me  be  fortunate  for  once 
in  a  short,  foolish  life— do  not  deny  me— to  dance 
the  first  dance  with — " 

"Already  taken,"  the  other  announced  in  a  tone 
of  decision  and  pleasure. 

She  danced  with  both.  Both  pleased  her.  Both 
pressed  her  tenderly,  gazed  upon  her  lovingly. 


She  could  not  dance  much  with  these  two. 
Others  were  there  to  claim  her.  They  snatched 
her  from  the  chair  when  she  would  sit  to  try  to 
steal  a  minute's  rest. 

"Oh,  how  beautiful  is  the  gypsy,  how  interest- 
ing!"   Words  like  these  greeted  her  on  all  sides. 

She  wished  for  a  moment  of  rest  in  which  she 
could  fully  realize  the  good  fortune  which  had 
so  suddenly  and  unexpectedly  come  upon  her. 

But  this  was  denied  her. 

"I  beg  of  you,  beautiful  gypsy,  a  quadrille?" 

Like  a  fairy  she  glided  about  the  large  dance 
hall.  The  red  shawl  upon  her  shoulders  was  like 
wings  which  would  lift  her  on  high;  the  loose 
flowing  hair,  raven  black,  flowed  out  in  gypsy 
wildncss  and  entangled  itself  in  the  red  drapery, 
and  all  of  this  rendered  Lisa  the  more  remark- 
able and  picturesque. 

They  "devoured  her  with  their  eyes."  One,  of 
whom  Lisa  had  never  dared  before  this  even  to 
think,  made  love  to  her  during  the  dance.  She 
felt  that  he  kissed  her  black  hair  and  she  caught 
her  breath  for  joy. 

Finally  the  crowd  in  the  hall  thinned  out,  the 
clock  struck  four,  and  many  voices  were  heard 
in  favor  of  ending  the  dance.  Lisa  felt  as  if  there 
was  coming  a  close  to  a  great  holiday,  which  per- 
haps would  never  come  again. 

She  was  lost  in  thought.  , 

"Adieu,"  spoke  the  one  who  had  announced  his 
love  to  her.  "Thanks  for  the  pleasure  you  have 
given  me  with  your  beautiful  costume." 

"Adieu,"  Lisa  forced  herself  to  smile,  but  she 
did  not  succeed.  There  was  a  cloud  upon  her 
face,  and  it  seemed  that  even  the  red  shawl  paled. 

Returning  home,  Lisa  stood  before  the  glass 
and  once  more  looked  at  her  costume. 

(Continued  on  Page  ??.) 


LUCERNE  APARTMENTS 

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JUST  OPENED 

Elegant  sunny   2,   3.  4   and   5-room   apartments  with 
complete  service.    Furnished  or  unfurnished. 

Telephone  Franklin  7866 


July  6,  1912  TOWN  TALK 

Poems  About  San  Francisco 


("Jimmy"  Linen,  as  he  was  affectionately  called,  wrote  a  rather  long  poem  called  "The  Golden  Gate"  which 
was  published  here  many  years  ago  and  is  now  quite  scarce.  The  following  lines  are  from  the  opening  pages  of 
this  poem.) 


XLVII— THE  GOLDEN  GATE 
By  James  Linen 


O  ye  men  of  thought  and  with  hearts  elate, 
Come,  muse  with  me  by  the  Golden  Gate; 
Your  seat  be  a  rock  where  the  sea-weeds  grow, 
And  the  restless  tides  ever  ebb  and  flow — 
Where  the  rushing  waves  on  their  shoreward  track, 
Swirl  their  seething  surf  round  the  bowlders  black: 
Let  the  brow  of  Care  by  the  breeze  be  fanned. 
And  with  rapture  gaze  on  the  rugged  strand 
Of  the  Golden  Gate  of  the  golden  land. 
Where  the  winds  are  cold  and  the  skies  are  bleak. 
And  the  tempests  rage  and  the  sea-birds  shriek; 
Where  the  surf-crowned  waves,  as  they  seaward  go. 
Seem  like  long  white  wreaths  of  the  drifted  snow; 
Where  rocks  upon  rocks  are  fearfully  piled, 
And  winds  whistle  tunes  that  are  weird  and  wild; 
Where  thunders  are  heard  and  the  lightnings  play, 
O'er  the  beetling  crags  that  are  dashed  by  spray, 


And  where  billows  rave  with  a  restless  roar. 
Tower  Bonita's  peaks  by  a  jagged  shore; 
And  where  Lobos  frowns  with  its  shaggy  steep 
And  defiance  bids  to  the  surging  deep; 
Where  the  hungry  wolves  of  the  dreary  past. 
Howled  over  the  cliffs  to  the  howling  blast; 
Where,  near  to  Seal  Rock  the  sea-lions'  wail 
Is  heard  in  the  sound  of  the  sweeping  gale, 
And  the  screaming  gulls  finding  crcwless  decks. 
Rest  their  weary  wings  on  the  drifting  wrecks; 
And  a  stormy  sea  and  a  stormy  sky 
Speak  in  thunder  tones  of  the  dangers  nigh — 
Of  the  dreaded  Bar  with  its  awful  waves 
That  in  fury  roll  over  dead  men's  graves. 
So  dreadfully  wild,  so  terribly  grand. 
Is  the  Golden  Gate  of  the  golden  land. 


Joy  in  the  Phelan  Clan 

The  nomination  of  Woodrow  Wilson  brought 
gloom  to  the  delegates  from  California,  but  it 
gladdened  the  hearts  of  some  of  our  noblest 
patriots.  Hardly  had  the  news  of  the  Princeton 
professor's  success  been  flashed  over  the  wire 
when  the  call  to  arms  was  sounded  for  the 
Phelan  clan,  and  at  once  the  leading  orators  were 
busy  burnishing  their  rhetoric  for  the  fray. 
Jimmy  himself  emerged  from  umbrage  with  a  face 
wreathed  with  smiles  and  whiskers.  Of  late 
Jimmy  has  been  sulking  sadly  in  the  background. 
With  a  consuming  passion  for  the  limelight,  the 
studied  and  systematic  neglect  of  him  has  been 
anguish  to  his  soul,  and  when  it  looked  as  though 
Clark  would  be  nominated  he  was  the  most  mis- 
erable man  in  all  the  land.  If  Clark  had  been 
nominated  Hearst  would  have  been  the  director- 
general  of  the  campaign  in  California,  and  our 
young  millionaire  whose  ambition  to  be  United 
States  Senator  remains  the  moving  principle  of 
him  would  not  have  been  vouchsafed  a  look-in. 
Hence  the  tumultuous  elation  of  him  when  the 
man  from  New  Jersey  carried  off  the  prize. 
Jimmy  was  for  holding  a  ratification  meeting 
right  away.  His  mind  soused  in  the  cant  of 
progressive  politics,  the  familiar  language  of 
Presidential  campaigns  was  foaming  on  his  eager 
lips.  He  was  in  fine  fettle  for  eulogiums,  his 
vocabulary  of  ringing  words  was  at  his  tongue's 
end,  and  he  was  wild  with  desire  to  utter  bugle 
notes  to  civic  patriotism.  So  hurry  calls  were  is- 
sued at  the  Public  Administrator's  ofiice  and  at 


On  July  1,  1912 
We  will  move  our  offices  to 
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INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 
Will  be  Considerably  Increased 

Established  1858 

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The  Spectator 

every  public  club  where  a  Democratic  friend  of 
the  people  is  proving  his  devotion  to  them  in  the 
strenuous  role  of  taxeater.  Tommy  Hickey  and 
Alex  Voelsang  came  on  the  run.  Dr.  Taylor  tod- 
dled up  to  report  for  duty.  Senator  Caminetti 
was  Johnny-on-the-spot.  Frank  Gould  teleplioned 
from  the  Union  League  Club  the  news  of  his 
loyalty  to  Jefifersonian  principles.  It  was  soon 
apparent  that  there  would  be  speakers  enough  for 
half  a  dozen  ratification  meetings.  And  Jimmy 
felt  strong  enough  to  talk  at  all  of  them,  and  he 
was  for  celebrating  that  very  night  ostensibly  the 
nomination  of  Wilson  but  in  reality  the  golden 
opportunities  that  had  come  to  himself. 


Behold  Honest  Tom 

Scant  notice  have  the  dailies  given  us  of  Gov- 
ernor Thomas  Riley  Marshall  of  Indiana,  running 
mate  of  Woodrow  Wilson.  Perhaps  they  are  not 
well  acquainted  with  this  odorous  blossom  of 
Democracy.  Thomas  is  a  characteristic  product 
of  progressive  politics,  a  self-righteous  reformer, 
almost  too  good  even  for  the  sanctimonious  com- 
panionship of  the  author  of  the  History  of  the 
American  People.  Thomas  is  a  lawyer,  but  the 
law  as  a  profession  is  too  demoralizing  for  him. 
He  is  too  highminded  and  pure  to  be  associated 
with  the  law.  This  I  learned  two  months  ago 
when  Thomas  addressed  an  audience  at  a  Y.  M. 
C.  A.  mass  meeting  in  Washington,  D.  C.  What 
the  Governor  of  Indiana  said  on  that  occasion  was 
printed  in  the  newspapers  of  the  country  and 
commented  on  by  many  of  them.  I  pigeon-holed 
it  for  future  reference.  He  asked:  "Do  you  know 
why  I  forsook  the  practice  of  the  law  in  Indiana 
to  enter  politics?"  And  he  explained:  "Well,  it 
was  to  preserve  my  self-respect.  I  wanted  to  get 
into  a  profession  where  my  conscience  could  be 
given  breathing  room,  where  I  would  not  have 
to  wink  one  eye  at  the  truth."  Thus,  you  see, 
Thomas  is  a  genuine  Progressive  son  of  righteous- 
ness, a  worthy  representative  of  the  sterling  band 
of  patriots  which  now  finds  favor  with  the  virtue- 
loving  and  incredibly  unsophisticated  American 
people. 


The  Slowness  of  His  Disillusionment 

It  is  of  no  consequence  in  this  era  of  invincible 
gullibility  that  it  took  Governor  Marshall  a  long 
time  to  get  wise  to  the  debasing  influence  of  the 
law  on  his  sensitive  conscience.  Nevertheless 
when  he  lifted  up  his  eyes  in  Washington  to 
thank  Heaven  for  his  moral  resurrection  the  in- 
quisitive of  the  press  proceeded  to  scrutinize  the 
record  of  his  career.  They  found  that  Thomas 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1875.  He  practiced 
steadily  and  lucratively  until  the  summer  of  1908 
when  the  Democratic  party  of  Indiana  nominated 
him  for  Governor.  It  was  politics  that  saved  the 
soul  of  the  sinner.  For  thirty-three  years  Tom 
Marshall's  conscience  was  panting  for  breathing 
room  as  the  hart  for  the  water-brooks.  And 
it  might  have  been  panting  yet  had  not  a  nice, 
fat  job  been  handed  to  him  by  the  Democratic 
party.  Yet  Tom  did  not  enter  the  demoralizing 
profession  with  his  eyes  closed.  He  was  no  self- 
made  lawyer.  A  college  graduate,  he  never  had 
to  struggle  for  bread.  The  disillusioning  of  him, 
despite  his  education,  was  a  slow  process.  His 
change  of  heart  did  not  come  till  he  reached  his 
fifty-fifth  year,  but  it  might  have  came  earlier 
had  Tom  known  of  the  purifying  effect  of  politics. 
Here  is  a  profession  that  affords  illimitable  space 
for  respiration.  It  is  almost  as  good  for  the  soul 
as  theology  and  just  as  good  for  the  opportunities 
it  holds  for  the  uplifting  of  mankind.  I  will  as- 
sume that  the  Bar  Associations  of  the  whole  coun- 
try will  organize  Marshall  clubs  in  this  campaign. 


Their  Abortive  Scheme 

The  Mercantile  Trust  Company  is  doing  busi- 
ness at  the  old  stand,  and  there  has  been  no 


J.  C.  WILSON  &  CO. 

/New  York  Stock  Exchange 
,       )  New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
Membcrs<  (-i^l^ggQ  Board  of  Trade 

l,The  Stock  and  Bond  Exchange,  S.  F. 

Main  Office — MILLS    BUILDING,   San  Francisco 

Branch  Offices — Los  Angeles,  San  Diego,  Coronado 
Beach,  Portland,  Ore.,  Seattle,  Wash,  Vancouver,  B.  C. 


10 


TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


perceptible  change  in  the  personnel  of  the  ftock- 
holders.  Yet  but  a  few  weeks  ago  it  was  rum- 
ored that  the  Spreckels  brothers — Gus  and 
Rudolph — were  going  to  get  a  controlling  in- 
terest in  that  institution.  First  it  was  rumored 
that  they  wanted  to  sell  about  one  thousand 
shares  of  stock  which  came  to  them  through  their 
father's  estate.  It  is  said  they  would  have  sold 
had  they  been  able  to  obtain  a  price  far  above 
the  market  value.  When  they  found  they  could- 
n't get  it  they  sent  a  letter  to  each  of  the  stock- 
holders offering  a  dollar  a  share  for  an  option 
on  the  stock  at  a  price  that  might  have  been 
considered  tempting.  All  who  might  be  disposed 
to  make  a  little  easy  money  were  asked  to  step 
up  and  deposit  their  shares.  Financiers  sat  up 
and  took  notice.  Which  was  quite  natural,  see- 
ing that  the  two  Spreckels  brothers  have  the 
"goods"  behind  them  and  are  somewhat  uncon- 
ventional in  their  financiering.  It  was  supposed 
that  the  men  who  control  the  Mercantile  Trust 
would  get  scared  to  death.  But,  so  far  as  I  can 
learn,  they  didn't  bat  an  eye.  Indeed,  rumor  has 
it  that  they  went  about  their  business  as  if 
nothing  could  happen.  And  as  a  matter  of  fact 
nothing  did  happen.  Not  one  stockholder  of  the 
company  accepted  the  Spreckels'  proposition. 
Now  the  question  is.  What  will  the  Spreckels 
brothers  do  next?    You  never  can  tell. 


Peter's  Pence 

Our  young  confrere  and  townsman,  Peter  B. 
Kyne,  continues  to  fill  the  honor  places — and 
his  purse — in  the  best  buying  magazines  at  such 
a  rate  as  to  incur  the  envy,  if  not  enmity,  of 
burners  of  midnight  oil  that  cannot  so  make  their 
light  shine  before  men,  nor  the  good  work  they 
are  doing  to  appear  in  any  publication,  glory  be 
to  the  Father  which  is  in  heaven!  The  green- 
eyed  talk  as  if  Peter,  through  his  namesake,  the 
doorkeeper,  had  a  pull  with  Providence.  But  in- 
siders well  know  that  all  the  pull  Peter  has  is 
push,  plus  the  gift  of  story-telling.  They  dis- 
credit the  author  of  "A  Little  Matter,"  etc.,  with 
being  stronger  on  fictitious  than  genuine  literary 
values.  To  be  stronger  on  fiction  than  on  fine 
writing  is  to  have  the  greater  strength,  such  as 
is  acquired  in  no  gymnasium  known.  Certain  it 
is,  the  honor  accorded  Peter  of  the  editors  is  not 
without  profit.  Save  in  his  own  country  he 
could,  if  he  had  a  mind  to,  the  need.  Peter 
Kyne's  nose  for  a  saleable  story  smelling  of  the 
sea,  is  prodigious.  Prodigious,  too,  is  his  good 
horse-power  and  horse  sense.  While  the  en- 
vious are  wringing  hands  or  folding,  or  holding 
up  in  horror,  posing  for  art  her  sake,  Peter  is 
nosing  round  the  \vater  front,  fishing  for  real 
live  men,  the  makings  for  a  savory  mess  for, 
say.  The  Saturday  Evening  Post,  the  Sunset,  or 
The  Popular,  seeking  adventures  to  be  featured 
of  Adventure.  Arrived  home,  he  uncorks  a 
corker,  sits  down  to  his  typewriter,  and  rattles 
off  a  rattling  good  one  as  if  he  had  all  letters  at 
his  fingers'  ends.  The  proof  of  the  plum-pud- 
ding is  in  the  pot-boiling.  If  a  man  does  good 
work,  he  eats.  Peter  B.  Kyne  eats  his  own 
words,  five  cents  a  piece,  but,  brave  lad,  seldom 
takes  them  back.  This  is  no  fish  story.  If  you 
don't  believe  me,  run  and  read  his  "Open  Sea- 
son." the  fishmen  in  oils,  appetizing  as  sardines, 
put  up  by  X.  C.  Wyeth,  for  Street  &  Smith, 
caterers,  and  the  first  June  number  of  The  Pop- 
ular. Mr.  Kyne  keeps  his  typewriter  hot  and 
humming,  likewise,  the  type  of  Walter  Pater, 
pure  food  law.  writer.  If  the  knocker,  to  whom 
it  has  not  been  opened,  knock  him,  failure  fail  to 
see  what  on  earth  the  editor  sees  in  him,  his  is 
success  w-ith  a  vengeance. 


The  Amazing  Wingfield 

George  Wingfield  of  Nevada  has  become  an 
object   of   universal   interest.    All    over  these 


United  States  men  are  talking  of  the  Nevada 
miner  who  took  under  advisement  his  appoint- 
ment to  a  seat  in  the  Senate  of  the  nation,  and 
finally  decided  that  he  preferred  private  life.  There 
is  hardly  a  newspaper  in  the  country  that  hasn't 
expressed  its  wonder  at  his  incredible  incertitude. 
It  is  hard  for  some  of  them  to  conceive  of  a 
man  being  at  all  disinclined  to  accept  the  high 
honor  which  some  men  would  give  millions  to 
attain.  Men  have  struggled  through  many  years 
for  a  seat  in  the  Senate.  It  has  cost  men  for- 
tunes to  get  what  came  unsolicited  to  Wingfield 
only  to  find  him  indifferent  and  in  doubt  as  to 
the  advisability  of  accepting  it.  There  are  men 
in  the  Senate  so  eager  to  remain  there  that  they 
have  sacrificed  their  self-respect  on  the  altar  of 
popularity.  There  are  men  who  have  made  the 
Senate  the  goal  of  their  ambition,  who  would 
spend  a  million  to  get  there,  who  have  worn  a 
mask  through  the  years  in  the  hope  of  getting 
there,  and  to  whom  nothing  shall  ever  come  but 
disappointment.  So,  what  manner  of  man  is  this 
Nevada  miner  who  is  so  slow  to  be  enticed  by 
the  glitter  of  the  Capital  from  the  dust  and 
alkali  of  the  sagebrush  State?  This  is  the  ques- 
tion the  big  dailies  of  the  East  have  been  an- 
swering. Space  writers  have  been  making  money 
off  what  information  they  possess  regarding 
George  Wingfield.  Whole  pages  of  the  New 
York  dailies  have  been  devoted  to  the  romantic 
career  of  this  somewhat  odd  young  man. 


From  Poverty  to  Affluence 

At  twenty-six  years  of  age  George  Wingfield 
was  penniless.  He  had  been  a  cowboy  in 
Oregon,  had  dealt  faro  in  the  Klondike  and 
roughed  it  in  Nevada.  One  day  he  was  grub- 
staked by  Senator  Nixon.  In  four  years  he  was 
worth  about  $30,000,000.  The  first  bit  of  money 
he  made  was  in  a  poker  game.  He  got  up  from 
the  table  $1,800  winner.  The  next  day  with  his 
winnings  as  a  bank  roll  he  founded  the  Tonopah 
Club,  destined  to  become  the  most  famous 
gambling  house  the  West  has  ever  known.  All 
the  time  he  conducted  that  club  he  scrupulously 
regarded  the  unwritten  law  of  the  grubstake.  One 
half  of  the  winnings  were  banked  to  the  credit 
of  Senator  Nixon.  One  day  Wingfield  quit  the 
faro  bank  and  opened  the  other  kind  of  bank,  and 
he  has  been  a  business  man  ever  since,  with  a 
reputation  for  honesty  and  integrity  in  every 
nook  and  corner  of  Nevada. 


The  Gameness  of  Him 

Wingfield  also  has  a  reputation  for  courage. 
How  well  he  deserves  it  everybody  knows  who 
was  in  Goldfield  in  1906  when  the  young  million- 
aire was  managing  the  Goldfield  Consolidated 
properties.  There  had  been  a  good  deal  of  steal- 
ing in  the  mine.  To  put  a  stop  to  it  Wingfield 
established  "change  rooms"  where  the  miners 
were  required  to  change  from  ordinary  apparel 
to  underground  gear  when  going  on  shift  and 
back  to  ordinary  apparel,  leaving  mining  clothes 
for  inspection,  when  coming  off  shift.  The  men 
struck  as  soon  as  they  were  told  of  the  new  rule. 
Also  they  boycotted  the  Goldfield  News,  a  paper 
that  championed  the  cause  of  the  mine  owners. 
One  day  the  word  went  through  the  streets  of 
Goldfield  that  before  the  day  was  done  George 
Wingfield.  known  to  have  framed  the  order 
against  enforcement  of  which  the  miners  struck, 
would  defy  the  union  and  publicly  purchase  a 
copy  of  the  boycotted  newspaper.  Came  the 
luncheon  hour,  and  Wingfield  strolled  nonchal- 
antly across  Main  street  from  the  Cook  Bank, 
of  which  he  was  vice-president,  to  the  Palm 
restaurant.  Almost  at  the  same  moment  a  news- 
boy took  stand  at  the  entrance  of  the  restaurant, 
a  bundle  of  the  boycotted  newspapers  under  his 
arm.    The  moment  had  arrived  when  the  staying 


It  is  — 

Unrivalled  in  purity — in  the 

qualities  which  make  Pears'  Soap  the 
leading  agent  in  producing  and  maintaining 
a  radiant  beauty  of  complexion.  Low 
in  cost ;    high  in  ail  good  qualities  is 

Pears' 
S  OAP 

,   75c.  a  Cake  for  the  Vnicentei 


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C.   LAL.\NNE  L.  COUT.\RD 

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CO. 

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change,  Oouglas  24  1 1 


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A  dainty  lunch  served  gratuitously  to  ladies  every 
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UNDER  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF 

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Jules  Restaurant 

Special  Lunches  50c  or  a  la  Carte 
Ladies'  Grill  aid  Rooms  for  Parties 

Regular  French  Dinner  with  Wine,  $1.00 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Music 

MONADNOCK  BUILDING 

NEXT  TO  PALACE  HOTEL 
Pbooe  Kearny  1S12 
ALL  CARS  PASS  THE  DOOR       ELEVATOR  SERVICE 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


11 


qualities  of  the  striking  miners  were  to  be  tested. 
Fourteen  hundred  exasperated,  rough  and  ready, 
husky  men,  some  of  whom  were  suspected  of  be- 
ing unpunished  dynamiters  and  murderers,  packed 
the  street  between  restaurant  and  bank,  each  man 
eager  to  enforce  the  penalty  clause  in  the  boy- 
cott order.  In  the  restaurant  George  Wingfield 
finished  his  luncheon,  seemingly  heedless  of  the 
gathering  or  of  the  tense  murmur  that  came 
through  the  near  plate  glass  windows  of  Gold- 
field's  leading  food  emporium.  Paying  his 
reckoning  at  the  end  of  the  meal  he  made  his 
way  to  the  front  door  and  stepped  outside.  At 
the  doorway  he  stood  a  moment  before  his  eyes 
seemed  to  light  on  the  trembling  newsboy  by  his 
side.  Then,  in  quite  a  casual  way,  he  reached 
into  his  pocket,  drew  forth  a  dime  and  exchanged 
it  with  the  newsboy  for  a  copy  of  the  Goldfield 
News.  The  newsboy  made  hot  haste  to  parts 
where  "gats"  were  fewer  and  bullets  less  likely 
to  fly.  His  part  in  the  carefully  staged  drama 
had  been  played.  Oblivious  of  situation,  crowd 
and  surroundings  Wingfield  leaned  against  the 
door  jamb,  and  began  scanning  the  paper. 
There  was  a  mob  murmur  as  the  strikers  shifted 
feet  and  took  a  step  forward.  They  did  not  kill 
instantly  as  many  threatened.  If  executioners 
they  waited  at  least  for  the  offender  to  notice 
their  existence  before  putting  him  to  death. 
Wingfield  read  on.  Nor  did  he  stop  until  he  had 
scanned  the  eight  pages  of  the  paper.  Then, 
folding  it  and  stuffing  it  in  his  pocket,  he  seemed 
to  notice  the  crowd  for  the  first  time.  In  appar- 
ent wonderment  he  glanced  over  the  densely 
packed  "rednecks"  and  then:  "Gangway,  there!" 
As  the  command  flashed  forth  Wingfield's  arms 
went  straight  out  in  front  of  him  and  he  walked 
straight  toward  the  mob.  In  each  clenched  fist 
was  an  11  shot  automatic  revolver.  The  mob  had 
no  time  to  think.  Sure  death  was  there  for  a 
score  or  more  of  its  members.  Silently  and  sul- 
lenly it  parted,  and  George  Wingfield  walked 
through  the  human  alleyway  to  personal  safety 
behind  the  doors  of  his  bank.  The  mob  had 
been  cowed  and  beaten,  and  its  bluff  called  pub- 
licly. In  a  week  the  strike  ended,  the  miners 
acceding  to  the  mine  owners'  requirement.  One 
man  had  done  in  Goldfield  what  was  only  ac- 
complished in  the  Coeur  d'Alene  by  United 
States  regulars,  and  in  Colorado  by  a  six-years 
warfare,  in  which  the  entire  State  militia  aided 
the  mine  owners.  And  the  man  who  turned  the 
trick  in  Goldfield  was  only  31  years  old,  raw  in 
the  game  of  mining,  rawer  still  in  finance,  but 
estimated  at  the  prevailing  price  of  mining  stocks 
to  be  worth  a  million  dollars  for  every  year  he 
had  lived. 


What's  Going  To  Be  Done 

Former  Speaker  Stanton  came  to  town  the 
other  day  to  find  out  what  was  to  be  done  for 
President  Taft  in  this  section  of  the  country.  He 
is  wondering  whether  the  campaign  is  to  be  per- 


mitted to  languish  for  lack  of  funds  after  the 
manner  of  the  primary  campaign.  Without 
money  there  can  be  no  political  enthusiasm.  And 
there  was  very  little  money  in  sight  during  the 
primary  campaign.  While  the  Johnson  machine 
had  oodles  of  money  and  spent  it  lavishly,  the 
men  who  were  conducting  the  Taft  boom  were 
obliged  to  practice  the  most  rigorous  economy. 
Chairman  Newhall  of  the  financial  committee 
made  desperate  efforts  to  swell  the  campaign  fund, 
but  met  with  discouragement  everywhere.  Mr. 
Stanton  says  his  experience  was  the  same  in  Los 
Angeles.  "But,"  he  adds,  "I  think  we  shall  find 
money  a  little  easier  now.  The  men  who  have 
been  having  the  benefit  of  the  protective  tariff 
for  years  in  Southern  California  are  bound  to 
wake  up  and  loosen  up.  This  is  naturally  the 
most  hidebound  protection  State  in  the  Union, 
and  the  protected  interests  must  perceive  the 
urgency  of  getting  together  and  supporting  the 
straight  Republican  ticket.  President  Taft's 
friends  are  wondering  whether  the  directors  of 
the  Panama-Pacific  Exposition  will  continue  to 
pay  deference  to  the  selfish  interests  of  Governor 
Johnson.  There  has  been  a  good  deal  of  criticism 
of  the  men  who,  though  willing  enough  to  ac- 
knowledge their  obligations  to  the  President, 
have  done  nothing  to  further  his  political 
interests.  The  only  one  of  them  who  took  an 
active  interest  in  the  primary  campaign  was 
James  McNab,  and  he  certainly  was  an  in- 
dustrious worker.  In  some  quarters  it  is  believed 
that  the  National  Committee  will  pay  a  little  at- 
tention to  California  in  this  campaign  and  suc- 
ceed in  stirring  up  the  men  who  are  indebted  to 
the  party. 


Hadley  a  Comer 

The  most  level-headed  of  all  of  Roosevelt's 
followers  in  Chicago  was  Governor  Hadley  of 
Missouri,  and  his  refusal  to  continue  to  further 
the  ambition  of  the  Third  Termer  was  the  sever- 
est blow  that  gentleman  suffered.  Hadley  is  a 
man  to  be  kept  in  view.  He  is  only  forty  years 
of  age.  In  temperament,  he  is  warranted  by 
Missourians  as  being  absolutely  safe  and  non- 
e.xplosive.  This  should  not  be  construed  to  read 
that  he  lacks  stamina,  moral  or  physical.  Quite 
the  contrary;  Hadley's  success  in  his  own  State 
has  been  due  to  unobtrusive  persistency  in  the 
pursuit  of  a  fixed  purpose.  He  started  out  to 
"clean  up"  Missouri,  and  his  party  believes  that 
he  did  it.  He  is  not  a  political  handshaker;  he  is 
a  worker  in  the  vineyard  who  brings  home  the 
grapes.  Hadley  first  attracted  attention  as  Cir- 
cuit Attorney  of  Jackson  County,  Mo.,  when  he 
prosecuted  successfully  a  number  of  City  Hall 
"grafters"  and  Kansas  City  gamblers.  For  a 
while  his  work  in  that  respect  was  overshadowed 
by  the  greater  achievements  of  Joseph  Folk,  the 
militant  reformer  who  looks  like  pictures  of 
Napoleon.  Folk  was  Circuit  Attorney  of  St. 
Louis,  and  had  just  sent  nineteen  "boodling"  Al- 


Telaphona  Kearny  11 


Armor  Plate  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

OF  UNION  SAFE  DEPOSIT  COMPANY  IN  BUILDING  OF 

Union  Trust  Company 
=  of  San  Francisco  = 

JUNCTION  OF 

MARKET  and  O'FARRELL  STS. 
and  GRANT  AVE. 

Largest,  Stronge»t  and  Most  Conveniently 
Arranged  Safe  Deposit  West  of  New  York 

BOXES  $4.00  PER  ANNUM  AND  UPWARDS 


A  GOOD  JUDGE 

of  fine  whiskey 
pronounces 


HUNTER 


5*ltimoreI1ye 

V    Baltimore,  y 


BALTIMORE 


RYE 


A  Perfect  Product  of 
the  Still,  Because 
Whiskey  Cannot  Be 
More  Carefully  Made, 
Aged  and  Perfected 


Sold  at  nil  first-clafis  cafes 

and  by  jobbers. 
VVM.  LANAHAN  &  SON. 
Baltimore,  Md. 


i 


HOTEL  ARGONAUT 

Society  of  California  Pioneers  Building 
FOURTH  STREET  NEAR  MARKET 

California's  Most  Popular  Hotel 


400  Rooms,  200  Baths;  European  Plan;  $1.00  per  Day 
and  up.  Dining  Room  Seating  500.  Table  d'hote  or  a 
la  carte  service  as  desired. 

Special  Sunday  Dinner,  including  Wine,  $1.00 

Edward  Rolkin,  Mgr.  Geo.  A.  Oixon,  Asst.  Mgr. 


dermen  to  the  State  penitentiary  when  Hadley 
was  heard  of  by  people  living  outside  his  own 
county.  Both  men  were  laboring  in  the  same 
field,  with  tiie  same  kind  of  tools,  and  both  were, 
in  the  opinion  of  Missourians,  worthy  of  their 
hire.  But  because  of  his  greater  opportunities 
in  the  largest  city  in  the  State,  the  Democrat  got 
away  from  the  tape  first  in  the  race  for  popular 
favor.  Folk  was  nominated  by  Democrats  and 
elected  Governor  in  the  same  year  that  Hadley 
was  nominated  by  Republicans  and  elected  At- 
torney-General by  both  Democrats  and  Repub- 
licans. Yet  Hadley  received  the  greater  honor 
in  that  ho  was  the  first  Republican  Attorney- 
General  since  the  days  of  what  in  Missouri  is  al- 
ways called  "the  infamous  Drake  Constitution." 
The  bushes  were  full  of  Democratic  ex-Gov- 
ernors. For  a  while  the  rivalry  between  the  two 
young  attorneys,  Folk  and  Hadley,  attracted  at- 
tention. Members  of  both  parties  sang  their 
praises.  Then  there  appeared  a  rift  in  the 
Democratic  pitch-pipe,  and  it  became  plain  that 
some  powerful  voices  in  the  Democratic  chorus 
were  straying  from  the  key.  The  Republicans, 
however,  stayed  with  Hadley.  They  were  heart- 
ened by  the  Joshua  who  had  led  them  to  their 
first  victory  in  forty  years.  There  could  be  but 
one  conclusion  to  such  a  race — Hadley  was  sure 
to  win.    He  did. 


Fire  of  Big  Guns 

All  the  way  from  Vienna  comes  the  Baronness 
von  Suttner,  bearing  in  her  mouth,  so  to  speak, 
the  olive  branch  grown  in  the  blood-rich  soil  of 
Germany,  land  of  Krupp  and  Kaiser,  to  us  pas- 
sively rcsistent  Californians,  with  a  host  of 
prodigious  maxims  preaching  down  the  hearts 


12 


TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


of  the  sons  of  Mars,  and  with  an  ardor  more 
glorious  than  that  of  war  itself.  The  local  dove 
is  all  aflutter  and  a-preening  of  her  feathers. 
Against  the  sword's  might  slie  pits  the  tongue, 
and  her  woman's  weapon  is  fine-edged  as  a  prun- 
inghook  of  unturnable  Damascus.  Ruthlessly, 
doing  herself  and  her  cause  poetic  justice,  she 
runs  her  well-turned  ploughshare  througli  the 
best  laid  military  plans  of  men,  telling  them  in 
time  of  war  to  prepare  for  peace.  Daughter  and 
wife  of  the  regiment,  praying  God  and  keeping 
her  powder  dry,  the  baroness  wages  war  on  war 
and  death  and  incidentally  earns  living  wages. 
Rising  erstwhile  in  her  righteous  indignation, 
Bertha  von  Suttner  took  in  hand  her  subject 
and  her  mightier-than-the-sword,  to  the  end  that 
we  might  lay  down  our  arms  or  ever  the  cannon 
ball  shot  oflF  our  legs,  and  just  to  prove  that 
peace  has  her  victories  no  less  than  war,  won 
the  Nobel  prize  and  the  pretty  penny  of  $40,000. 
That  the  baroness  was  justly  entitled  to  the 
honor  and  the  honorarium,  no  one  that  has  read 
her  "Ground  Arms"  and  knows  the  history  of 
the  noble  endowment,  doubts  for  a  hostile 
moment.  The  book  is  an  eloquent  appeal  to 
man's  better  nature  to  seek  and  ensue  her  whose 
paths  are  pleasantness,  lined  with  tree  of  fair- 
est fruit  in  lieu  of  ambushes.  'Tis  extremely 
captivating,  a  cultured  antitoxin  for  the  bacillus 
belli.  The  enemy  is  utterly  routed,  his  stock-in- 
trade  arguments  arc  shot  all  to  pieces,  the  dust 
is  bit  of  the  biter,  peace  to  his  ashes.  While 
she  gives  us  freely  her  moving  picture  of  peace, 
the  nickel  "odium"  gives  us  its  costly  picture  of 
war,  rumors  whereof  still  reach  our  ears.  If  we 
remember  aright,  sometime  about  the  beginning 
of  this  Era,  a  great  man  dying  in  the  Place  of 
the  Skull,  left  us  a  Pax  Vobiscum  of  irresistible 
persuasion.  Yet  is  the  red  star  in  the  ascendent. 
The  fatherland  at  the  mercy  of  France  the  im- 
memorial foe,  Vienna  invaded,  would  the  author 
of  "Ground  Arms,"  we  wonder,  be  up  in  them, 
play  Tolstoi  of  Lightest  Russia  or  Joan  of  Arc? 


Gingerbread 

Well-made  Gingerbread,  never  soggy,  but 
fluffy  and  light,  delights  the  children  and  is 
pleasing  to  grown-ups.  To  make  it  creamy, 
fluffy  and  light,  use 

BORDEN'S  EAGLE  BRAND 
CONDENSED  MILK 

REriPK— Ueat  oiif-balf  pound  hotter  and  six  onnces  of 
8u«ar  to  arn*ani,ailil  six  well-bfaten  eKUS  atnl  beatUior- 
oiiylily.    Dissolve  une  tfasMountiil  B<»ia  in  a  halt  hot 
wuter,  add  it  t"  two  rnps  molasses;  nilx  and  stir  into  the 
first  mixture;  then  add  six  tabiespootifnla  Ka^le  Hrand 
C">ndeiiKt'd  Milk  diluted  with  one 
and  three-foui  ths  cups  water,  and 
one  cjnart  and  a  pint  of  iUtwr.  Heat 
smooth,  add  two  heaptnf;  tahle- 
sp'toiifuls  of   KinnPr.  mix,  ponr 
into  wi'll -greased  shallow  pans 
and  hakf  in  a  moderateoven  about 
forty  minutes. 

Write  for  Borden's  RtdpeBooh 

BORDEN'S 
CONDENSED  MILK  CO. 

"Leaders  of  Quality'* 

Est.  1857  New  York 


Alexander  the  Great 

We  have  with  us  in  the  flesh,  as  we  once  had 
Henry  Holmes,  a  great  teacher.  Great  teacliers 
are  rare  as  the  name  Agassiz.  So  to  have  Herr 
Heinemann  with  us,  held  thrall  by  the  charms 
of  our  city  is  no  small  blessing.  Herr  Heine- 
mann does  not  teach  violin,  he  teaches  voice,  so 
we'll,  in  such  wise,  that  the  taught  with  one  ac- 
cord lift  up  their  voices  and  call  him  blessed. 
He  makes  no  secret  of  how  he  does  it.  But 
"Go  thou  and  do  likewise!"  is  easier  said  than 
done.  His  method  is  not  German  as  opposed  to 
Italian,  or  any  odorous  nonsense  of  the  sort,  but 
the  method  of  gifted  intelligence,  of  him  that 
knows  what  he's  talking  about,  as  opposed  to 
gab-gifted  pretention.  Method  is  one  thing,  re- 
sult, another;  as  is  to  sing  a  liedcr  and  to  make 
you  sing  it.  Many  a  teacher  has  to  all  seeming 
and  sounding,  a  like  method,  but  none,  I'm  told, 
a  like  result.  Again,  I  do  not  have  to  ask  you 
to  take  my  word  for  it.  'Tis  Rivalry  that  speaks. 
I  but  report.  Do  you  see  many  ads  in  the  news- 
papers for  love  lost  between  singing-teachers? 
Noticeably  few  and  far  between  as  angels'  visit. 
'Tis  a  year  now  since  Herr  Heinemann,  the  good 
angel  Heinemann,  visited  us,  till  he  come  again 
will  be  another.  The  great  singing  master  does 
not  claim  to  be  a  Svengali,  though  he  thinks  he 
looks  like  one.  Heinemann  thinks  a  good  deal, 
but  not  much  of  the  brains  of  Apollos,  and,  in- 
cidentally, himself  the  ugliest  of  men.  With  no 
world  of  music  to  conquer,  the  great  .Mexander 
is  all  smiles.  Born  to  make  a  noise  in  the  world, 
the  least  disagreeable,  he  has  fulfilled  his  destiny 
and  the  delighted  cars  of  the  critics.  Pearls  of 
pianissimo  fall  from  his  lips.  He  whispers  his 
own  voice  into  your  ear  for  music  and  draws 
yours,  if  you  have  one  of  your  own,  out  of  your 
mouth.  If  voice  you  haven't,  he  is  like  as  not 
to  tell  you  to  go  home,  cook,  and  keep  your  good 
money  for  grand  opera  tickets,  your  role  being 
obviously  that  of  the  listener.  He  may  even 
ofTer  you  your  money  back,  and  some  of  his  to 
boot,  for  time  pre-empted.  We  do  not  make  it 
so  hot  for  him  here  as  to  cause  him  to  "schwindle," 
that  is  to  say,  faint,  as  he  needs  must  where  it 
is  too  warm.  Herr  Heinemann  has  English  words 
for  our  equitable  climate.  For  our  voices  he 
must  needs  fall  back  on  the  German.  Incom- 
parably glorious  he  finds  them.  We  don't  know 
how  well  off  we  arc  in  this  matter  of  natively 
beautiful  voices.  But  some  of  us  do  know  when 
we're  well  off.  I  know  of  some  seven  w-ise  vir- 
gins and  matrons  who  are  willing  to  go  hatless 
till  Easter  next,  in  order  to  sit  at  his  feet  and 
gatlier  the  pearls  aforesaid  or  sung.  I'rom 
morn  to  night  he  works  like  a  lumnd, 
without  eating,  mixing  much  humor  witli  the 
pathos  inseparable  from  voice-building,  regaling 
himself  from  time  to  time  with  black  coffee  and 
cofTec-colored  cigar. 


Getting  Ready  for  the  New  Era 

Tlic  consolidation  of  the  pioneer  houses  of  the 
H.  S.  Crocker  Company  and  Cunningham,  Cur- 
tiss  &  Welch  is  a  matter  of  some  significance. 

EVERY  LUNCH  BASKET 

should  contain  a  couple  of  split  bottles  of  Itali.in- 
Swiss  Colony  TlPO  (red  or  white).  They  will 
make  cold  lunch  digestible. 


The 


Egyptiotn 
CigdLrette 
of  Quality 

AR.OMAT1C  DELICACY 
MILDNESS 
PURITY 


At  your  Club  or  Dealer's  or 
THE  SURBRUa  CO.,  Maker*.  New  York 


It  was  doubtless  effected  by  way  of  anticipation. 
The  trade  of  the  near  future  will  be  handled  in 
San  Francisco  as  it  is  now  handled  in  New  York 
— by  firms  able  to  take  care  of  a  vast  volume 
(  f  business.  The  members  of  the  two  pioneer 
1  ook,  stationery  and  printing  houses  looked  into 
the  future,  and  decided  to  be  ready  to  do  busi- 
ness on  the  scale  that  will  soon  be  demanded. 
The  probability  is  they  will  expand  their  manu- 
facturing departments,  and  certainly  they  will  cut 
a  big  figure  in  the  trade  of  the  whole  coast,  as 
they  will  have  branch  houses  in  Los  Angeles, 
Sacramento,  Portland  and  Seattle.  I  hear  that 
Ji  hn  Gilmartin  will  be  general  manager  of  the 
new  concern.  Gilmartin  has  been  secretary  of 
the  Crocker  Company  for  many  years.  He  is  a 
shrewd  business  man  of  rare  executive  ability, 
affable  and  popular,  in  every  sense  qualified  for 
his  new  and  important  position. 


Delegates  Visit  Oakland 

.Many  of  the  delegates  to  the  biennial  conven- 
tion of  Women's  Clubs  w-ent  sight-seeing  in  Oak- 
land and  confessed  themselves  charmed  by  the 
many  beautiful  homes  and  home-sites  on  the 
other  side  of  the  bay.  They  were  especially  en- 
thusiastic on  the  trip  over  the  forest  slopes  of 
Rockridge  Terrace  with  its  many  viewpoints 
wlicnce  may  be  seen  so  many  and  varied  stretches 
of  landscape  and  marinescape.  In  Rockridge  is 
to  be  seen  a  very  fine  example  of  the  "group 
building"  movement  which  has  become  the  hobby 
of  the  landscape  artist,  and  that  is  one  reason 
why  the  tract  is  now  exciting  a  great  deal  of  in- 
terest. 


MURPHY,  GRANT  &  CO. 

WHOLESALE  DRY  GOODS 

FLRNISHIXG  GOODS,  NOTIONS, 
WHITE   GOODS,  LACES. 

Northeast  corner  BUSH  and  SANSOME  STS. 

S.\X  FRj\NCISCO 


Thru  Railroad  Tickets 


Issued  to  All  Parts  of 


PORTLAND 

Sails  12  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $10,  $12,  $15.    2d  class  $6.00. 

The  San  Francisco  and  Portland  S.  S.  Co. 

.\.   OTTIN-GF.R.  General  Agent. 


United  States,  Canada  and  Mexico 

In  connection  with   These   Magnificent   Passenger  Steamers 

LOS  ANGELES 

Sails  11  a.  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $8.35.     2d  class  $5.35. 

Ticket  Office,  722  Market.    Phone  Sutter  2344 
8    East    Street,    opp.    Ferry    Building.    Phone    Sutter  2482 
lUrkcIcy     Office.     2105     Sh.ittuck.       Phone     Rerkeley  331 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


13 


STATEMENT 

of  the  Condition  and  Value  of  the  Assets  and  LiabiHties  of 

The  Hibemia  Savings  and  Loan  Society 


HIBERNIA  BANK 

(A  CORPORATION) 
(Member  of  the  Associated  Savings  Banks  of  San  Francisco) 


DATED  JUNE  30,  1912 


ASSETS 

1—  Bonds  of  the  United  States  ($8,585,000.00),  of  the 

State  (if  California  and  Municipalities  thereof 
($4,091,137.50),  of  the  State  of  New  York 
($650,000.00),  the  actual  value  of  which  is  $14,566,400.65 

2 —  Cash  in  United  States  Gold  and  Silver  Coin  and 

Checks   $1,785,621.29 

3—  Miscellaneous    Bonds    ($6,185,000.00),    the  actual 

value  of  which  is   $6,200,644.06 

$22,552,666.00 

They  are: 

"San  Francisco  and  North  Pacific  Railway  Com- 
pany 5  per  cent  Bonds"  ($476,000.00),  "Southern 
Pacific  Branch  Railway  Company  of  California 
6  per  cent  Bonds"  ($306,000.00),  "Southern 
Pacific  Company,  San  Francisco  Terminal  4  per 
cent  Bonds"  ($150,000.00),  "Western  Pacific 
Railway  Company  5  per  cent  Bonds"  ($250,- 
OOO.OO),  "San  Francisco  and  San  Joaquin  Valley 
Railway  Company  5  per  cent  IBonds"  ($120,- 
000.00),  "Northern  California  Railway  Company 

5  per  cent  Bonds"  ($83,000.00),  "Northern  Rail- 
way Company  of  California  5  per  cent  Bonds" 
($54,000.00),  "Market  Street  Cable  Company  6 
per  cent  Bonds  ($758,000.00),  "Market  Street 
Railway  Company  First  Consolidated  5  per  cent 
Bonds"  ($753,000.00),  "Los  Angeles  Pacific  Rail- 
road Company  of  California  Refunding  5  per 
cent  Bonds"  ($400,000.00),  "Los  Angeles  Rail- 
way Company  of  California  5  per  cent  Bonds" 
($334,000.00),  "The  Omnibus  Cable  Company  6 
per  cent  Bonds"  ($167,000.00),  "Sutter  Street 
Railway  Company  5  per  cent  Bonds"  ($150,- 
000.00),  "Gough  Street  Railway  Company  5  per 
cent  Bonds"  ($20,000.00),  "Ferries  and  Cliflf 
House  Railway  Company  6  per  cent  Bonds" 
($6000.00),  "San  Francisco,  Oakland  and  San 
Jose  Railway  Company  5  per  cent  Bonds" 
($5000.00),  "The  Merchants'  Exchange  7  per 
cent  Bonds"  ($1,450,000.00),  "San  Francisco  Gas 

6  Electric  Company  4^  per  cent  Bonds" 
($553,000.00),  "Los  Angeles  Gas  &  Electric 
Company  5  per  cent  Bonds"  ($100,000.00), 
"Spring  Valley  Water  Company  4  per  cent 
Bonds"  ($50,000.00). 

4 —  Promissory  Notes  and  the  debts  thereby  secured, 

the  actual  value  of  which  is  $32,260,268.29 

The  condition  of  said  Promissory  Notes  and 
debts  is  as  follows:  They  are  all  existing  Con- 
tracts, owned  by  said  Corporation  and  are  pay- 
able to  it  at  its  office  which  is  situated  at  the 
corner  of  Market,  McAllister  and  Jones  Streets, 
in  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State 
of  California,  and  the  payment  thereof  is  secured 
by  First  Mortgages  on  Real  Estate  within  this 
State.  Said  Promissory  Notes  are  kept  and  held 
by  said  Corporation  at  its  said  office,  which  is  it 
principal  place  of  business,  and  said  Notes  and 
debts  are  there  situated. 


5—  Promissory  Notes  and  the  debts  thereby  secured, 

the  actual  value  of  which  is  '  $297,879.00 

The  condition  of  said  Promissory  Notes  and 
debts  is  as  follows:  They  are  all  existing  Con- 
tracts, owned  by  said  Corporation,  and  are  pay- 
able to  it  at  its  office,  which  is  situated  as  afore- 
said, and  the  payment  tliereof  is  secured  by 
pledge  and  hypothecation  of  Bonds  of  Rail- 
road and  Quasi-Public  Corporations  and  other 
securities. 

6—  (a)  Real  Estate  situated  in  the  City  and  County  of 

San  Francisco  ($1,035,150.97),  and  in  the 
Counties  of  Santa  Clara  ($13,891.54),  Alameda 
($2997.80)  and  of  Los  Angeles  ($5,396.62),  in 

this  State,  the  actual  value  of  which  is   $1,057,436.93 

(b)  The  Land  and  Building  in  which  said  Corpora- 
tion keeps  its  said  office,  the  actual  value  of 

"''li^h       ■  ,  :-y   $976,089.93 

1  he  Condition  of  said  Real  Estate  is  that  it 
belongs  to  said  Corporation  and  part  of  it  is 
productive. 

7 —  Accrued  Interest  on  Loans  and  Bonds   $276,496.47 

TOTAL  ASSETS   ...$57,420,836.62 


LIABILITIES 

1—  Said  Corporation  Owes  Deposits  amounting  to  and 

the  actual   value  of  which   is  $54,099  874  46 

(Number  of  Depositors,  83,378;  Average  Amount 
Deposits,  $648.45.) 

2 —  Contingent  Fund — Accrued  Interest 

on  Loans  and  Bonds   $276,496.47 

3—  Reserve  Fund,  Actual  value  $3,044,465.69  $3,320,962.16 

TOTAL  LIABILITIES   ...$57,420,836.62 

THE  HIBERNIA  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  SOCIETY, 

By  JAMES   R.   KELLY,  President. 
THE  HIBERNIA  SAVINGS  &  LOAN  SOCIETY, 

By  R.  M.  TOBIN,  Secretary. 


STATE   OF  CALIFORNIA, 
City   and   County  of  San   Francisco — ss. 

JAMES  R.  KELLY  and  R.  M.  TOI'.IN,  being  each  duly  sworn,  each  for 
himself,  says:  That  said  J.\MES  R.  KELLY  is  I'rcsident  and  that  said 
R.  M.  TOBIN  is  Secretary  of  THE  IIIHERNIA  SAVINGS  AND  LOAN 
SOCIETY,  the  Corporation  above  mentioned,  and  that  the  foregoing  state- 
ment is  true. 

JAMES  R.  KELLY,  President. 
R.  M.  TOBIN,  Secretary. 

Subscribed  and  sworn  to  before  me  this  1st  day  of  July,  1912. 

CHARLES  T.  STANLEY, 
Notary  Public  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco,  State  of  California. 


14 


TOWN    TALK  juiy  6.  1912 


Social  Prattle 


It's  a  Love  Match 

Her  friends  duwn  tlic  peninsula  are  saying  that 
Dan  Cupid  has  made  a  new  woman  out  of  Jenny 
Crocker;  that  is,  the  lovc-sniitten  maiden,  they 
say,  who  was  once  whimsical,  capricious  and 
frivolous  is  now  as  sedate  and  prim  as  a  Pilgrim 
daughter.  According  to  reports  from  every  re- 
liable, authentic  source  Jennie  Crocker  has  been 
touched  by  the  divine  spark.  It  used  to  be  said 
that  she  was  destined  to  bachelorhood  because 
she  was  fearful  of  being  married  for  her  money. 
It  is  her  good  fortune  to  be  loved  by  a  man  who 
has  as  much  money  a.s  herself,  and  so  thcir's  is 
the  genuine  love-match  that  isn't  made  every  day. 
And  ever  since  it  was  made  the  Californian  heiress 
has  been  bubbling  over  with  sentiment. 


Her  Fiance  Arrives 

Malcolm  Whitman  arrived  from  the  East  in 
time  to  spend  the  Fourth  with  his  fiancee  at  San 
Mateo,  and  the  young  couple  are  being  entertained 
right  and  left.  At  the  last  moment  Miss  Crocker 
had  decided  not  to  go  to  Chicago  for  her  brother- 
in-Iaw-to-be's  marriage  to  Miss  Chatfield  Taylor 
last  week,  but  she  welcomed  her  betrothed  at  the 
Oakland  mole  on  his  arrival  and  accompanied  him 
to  Uplands  where  he  is  the  guest  of  the  Temple- 
ton  Crockers  who  gave  a  large  dinner  in  his 
honor  on  the  fifth.  The  Crockers  came  all  the 
way  from  Honolulu  for  sister  Jennie's  wedding 
and  will  return  after  Templeton  has  given  the 
bride  into  the  groom's  keeping  on  the  sixteenth. 
Mrs.  Walter  Martin  has  invited  a  house-party  to 
Stag's  Leap  to  meet  the  New  Yorker  who  is 
carrying  off   the   little   California  heiress. 


Our  Beautiful  Women 

The  beauty  of  women!  A  fine  phrase  that,  and 
pregnant  with  inspiration.  Especially  beautiful, 
says  sweet  Baroness  von  Suttner,  are  the  women 
of  California.  Isn't  she  the  dear?  She  attributes  the 
heroic  size,  the  brilliant  minds  and  exquisite  pol- 
ish of  our  women  to  our  wonderful  climate. 
Which  somewhat  leads  me  to  think  that  she  took 
as  typical  one  of  the  ladies  she  met  at  Mrs. 
Eleanor  Martin's  tea — the  fairest,  most  brilliant 
and  most  polished  of  all  of  them.  No,  her  name 
I  keep  to  myself,  for  she  adds  to  her  other  qual- 
ities the  noblest  of  all  of  them—modesty.  To  be 
sure  we  have  not  a  few  woman  of  the  kind  de- 
scribed by  the  Baroness,  and  I  quite  agree  with 
her  that  our  women  have  the  lusciousness  of  our 
fruits  and  the  spirit  of  our  clear,  blue  warm 
skies.  But  their  beauty  is  something  more  than 
climatic.    As  our  population  is  a  fusion  of  many 


^PRONOUNCED  DEAR  Xjy-S'S'V^ 

cancefvtxcc  «At  f  atliaiii  tie  ce 
paa|um,  tju*  moinA  tl'une  ^avAin 


AU, 


TRANSLATION:  "So  concentr.lrd  ii  the 
fracrancc  ol  this  perfuim:,  that  Icii  than  a  drop 
suffices." 


At  all  dri'cM.    Sen  I  V.  for  Sample  of  Extract. 


By  TANTALUS 

climes,  so  is  the  beauty  of  the  women.  Here  are 
to  be  seen  the  lissom  Greek  figure  of  the  Sicil- 
ian, the  flashing  black  eyes  of  Spain,  the  win- 
someness  of  the  daintiest  Parisienne,  the  wild- 
rose  bloom  and  hill-wind  freshness  of  the  Eng- 
lish downs  and  the  hair  touched  with  gold  and 
eyes  haunted  by  a  living  memory  of  the  Kil- 
larney  sky. 


Our  Comely  Buds 

Now  that  the  fashionable  schools  are  closed  for 
the  summer  the  beauty  of  our  young  girls  is  much 
in  evidence.    How  many  there  are  of  these  buds 


I'hoto,  Uentlie 

MISS  liLANCIIE  ML'RR..\Y 
Daughter  of  the  Duncan  Stanley  Murrays,  one  of 
San   Francisco's   beautiful  buds. 

to  whom  the  gift  of  loveliness  has  been  vouch- 
safed. I  have  before  me  a  photograph  of  one, 
which  is  reproduced  on  the  printed  page — Miss 
Blanche  Murray,  daughter  of  the  Duncan  Stan- 
ley Murrays,  just  out  of  the  West  school  and  now 
to  pursue  her  studies  under  the  guidance  of 
special  teachers,  after  which  she  will  go  to  Eng- 
land where  her  father  has  very  high  social  con- 
nections. Besides  being  a  beauty  Miss  Murray 
has  the  benefit  of  a  rearing  in  sweetest,  old- 
time  simplicity,  which  makes  for  an  indescribable 
air  of  loveliness,  so  often  found  wanting  in  the 
bud  of  the  period  in  whom  very  often  priggish 
precocity  is  a  painful  characteristic. 


The  Baroness  and  the  Man 

I  met  a  gentleman  who  met  Baroness  von  Sutt- 
ner at  the  Martin  tea,  where  by  the  way,  the 
hostess  was  assisted  in  receiving  by  Mrs.  Garret 
McEnerney  and  Mrs.  Henry  T.  Ferguson. 
Though  the  gentleman  doesn't  take  the  peace 
propaganda  seriously,  the  Baroness  he  does.  He 
pronounces  her  one  of  the  sweetest  women  he 
ever  met.  "She  talked  to  me,"  he  said,  "of  the 
horrors  of  war,  and  she  put  up  a  mighty  stiff  argu- 
ment in  favor  of  universal  peace,  and  I  was  sorely 
tempted  to  emulate  Disraeli.  You  know  Dis- 
raeli listened  one  day  to  a  beautiful  vifoman  who 
held  forth  on  the  rights  of  women.    She  grew 


more  beautiful  as  her  eyes  flashed  in  the  course 
of  her  impassioned  argument.  Disraeli  listened 
spellbound.  The  lady  thought  she  was  making 
a  convert  of  the  eminent  man.  When  she  finished 
he  exclaimed,  'You  darling!'  It's  related  that 
she  was  very  much  displeased,  being  prouder  of 
her  intellect  than  of  her  beauty." 


Miss  Buckley's  Mystery 

There  was  some  mystery  about  the  engagement 
of  Miss  Buckley,  the  pretty  navy  belle  who  ar- 
rived from  Honolulu  last  week  and  declined  at 
first  to  divulge  the  name  of  her  betrothed.  Be- 
fore she  departed  for  the  East  the  young  lady  ac- 
knowledged that  her  heart  and  hand  were  prom- 
ised to  Bayard  Hyde  Smith  who  is  well  known 
in  local  society.  She  will  return  to  Honolulu 
where  the  young  man  is  engaged  in  business,  to 
be  married  at  the  home  of  her  step-father.  Com- 
mander Gill,  U.  S.  N.  Bayard  Hyde  Smith  comes 
of  one  of  the  best  known  families  in  the  State. 
His  grand-father  for  whom  Hyde  street  was 
named  was  the  first  alcalde  of  San  Francisco  and 
his  grandmother  was  a  famous  Spanish  beauty, 
related,  I  believe,  to  the  Castro  family.  His  sis- 
ters are  Mrs.  Baldwin  Wood  of  this  city  and  Mrs. 
Harold  Dillingham  of  Honolulu  who  is  at  pres- 
ent visiting  Mrs.  Templeton  Crocker.  Mrs.  Alex- 
ander Garceau  is  the  young  man's  aunt  and  Mrs. 
Will  Horne  of  San  Rafael  is  his  cousin.  He  has 
been  in  Honolu  for  the  past  year  engaged  in  busi- 
ness with  his  brother-in-law.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Har- 
old Dillingham  came  up  on  the  same  steamer  with 
Miss  Buckley  and  will  remain  for  the  Crocker- 
Whitman  nuptials  on  the  sixteenth.  They  will 
sail  for  the  islands  the  latter  part  of  the  month 
when  the  Templeton  Crockers  will  return  to  com- 
plete their  summer  visit. 


Cupid's  Quick  Action 

Fred  Knight  sailed  for  Honolulu  last  week  to 
be  present  at  the  marriage  of  his  step-daughter 
Miss  Thelma  Parker  and  Henry  Gaillard  Smart 


MANZANITA  HALL 

PALO  ALTO.  CALIFORNIA 

Makes  a  specialty  of  preparing  boys  and  young 
men  for  entrance  to  the  universities.  The  location 
adjacent  to  Stanford  I'niversity  and  to  Palo  Alto, 
a  town  of  remarkable  culture,  makes  possible  a  school 
life  of  unusual  advantages  and  privileges. 

Twentieth    year    opens     August     27.     1912.  For 
catalogue  and  specific  information,  address 
W.  A.  SHEDD,  Head  Master 


Puckett's  College  of  Dancing 

Assembly  Hall 

1268  SUTTER  STREET 

between  Van  Neu  and  Polk 

Ji  ^oTc  beautiful  ballroom 
Could    Hardly  Conceived 


Classes— Mondays.  .Assemblies — Frid«yi 

Advance  Class  and  Social— Wednesdays. 

Private  Leaaona 

Hall  for  Rent  Phone  Franklin  1 1 8 


July  6,  1912 

which  will  be  celebrated  at  Waimea,  the  famous 
Parker  plantation  which  yields  the  young  heiress 
an  enormous  revenue.  Harry  Smart  is  the  son  of 
a  poor  Methodist  clergyman  in  Virginia  who 
went  to  Honolulu  to  engage  in  business,  sailing 
from  San  Francisco  on  the  same  steamer  that 
carried  Miss  Parker  and  her  mother  to  the  islands 
several  months  ago.  The  courtship  was  brief  and 
has  been  followed  by  a  brief  engagement  to  cul- 
minate in  the  marriage  on  July  26.  The  young 
couple  will  spend  their  honeymoon  in  the  islands 
returning  to  spend  the  winter  in  this  city. 


The  O'Brien-Pier  Marriage 

The  many  friends  of  Mr.  James  H,  O'Brien 
received  a  surprise  this  week  when  they  received 
from  him  announcement  of  the  marriage  of  his 
beautiful  daughter  Genevieve  and  Mr.  Carl  Har- 
riman  Pier.  This  is  the  third  member  of  the 
O'Brien  family  to  go  to  the  altar  within  the  last 
two  years.  Mrs.  Pier  is  the  sister  of  Mrs.  Hart- 
ley Peart.  She  is  a  very  charming  girl  who  has 
had  the  benefit  of  travel,  having  spent  several 
months  in  Europe  with  her  father  and  her  aunt 
Miss  Kate  Handley  of  Santa  Cruz.  Mr.  Pier  is 
a  Stanford  man,  a  young  lawyer  who  has  already 
won  distinction  in  his  profession.  He  is  now  an 
assistant  to  the  United  States  District  Attorney. 
The  Piers  were  averse  to  a  formal  wedding. 
They  were  married  Wednesday  at  Santa  Clara  by 
Father  Morrissey,  the  President  of  Santa  Clara 
College,  an  old  friend  of  the  O'Brien  family. 
The  young  folk  are  spending  their  honeymoon 
at  Del  Monte. 


Illness  of  Laura  Baldwin 

I  am  told  that  the  health  of  Miss  Laura  Bald- 
win which  has  given  her  family  deep  concern  in 
the  past  two  years  is  greatly  improved.  Now  it  is 
hoped  she  will  be  able  to  be  an  attendant  at  her 
sister's  wedding  to  James  Lowe  Hall  in  Novem- 
ber. Laura  and  Mildred  Baldwin  are  the  beauti- 
ful daughters  of  A.  S.  Baldwin  who  has  amassed 
a  fortune  in  San  Francisco  real  estate  and  owns 
a  mansion  in  Presidio  Terrace.  Mildred,  the 
younger,  has  been  devoted  to  her  sister  during 
the  latter's  invalidism  following  an  attack  of 
typhoid  which  left  her  partially  crippled  by  an 
affection  of  the  nerves  of  the  feet.  A  few  weeks 
ago  on  her  return  from  Europe  she  underwent  an 
operation  at  Adler's  and  the  results  are  said  to 
have  been  highly  satisfactory  with  every  hope  that 
this  pretty  and  charming  young  girl  will  soon  be 
completely  restored  to  health.  After  her  mar- 
riage Miss  Mildred  Baldwin's  home  will  be  in 
Grand  Rapids,  Michigan,  where  Hall  has  exten- 
sive lumber  interests  but  she  has  declared  her  in- 
tention of  making  frequent  visits  to  California. 


TOWN  TALK 

'Winslow- Wallace  Wedding 

One  of  the  weddings  of  the  month  will  be  that 
of  Mrs.  Sarah  Stetson  Winslow  and  Colonel 
Hamilton  Wallace,  U.  S.  A.  It  will  be  very  quiet 
with  only  relatives  and  a  few  intimate  friends 
present.  Mrs.  Winslow  who  is  a  daughter  of  the 
late  J.  B.  Stetson,  chief  owner  of  the  California 
street  cable  system,  was  divorced  from  her  first 
husband,  Chauncey  Rose  Winslow,  the  father  of 
Miss  Rose  Winslow,  one  of  the  popular  debut- 
antes of  last  year.  Winslow  after  married  a  Port- 
land belle  and  his  death  occurred  two  years  ago 
in  the  northern  city.  Mrs.  Robert  Oxnard  who 
was  Nellie  Stetson  is  the  sister  of  Mrs.  Winslow 
and  she  also  was  a  widow,  Mrs.  Ricardo  Pinto, 
when  she  married  Oxnard. 


Photo,  Genthe 


MRS.   C.\RL   H.VRKIMAN  PIER 
She  was  Miss  Genevieve  O'Brien  until  Wednesday  of 
this  week  when  she  became  a  bride  in  Santa  Clara. 

Nellie  Grant  Sartoris 

Mrs.  NelHe  Grant  Sartoris  who  was  married 
Thursday  to  Frank  H.  Jones,  Assistant  Post- 
master General  in  Cleveland's  Administration 
and  now  Secretary  of  a  Chicago  bank,  was  the 
only  daughter  of  President  Ulysses  S.  Grant.  She 
was  married  in  the  White  House  during  her 
father's  Administration  as  President  on  May  21, 
1874  She  was  then  17  years  of  age  and  had  been 
her  father's  favorite.  She  met  Algernon  Sartoris, 
a  member  of  the  British  Diplomatic  Corps,  before 
she  was  even  a  debutante.  The  meeting  took 
place  on  board  the  steamship  Russia,  and  gave 
rise  to  a  romantic  attachment.  Their  marriage 
was  a  brilliant  social  affair.  Mr.  Sartoris  was 
the  son  of  Edward  Sartoris.  His  mother  had 
been  Adelaide  Kemble,  sister  of  Fannie  Kemble 
the  actress.  Mr.  Sartoris  took  his  bride  to  Eng- 
land. He  established  her  in  a  handsome  country 
place  at  Cadogan,  England,  but  their  married  life 
proved  unhappy.  Mr.  Sartoris  died  after  she  had 
borne  him  three  children.  The  eldest  was  Al- 
gernon Sartoris,  who  served  as  a  Captain  in  the 
American  Army,  and  later  as  Consul  to  Guate- 
mala, a  post  he  was  forced  to  resign  because  of 
being  credited  with  supplying  information  to  a 
magazine  which  offended  the  Guatemalan  Gov- 
ernment. The  author  of  the  offending  magazine 
article  denied  that  young  Sartoris  had  furnished 

CANDY  FOR  HER  VACATION.  It  will  add 
to  the  pleasure  of  her  stay  in  the  country.  Can 
be  sent  by  express  from  any  one  of  Geo.  Haas  & 
Sons'  four  candy  stores. 


15 


\  Sutler  1  572  Cyril  Arnautou 

Phones  ,  Home  C-3970  Henry  Rittman 

(  Home  C-478 1  —Hole!  C.  Lahademe 

New  Delmonico's 

Restaurant  and  Hotel 

NOW  OPEN 

Beat  French  Dinner  in  the  City  with  Wine,  51.00 
Banquet  Halls  and  Private  "Dining  Rooms 
Music  Eoeiy  Evening 
Visi  ors  lo  San  Francisco  are  cordially  invited 

362  Geary  Street        San  Francisco 


FIOR  d'lTALIA 

RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN  DINNER  A  SPECIALTY 

The  cuisine  is  unsurpassed.    An  ideal  place 
where  one  can  take  his  family  or  friends. 
Banquet  Rooms  and  Private  Rooms 

492  BROADWAY  ::  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phones:  Douglas  1504        Home  C  1504 


Art  and  Refinement  are  Display  by  Tasteful  Attire 


Makers  of 

LADIES'   GOWNS   AND   FANCY  COSTUMES 
420  SUTTER,  near  STOCKTON  STREET 
San  Francisco,  Cal. 


La  Questa 

One  of  the  FINES!  RED  WINES 

in  the  world.     Served  at  First-Class 
Hotels,  Cafes,  Clubs,  Etc. 

Producer,  E.  H.  RIXFORD 

California-Pacific  Building,   105  Montgomery  St. 
San  Francisco 

Customer — I  wish  you'd  quit  dunning  me  for 
that  suit  of  clothes.  Do  you  object  to  giving  me 
time? 

Tailor — Oh,  no;  but  it  looks  as  if  you  expected 
me  to  give  you  the  suit. 


A  SKIN  OF  BEAUTY  IS  A  JOY  FOREVER 

DR.  T.  FELIX  GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL  CREAM 

OR  MAGICAL  BEAUTIFIER 

Removes  Tan,  Pimples, 
Freckles,  Moth  Patches, 
Rash  and  Skin  Diseases, 
and  every  bemish  on  beauty, 
and  defies  detection.  It  has 
stood  the  test  for  62  years ; 
no  other  has,  and  it  is  so 
harmless  we  taste  it  to  be 
sure  it  is  properly  made. 
The  distinguished  Dr.  L.  A. 
Sayre  said  to  a  lady  of  the 
haut-ton  (a  patient) :  "As 
you  ladies  will  use  them, 
I  recommend  'Gouraud's  Cream'  as  the  last  harmful  of 
all  the  skin  preparations. 

For  Sale  by  all  Druggists  and  Fancy  Good  Dealers 
GOURAUD'S  ORIENTAL  TOILET  POWDER 
For  infants  and  adults.    Exquisitely  perfumed.  Relieves 
Skin  Irritation,  cures  Sunburn  and  renders  an  excellent 
complexion.    Price  25  Cents,  by  Mail. 

GOURAUD'S  POUDRE  SUBTILE 
Removes  Superfluous  Hair.  Price  $1.00,  by  Mail 

FERD.  T.  HOPKINS,  Pra».,  37  Gtmi  Jmm  St..  N«r  T«rk  Citr 


Any  Victrola 

On  Easy  Terms 

Whether  you  get  the  r\t\\  low  price 
Victrola  at  $15  or  the  Victrola  "de  luxe"  at 
$200,  get  a  Victrola.  At  a  very  small  ex- 
pense you  can  enjoy  a  world  of  entertain- 
ment. Victrolas  $15  to  $200.  Any  Victrola 
on  easy  terms. 

Sherman  Way  &  Go. 


Stein  w«y  and  Other  Piann  Apollo  and  Cecilian  Player  Pianos 
Victor  Talkinj  Machine,    '^heet  iVlusic  and  Musical  Merchandise 

Kearny  and  Sutter  Streets,  San  Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  StreeU.  Oakland 


16 


TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


him  the  information.  Both  of  Mrs.  Sartoris's 
daughters  are  married.  They  are  Mrs.  George 
H.  Woolston,  formerly  Miss  Rosemary  Sartoris, 
and  Mrs.  Frederick  Roosevelt  Scovel,  formerly 
Miss  Vivian  Sartoris. 


resentative  gathering  of  the  smart  folk  at  this 
cafe.  One  comes  to  Tait's  to  see  and  to  be  seen. 
The  management  is  featuring  a  special  luncheon 
every  day  and  it's  well  worth  the  half  dollar  asked 
for  it. 


A  Prophetess  Not  Without  Honor 

Our  Kathleen  continues  to  be  heard  from.  A 
cellist  brother  of  Miss  Parlow  tells  me  that  he 
heard  her  in  Boston,  as  soloist  of  the  Symphony, 
with  unqualified  delight;  that  of  women  violinists 
she  plays  second  fiddle  to  none,  not  even  Maud 
Powell;  that  her  interpretation  is  mastery  itself, 
her  bowing  virility,  her  whole  playing  virtuosity, 
plus  personality;  that  she  is  the  same  sweet  child 
she  was,  only  more  mature.  Fritz  Kreisler  may 
have  as  much  technique,  but  not  even  he  can  boast 
of  more.  The  great  fiddle  Alexandra  gave  her 
speaks  to  you  as  man  to  man,  and  asks  nothing  of 
gallantry.  His  praise  was  damned  by  no  faint- 
est breath  of  Great  for  a  woman!  Now,  though 
the  cello  and  the  violin  have  the  viola  between 
them  to  keep  peace  in  the  family,  and  though 
competition  is  ever  keenest  betwixt  the  most 
closely  allied  species,  I  have  heard  cello  and 
violin  quarrel  like  Kilkenny  cats  till  there 
was  nothing  left  for  the  horse-tail  to  wail  over. 
It  was  not  generosity  disinterested  spoke,  but 
intensely  interested  enthusiasm.  Henry  Holmes 
had  taught  both,  but  the  best  of  education  can- 
not draw  out  of  you  what  is  not  in  you.  Kath- 
leen had  it  in  her,  has  in  double  measure.  Such 
was  the  sum  and  substance  of  a  common  friend's 
encomium,  to  which  I  lend  ready  ear.  It  warns 
the  cockles  of  one's  heart  to  hear  artists  speak 
well  of  the  living.  A  recent  paper  in  The  Strand 
Magazine  on  great  women  musicians,  puts  Miss 
Parlow  second  only  to  Maud  Powell,  and  accom- 
panies the  praise  with  a  speaking  likeness — 
speaking  volumes  of  greatness. 


Our  Famous  Cafe 

When  the  question  of  "Where  shall  I  dine" 
arises,  one's  thoughts  naturally  turn  to  Tait's. 
Dining  at  this  famous  establishment  is  "quite  the 
thing"  nowadays.  At  no  other  cafe  in  town  is 
enjoyment  more  thorough  than  it  is  here.  On 
entering  this  establishment  you  immediately 
"sense"  the  charm  of  the  place,  and  you  are  filled 
with  the  Bohemian  spirit  that  pervades  the  atmo- 
sphere. Here  even  the  blase,  languid  idler  is 
roused  to  enthusiasm.    And  there's  always  a  rep- 


In  the  Social  Spotlight 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Adolph  Rosenthal  and  a  party 
of  friends  are  enjoying  the  beautiful  scenery  of 
the  Feather  River.  The  friends  of  the  talented 
specialist  are  expecting  great  quantities  of  fish,  as 
the  doctor  is  a  wonder  with  the  rod  and  reel. 

The  John  J.  Barretts  have  decided  to  spend  a 
week  in  the  Yosemite. 

General  L.  W.  Cooke,  U.  S.  A.,  and  Mrs.  Cooke 
are  at  the  Victoria.  General  E.  S.  McClernard 
and  Mrs.  McClernard  are  also  settled  at  the 
Victoria  for  an  indefinite  stay.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Homer  Wood  returned  during  the  week  from 
their  honeymoon,  and  arc  spending  a  few  days 
at  the  Victoria  before  leaving  for  their  home  at 
Salinas.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  H.  Decker  of  Denver 
and  Mrs.  E.  B.  Critchlow  of  Salt  Lake  are  guests 
at  the  Hotel  Victoria.  Mrs.  Josephine  Stokes 
Adams,  Miss  Lida  Stokes  Adams,  Miss  Emma 
Klater  and  Dr.  Eleanor  C.  Jones  of  Philadelphia 
are  registered  at  the  Victoria. 

There's  nothing  like  a  few  days  in  the  open 
air  for  rejuvenation  and  relief  from  the  "tired- 
of-the-city-noise-feeling."  That  is  why  Mr.  W. 
P.  Scott  and  Dr.  James  Eaves  are  spending  two 
weeks  enjoyably,  mostly  on  the  Del  Monte  golf 
course.  Mrs.  Leon  L.  Roos  has  joined  Mrs.  M. 
Meyerfeld  and  Mrs.  F.  Schloss  who  are  spend- 
ing the  summer  at  Del  Monte,  and  is  in  the 
midst  of  all  the  festivities.  Mrs.  E.  J.  Bowen 
and  maid  are  enjoying  the  July  climate  of  Del 
Monte.  Mrs.  Robert  Hays-Smith,  with  her  child 
and  nurse,  is  comfortably  quartered  at  Del  Monte 
for  the  summer.  Mrs.  Stafford  Parker  and  her 
brother  Mr.  H.  H.  Young  are  in  love  with  Del 
Monte  and  its  beautiful  environment,  and  their 
visit  will  extend  into  August.  Dr.  William  Watt 
Kerr  and  his  wife  are  enjoying  motoring  and 
other  outdoor  recreations  with  their  friends  at 
Del  Monte  while  waiting  for  a  new  set  of  golf 
sticks,  having  had  the  misfortune  to  lose  his 
from  the  machine  on  their  trip  down  from  the 
city.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  N.  Bishop,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
C.  W.  Waller,  Mr.  Cuyler  Lee,  Jr.,  Roy  B.  Demp- 
ster, and  Richard  Lec  are  enjoying  a  week  or 
two  at  Del  Monte. 


Since  the  decision  rendered  by  the  United  States  Supreme 
Court,  it  has  been  decided  by  the  Monks  hereafter  to  bottle 

CHARTREUSE 

(Liqueur  Peres  Chartreux) 

both  being  identically  the  same  article,  under  a  combination 
label  representing  the  old  and  the  new  labels,  and  in  the  old 
style  of  bottle  bearing  the  Monks'  familiar  insignia,  as  shown 
in  this  advertisement. 

According  to  the  decision  of  thr  U.  S.  Supreme  Court, 
handed  down  by  Mr.  Justice  Hughes  on  May  29,  1911,  no 
one  but  the  Carthusian  Monks  (Peres  Chartreux)  is  entitled 
to  use  the  word  CHARTREUSE  as  the  name  or  designation 
of  a  Liqueur,  so  their  victory  in  the  suit  against  the  Cusenier 
Company,  representing  M.  Henri  Lecouturier,  the  Liquidator 
appointed  by  the  French  Courts,  and  his  successors,  the 
Compagnie  Fermiere  de  la  Grande  Chartreuse,  is  complete. 

The  Carthusian  Monks  (Peres  Chartreux),  and  they  alone, 
have  the  formula  or  recipe  of  the  secret  process  employed 
in  the  manufacture  of  the  genuine  Chartreuse,  and  have  never 
parted  with  it.  There  is  no  genuine  Chartreuse  save  that 
made  by  them  at  Tarragona,  Spain. 

At  first-class  Wine  Merchants,  Grocers,  Hotels,  Caies. 
Batjer  &  Co.,  45  Broadway,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Sole  Agents  for  United  States. 


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July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


17 


Where  An  Artistic  Building  Scheme  is  in  Process  of  Development  by  Which 
Homes  are  to  be  in  Harmony  with  Environment 


The  effort  in  America  to  evoke  sympathy  with 
schemes  of  building  in  accord  with  landscape  op- 
portunities, and  with  intelligent  perception  of  the 
possibilities  of  grouping  has  failed  in  almost 
every  instance.  It  has  been  practically  impossi- 
ble to  make  the  individual  builder  feel  that  it  is 
worth  while  to  attempt  to  co-operate  with  his 
prospective  neighbor,  in  whom  he  almost  in- 
variably foresees  an  animal  destitute  of  the  first 
principles  of  good  taste  and  an  invader  animated 
with  the  desire  to  humiliate  the  original  intruder 
upon  tlic  horizon. 

The  result,  as  a  rule,  is  a  sort  of  competitive 
building  that  swells  eventually  into  a  discordant 
clamor  affrighting  the  timid  pilgrim  in  quest  of 
a  restful  refuge  and  makes  him  seek  a  sanctuary 
in  the  tall  timbers.  And  yet  the  immediate  and 
enthusiastic  response  to  a  suggestion  to  develop 
the  "city  beautiful"  shows  that  the  aspiration  of 
"the  people"  to  beauty  is  undying.  It  is  as 
strong  as  it  was  in  the  days  of  the  ancients,  but 
it  is  inarticulate.  It  lacks  the  power  of  expres- 
sion, and  perishes  in  a  futile  struggle  to  assert 
itself. 

The  reason  for  the  failure  of  American  com- 
munities, in  the  past— i.  e.  the  most  recent  and 
strenuous  past — to  grow  harmoniously  was  well 
indicated  by  Joe  Redding  in  an  address  before 
the  Down  Town  Association  of  San  Francisco. 
Mr.  Redding  was  discussing  public  improvements, 
notably  proposed  monuments  for  the  center  of 
the  business  district,  and  endeavored  to  impress 
upon  his  hearers  the  necessity  of  a  general  scheme 
of  development  instead  of  sporadic  and  unrelated 
efforts  to  achieve  the  esthetic  ideal  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. He  delved  to  the  roots  of  the  flower  of 
esthetic  growth  in  public  art  when  he  cited 
Pericles  of  Athens  and  the  lost  Napoleon  of 
France  as  illustrating  the  fact  that  no  great 
logical  plan  of  a  city  has  ever  been  accomplished 
except  where  one  man  has  dominated  the  tre- 
mendous work  of  giving  form  to  the  complex  as- 
semblage of  units  that  composes  a  metropolis. 
This  truth  has,  of  course,  been  illustrated  through 
all  history. 

With  these  facts  in  mind  the  development  of 
the  region  across  the  Bay  of  San  Francisco  not 
only  compels  our  profound  admiration,  but  ex- 
cites our  civic  pride;  for  while  the  transbay 
cities  have  as  yet  been  reluctant  to  unite  with  us 
literally  as  one  huge  world  center  they  are  the 
home-places  of  thousands  of  the  wealthy  men 
who  are  striving  to  give  the  San  Francisco  of  the 
immediate  future  its  "place  in  the  sun."  The 
planning  of  great  tracts  across  the  Bay  and  their 
realization    in    groups   of   what   are  practically 


beautiful  rural  estates  within  a  city  afford  not  only 
the  most  notable  achievement  of  its  kind  in 
America,  but  an  accomplishment  unsurpassed  in 
the  world.  This  is  a  fact  conceded  by  discrim- 
inating travellers  and  one  whose  significance  is 
obvious  to  any  visitor  who  rides  or  drives 
through  the  miles  of  gardened  and  forested  hill 
country  that  form  the  natural  amphitheatre  of 
Alameda  County.  Here  not  one  but  a  group  of 
men  owning  vast  estates  have  developed  in  per- 
fect harmony  with  each  other  the  most  extensive 
and  impressive  scheme  of  landscape  gardening  in 
the  United  States.  Through  their  inspiring  con- 
ceptions of  community  growth  they  have  stim- 
ulated some  of  the  best  individual  expressions 
of  architecture  and  landscape  treatment  that  have 
ever  originated.  Not  only  is  each  home  and  es- 
tate in  harmony  with  its  environment,  but  all 
tracts  of  various  owners  are  improved  in  ab- 
solute sympathy  with  the  general  ideal  of  realiz- 
ing the  full  opportunity  of  an  incomparable  in- 
spiration of  Nature. 

The  best  example  of  the  informing  impulse  that 
is  revealed  through  the  hill  region  back  of  Oak- 
land is  found  in  Rockridge  Terrace,  where  the 
scheme  of  Naples,  giving  to  each  villa  its  own 
place  in  the  landscape,  is  developed  upon  far 
more  beautiful  lines  than  the  original  which  in- 
spired it.  Among  the  great  decorative  features 
here  which  distinguish  Rockridge  are  the  seven 
parks  that  were  giv^n  to  the  City  of  Oakland 


by  the  Laymance  Real  Estate  Company.  In  or- 
der to  realize  the  landscape  treatment  one  must 
understand  that  in  this  beautiful  residential  sec- 
tion there  are  no  small  cities.  Each  home  is  in 
itself  a  park  and  a  viewpoint.  The  roads,  of 
course,  follow  the  natural  lines  of  the  slopes, 
leaving  as  in  Naples  a  commanding  marine  view 
and  a  landscape  opportunity  for  each  dweller. 
To  this  advantage  the  parks  and  sunken  gardens 
with  their  masses  of  foliage  and  color  lend  a 
splendid  approach.  Classic  stairways  lead  up  the 
slopes  of  the  park  and  from  decorative  landing 
to  landing  continue  over  the  ridge  of  the  hill  dis- 
appearing into  the  forest.  Italian  balustrades  fol- 
low the  winding  line  of  the  roads  on  each  crest, 
gleaming  in  white  through  the  floral  mass.  The 
entire  district  is  a  wonderful  illustration  of  the 
compelling  influence  of  a  big  landscape  plan  upon 
the  independent  esthetic  development  of  its 
units,  and  makes  Rockridge  the  fullest  and  most 
satisfying  expression  of  the  group  idea  in  Amer- 
ican cdumiunity  building. 

Just  as  the  amalgamation  of  large  business  in- 
terests on  both  sides  of  the  Bay  hints  at  the 
ultimate  union  of  the  group  of  cities  facing  the 
Golden  Gate,  so  the  recent  establishment  in 
Rockridge  of  a  group  of  San  Francisco's  million- 
aires in  stately  homes  and  estates  foreshadows 
the  closer  communion  of  the  sister  cities  as  they 
approach  their  common  destiny. 


A  SECTION  OF  ROCKKIDGE 


It 


Even  at  the  risk  of  seeming  obtrusively  dog- 
matic 1  must  assert  with  all  possible  emphasis 
that  the  playwrights  whose  brain-child  is  caper- 
ing listlessly  at  the  Alcazar  this  week  have  no 
reason  to  be  proud  of  their  offspring.  Yet  the 
thing  is  not  irredeemable.  Even  a  very  bad  play 
may  be  made  presentable.  Almost  any  clever 
playwright  can  do  the  trick.  And  even  so  me- 
diocre a  critic  as  myself  can  give  Joseph  Medill 
Patterson  and  Hugh  Ford  some  pointers  that 
might  enable  them  to  do  some  effective  patch- 
work. Perhaps  it  may  be  well  to  do  so  in  a  little 
essay  on  the  essentials  and  non-essentials  of 
dramaturgy.  By  way  of  introduction  I  will  say 
that  there  is  no  penal  statute  in  the  Republic  of 
Letters  which  prohibits  a  playwright  from  rapiug 
the  plot  of  a  story-writer.  There  is  therefore  no 
reason  for  the  apparent  diffidence  of  playwrights 
who  dramatize  stories.  In  the  old  days  the  play- 
wright seized  a  story  wherever  he  found  one  that 
looked  good  to  him.  He  made  no  bones  about 
it.  He  did  what  he  liked  with  it.  It  is  to  this 
picarooning  practice  of  the  playwright  that  we 
are  indebted  for  some  of  our  best  dramas;  for. 
indeed,  the  most  popular  play  ever  written, 
which  is  what  I  take  Hamlet  to  be.  Nowadays 
when  a  playwright  lifts  a  plot  he  tells  the  world 
about  it,  and  then  on  some  mysterious  ethical 
principle  he  tries  to  vindicate  his  fidelity  to  the 
original  story  by  putting  as  much  as  possible  of 
it  on  the  stage.    This  endeavor  is  fatal  to  good 


TOWN  TALK 

A  Conglomerate  Drama 

By  Theodore  Bonnet 

drama.  The  business  of  the  dramatist  is  to 
eliminate  exerything  that  isn't  absolutely  essential 
to  perfect  depiction.  Moreover  it  is  the  privilege 
of  the  dramatist  to  make  the  borrowed  story  his 
own,  to  make  it  conform  to  the  exigencies  of  the 
stage.  Now  this  is  precisely  what  Joseph  Medill 
Patterson  and  Hugh  Ford  did  not  do  with  the 
plots  they  took  from  O.  Henry's  "Cabbages  and 
Kings."  Behind  the  phenomena  of  the  Henry 
stories  is  an  inexorable  cynicism.  This  is  not 
easily  transferred  to  the  stage.  But  enough  of 
the  touches  of  it  remain  to  make  the  drama  ring 
unpleasantly  false.  The  playwrights  did  not  de- 
pend sufficiently  on  their  own  imagination.  They 
gave  their  mechanical  ability  the  upperhand  just 
as  the  epicure  gives  the  reins  to  his  palate.  It  re- 
quired a  deal  of  imagination  to  tell  those  Henry 
stories  successfully  in  the  new  form,  to  fuse  the 
discordant  elements  of  farce  and  comedy-drama 
and  compass  a  new-fangled  blend  of  sentiment 
and  silliness.  The  difficulty  is  in  the  very  at- 
mosphere of  the  piece.  The  atmosphere  of  the 
average  South  American  republic  is  the  atmo- 
sphere of  farce  comedy.  Henry  made  it  even 
more  farcical  than  it  is.  While  the  playwrights 
have  not  toned  down  the  farce  they  have 
brightened  the  sentiment.  One  might  as  well  try 
to  compound  a  play  out  of  Pickwick  and  Madame 
Marneffe.  Fancy  being  called  upon  to  accept  as 
a  tender,  romantic  heroine  a  lady  who  tried  to 
poison  her  husband!    Yet  an  Alcazar  audience 


July  6.  1912 


has  been  chided  for  not  knowing  when  to  weep 
and  when  to  laugh.  In  the  theatre  sense  plays 
havoc  with  nonsense.  No  wonder  that  "Cab- 
bages and  Kings"  gets  more  of  our  snickers  and 
sneers  than  of  our  sympathies.  But  to  come  back 
momentarily  to  my  essay.  In  writing  a  play  it's 
a  good  thing  to  employ  a  foot-rule  and  a  tape- 
line,  for  building  a  drama  is  much  like  building 
a  house.  There  must  be  a  nice  distribution  of 
parts  and  there  must  be  equilibrium.  The  ascent 
to  the  catastrophe  must  be  gradual,  and  also  the 
descent  to  the  final  curtain.  In  "Cabbages  and 
Kings"  the  descent  is  like  going  over  a  precipice. 
All  ends  are  brought  together  in  a  jiffy.  The 
last  act  is  of  the  rapid-fire  variety,  and  you  don't 
know  whether  to  accept  it  as  farce  or  genuine 
sentiment.  Indeed  it  is  in  this  respect  that  the 
play  puzzles  from  beginning  to  end,  ringing  true 
nowhere.  Nevertheless,  as  I  have  said,  it  is  not 
hopeless  despite  the  difficulty  of  steering  safely 
through  the  Scylla  and  Charybdis  that  stretch 
along  the  progress  of  the  story.  If  the  play- 
wrights would  not  attempt  to  transform  their 
tigress  into  a  nightingale,  and  if  they  would  soft- 
pedal  their  farce  and  be  just  a  little  less  forty- 
second-and-broadwayish  in  their  dialogue  they 
might  succeed  in  fashioning  a  pretty  fair  comedy- 
drama.  That  the  Alcazar  players  manage  to  hold 
an  audience  with  it  in  its  present  state  is  evi- 
dence of  the  ability  of  our  stock  organization. 


A  Mighty  Hunter  in  Motion  Pictures 

The  Paul  J.  Rainey  African  Hunt  Pictures  come 
to  the  Cort  for  a  two  weeks'  engagement  begin- 
ning tomorrow  (Sunday)  afternoon.  It  is  said 
tliat  they  are  the  most  marvelous  motion  pic- 
tures ever  taken.  They  have  been  exhibited  at 
the  Smithsonian  Institute  and  have  attracted  the 
attention  of  the  world's  greatest  scientists.  Mr. 
Rainey  is  a  millionaire  sportsman  of  Cleveland. 
Ohio,  and  has  the  reputation  of  being  the  most 
noted  and  fearless  hunter  of  wild  game  in  the 
world.  The  films  to  be  shown  at  the  Cort  were 
made  on  Mr.  Rainey's  last  expedition  to  Africa. 
They  show  the  hunter  and  his  associates  hunting 
lions,  tigers,  leopards  and  other  wild  animals  in 
the  jungles  of  Africa.  Many  hair-breadth  escapes 
from  death  are  depicted  on  the  screen.  Among 
other  views,  a  picture  of  a  herd  of  zebra  led  by  a 
member  of  the  gnu  family  is  shown.  When 
driven  out  of  his  own  tribe  this  beast  always 
seeks  out  a  herd  of  zebra,  appointing  himself 
its  leader.  Mr.  Rainey  is  shown  capturing  a 
wild  dog,  a  feat  that  stands  unparalleled  in  the 
annals  of  natural  history.  It  is  said  that  Hagen- 
back,  the  famous  animal  dealer  of  Hamburg,  af- 
ter having  spent  much  time  and  something  like 
$10,000  in  an  endeavor  to  secure  a  specimen 
alive,  gave  up  in  despair  and  declared  that  no  one 
would  be  able  to  take  one  of  these  animals.  An- 
other picture  shows  a  herd  of  several  hundred 
Thompson  gazelles.  They  are  declared  by  scient- 
ists to  be  the  most  timid  creatures  in  the  world. 
The  photographs  were  taken  but  seventy-five 
yards  distant  from  the  animals.  A  baby  rhin- 
oceros that  was  captured  is  also  seen.  This 
baby  rhino  is  now  in  the  London  Zoological 
Gardens.    It  is  proven  by  these  pictures  that  the 


Gossip  of  the  Hieatre 

li  ni,  which  has  always  been  regarded  as  the  King 
of  Beasts,  is  a  coward.  One  was  brought  to  bay 
1  y  a  pack  of  Mississippi  bearhounds. 


ALICK  LAUDER 
Harry    Lauder's    brother,    who    will    make    his  first 
American  appearance  at  the  Pantages  Theatre. 


At  the  Columbia 

"Louisiana  Lou,"  the  Columbia  Theater  musical 
comedy,  is  a  most  entertaining  combination  of 
bright  lines,  gay  music  and  pretty  women.  Its 


principal  fun-makers  are  Barney  Bernard  and 
Sophie  Tucker,  a  very  clever  pair  of  mimes. 
With  them  are  Bessie  De  Voie  and  Eleanor 
Henry,  pulchritudinous  damsels;  Harry  Hanlon 
and  Helena  Salinger  admirable  in  character  roles. 
The  chorus  is  of  triple  Class  A  construction. 


Vaudeville  at  the  Pantages 

Excellent  entertainment  is  provided  at  the 
Pantages  Theatre  this  week  and  the  vaudeville 
house  is  crowded  these  afternoons  and  evenings 
with  audiences  that  are  most  enthusiastic  in 
praise  of  "The  Five  Columbians,"  as  the  Caro 
Miller  family  is  called,  in  their  spectacular  sing- 
ing and  dancing  act;  Tallman,  the  wizard  of  the 
cue,  in  his  pool  performances;  the  Gordon  High- 
landers, in  their  novel  musical  act;  Lew  Pistel 
and  O.  H.  Gushing,  "the  stranded  minstrels,"  and 
the  many  other  good  features  of  the  bill.  For 
the  week  commencing  Sunday  afternoon  no  less 
a  personage  than  Alick  Lauder,  brother  of  Harry 
Lauder,  has  been  engaged  to  head  the  program. 
Lauder  comes  direct  from  Australia,  where  he 
has  been  making  a  great  hit  and  this,  his  first 
American  appearance,  is  looked  forward  to  with 
great  interest.  In  England  he  is  a  tremendous 
favorite  and  his  original  songs  and  characteriza- 
tions are  said  to  be  wonderful  studies.  Sig.  G. 
Frizzo,  the  famous  quick  change  artist  of  Rome, 
will  also  be  new  here,  presenting  his  transforma- 
tion sketch,  "Eldorado,"  in  which  he  imperson- 
ates nine  entirely  different  characters  and  gives  a 
complete  theatrical  entertainment.  Lordy's  dog 
actors  and  acrobats,  direct  from  London  via  Aus- 
tralia, will  appear  here  for  the  first  time,  offering 
their  novel  skit,  "The  Burglar's  Fate."  The  Mar- 
meen  Four,  clever  singers  and  instrumentalists. 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


19 


including  a  couple  of  pretty  girls,  will  offer  a 
melange  of  musical  oddities  and  the  Lessos,  whose 
juggling  feats  have  won  them  fame  all  over  the 
world,  will  present  their  entirely  original  act. 
Those  musically  inclined  will  experience  a  treat 
in  the  violin  playing  of  Henri  Kubelik,  nephew  of 
the  famous  Jan  Kubelik,  who  is  now  making  his 
first  American  vaudeville  tour. 


Bennett's  Farewell  Week 

Richard  Bennett's  farewell  week  at  the  Alcazar 
commences  next  Monday  evening  with  a  revival 
of  Charlts  Klein's  great  play  of  love  and  finance, 


a  curtain  raiser  for  "Naughty  Anthony."  In  a 
fashion  typical  of  Martin  Beck  the  production  as 
designed  by  Belasco  will  be  of  the  finest.  Mr. 
Belasco  has  given  this  presentation  the  first  he 
has  ever  made  for  vaudeville  the  best  of  his  mas- 
tery of  stage  craft.  Clara  Blandick,  a  clever  and 
popular  young  actress,  has  been  selected  for  the 
part  of  Cho-Cho-San  and  Earl  Ryder  will  enact 
the  role  of  Sharpless  the  American  Consul.  It 
would  be  difficult  to  classify  Brown  and  Blyer 
who  come  ne.xt  week,  except  in  their  own  terms 
"Just  Entertainers."  In  their  act  there  is  some 
patter,  a  little  song,  a  bit  of  music  and  a  dance 


I'.AUL  J.  R.\INEY'S  AFRICAN  HUNT 

Scene   from  the   wonderful   sportsman's   African  expedition,  to  be  shown  in  motion  pictures 
at  the  Cort  Theatre  Sunday. 


"The  Lion  and  the  Mouse,"  in  which  the  clever 
actor  scored  one  of  his  earlier  successes.  Indeed, 
his  impersonation  of  Jefferson  Ryder,  the  auto- 
crat-millionaire's rebellious  son,  was  the  means  of 
elevating  him  to  stardom,  for  he  originated  the 
part  and  made  so  much  of  it  that  the  New  York 
critics  gave  him  first  honors  in  a  roster  embrac- 
ing several  prominent  histrions.  In  the  cast  with 
him  will  be  Mabel  Morrison  as  Shirly  Rossmore 
(her  au  revoir  role),  in  which  she  made  a  pro- 
nounced hit  last  season  at  the  Alcazar,  and  the 
full  strength  of  the  stock  company  appropriately 
bestowed. 


Belasco  at  the  Orpheum 

David  Bclasco's  magnificent  production  of  his 
own  play  "Madame  Butterfly"  will  be  the  Or- 
pheum headline  attraction  next  week.  The  im- 
pression that  it  is  a  condensed  version  has  become 
current  and  is  erroneous.  "Madame  Butterfly" 
has  always  been  a  one-act  play  and  Mr.  Belasco's 
present  presentation  is  exactly  the  same  as  when 
the  piece  was  used  originally  in  New  York  as 


step  or  two.  A  trio  of  pretty,  vivacious  and 
symmetrical  girls  bearing  the  name  of  the 
O'Meers  Sisters  and  Company  will  furnish  a  most 
attractive  novelty  in  wire  performances.  Their 
stunts  are  new  and  thrilling.  They  open  with 
a  pretty  little  song,  then  flit  about  on  the  wire 
and  conclude  with  a  Russian  folk  song,  for  which 
they  wear  a  picturesque  and  correct  costume. 
Honors  and  Le  Prince,  a  team  of  French  acro- 
bats and  recent  arrivals  from  Paris  will  make 
their  first  appearance  in  this  city.  Like  most 
Frenchmen  they  are  superior  pantomimists  and 
they  enliven  their  acrobatic  feats  with  genuine 
comedy.  Ray  L.  Royce,  a  splendid  actor  with  a 
gift  of  mimicry,  will  introduce  his  artistic 
sketches  of  eccentric  characters.  Next  week  will 
conclude  the  engagements  of  Graham  Moffat's 
Company  of  Scottish  players  in  Mr.  Moffat's  own 
sketch  "The  Concealed  Bed";  The  Five  Piriscoffis 
and  also  of  George  "Honey  Boy"  Evans,  the  peer- 
less monologist  who  is  convulsing  the  audiences 
with  laughter  at  every  performance  and  making 
the  biggest  kind  of  a  hit. 


AMUSEMENTS 

Jit. 

COLUMBIA  THEATRE 

The  Leading  Playhouse.    Geary  and  Mason  Sti. 
f hones,  Franklin  ISO  and  Home  C  5783 

Nightly  Including  Sunday 
Matinees  Wednesdays  and  Saturdays 
FOR  TWO  MORE  WEEKS 
The  Great  La  Salle  Theater,  Chicago  Success 

"LOUISIANA  LOU" 

The  Musical  Comedy  with  Real  Fun  and  Jingly  Music 
BARNEY   GERNARD,  SOPHIE  TUCKER  and  others. 
Bargain    Matinee,   Wednesday,   25c,   50c,   75c   and  $1.00. 
Evenings  and  Saturday  Matinee,  25c  to  $1.50. 
Coming— JAMES  K.  HACKETT  in  "The  Grain  of  Dust." 


Pantage's  Theatre 

Market  Street.  Opposite  Mason 

Week  of  Sunday.  July  7th 
INTERNATIONAL  ATTRACTIONS! 
Alick  Lauder,  lirother  of  Harry  Lauder,  in  Character 
Songs  and  Studies :  Frizzo,  World's  Greatest  Quick  Change 
.\rtist ;  Marmeen  Four,  in  a  Melange  of  Musical  Oddities ; 
Lord's  Dog  Actors  and  Acrobats;  Henri  Kubelik,  Distiiig- 
guished  Hungarian  Violinist;  The  Lessos,  Famous  Jugglers: 
Jones  and  Mayo,  Comedy  Conversationalists  and  Sunlight 
Pictures. 

Matinee  Daily  at  2:30.  Nights,  7:15  and  9:15.  Sunday 
and  Holidays  Matinees  at  1  :30  and  3:30.  Nights  Con- 
tinuous from  6  :30. 

Prices — 10c,  20c  and  30c. 


Safest  and  .M' 
Magnificei'i 
Theatre  t 
America 


Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afternoon.  Matinee  Every  Da> 
MARVELOUS  VAUDEVILLE 

DAVID  BELASCO  Pn. 


cnts 


MADAME  BUTTERFLY, 


a  one  act  play  by  David  Belasco,  Based  on  John  Luther 
Long's  Japanese  Story;  BROWN  and  BLYER,  "Just  En- 
tertainers"; O'MEERS  SISTERS  &  CO.,  3  Girls  on  the 
Wire;  HONORS  &  LE  PRINCE,  French  Pantomimic 
Gymnasts;  R.\Y  L.  ROYCE,  in  Eccentric  Character 
Sketches;  GRAHAM  MOFFAT'S  SCOTTISH  PLAYERS: 
FIVE  PIROSCOFFIS;  NEW  DAYLIGHT  MOTION 
PICTt  RES:  Last  Week— Great  Laughing  Hit,  GEORGE 
EVANS.  "The  Honey  Boy." 

Evening   Prices,   10c,   25c,   50c,   75c.     Box   Seats,  $1.00. 
Matinee  Prices  (except  Sundays  and  Holidays),  10c,  25c,  50c. 
Phones,  Douglas  70  and  Home  C  1570. 


Leading  Theatre 

Ellii  and  Market 

Phone  Sutter  2460 


This  Afternoon  and  Tonight,  Last  Times  of  the 
Durbar   in  Kinemacolor 
Beginning  Tomorrow    (Sunday)  Matinee 
Matinee  Daily  at  2;30.    Nights  at  8:30. 

PAUL  J.  RAINEY'S 
AFRICAN  HUNT 

The  Most  Marvelous  Motion  Pictures  Ever  Taken 
Prices — 25c  and  50c 


ALCAZAR  THEATRE 

O'Farrell,  near  Powell.    Phones,  Kearny  2  and  Home  C  4455 
Monday  Evening,  July  8th,  and  Throughout  the  Week 
Farewell   Appearances  of 

RICHARD  BENNETT 

And  Mabel   Morrison,  in 
Charles  Klein's  Great  Play 
THE  LION  AND  THE  MOUSE 

Prices:  Night,  25c  to  $1.00;  Matinee,  25c  to  50c. 
Matinee:   Thursday,   Saturday   and  Sunday. 
To  Follow:  BESSIE  BARRISCALE  in  "The  Rose  of  the 
Rancho." 


DIVIDEND  NOTICE 

SECURITY  SAVINGS  BANK,  316  Montgomery  St.  For 
the  half  year  ending  June  30,  1912,  a  dividend  upon  all  de- 
posits at  the  rate  of  four  (4)  per  cent  per  annum,  free  of 
taxes,  will  be  payable  on  and  after  July  1,  1912.  FRED 
W.  RAY,  Secretary.  1 


TOWN  TALK 


July  6,  1912 


SANTA  CRUZ  WATER  CARNIVAL 

A  fairy  lake,  viewed  from  the  decks  of  a  huge 
phantom  ship,  erected  on  a  grass-grown  island  in 
San  Lorenzo  River, — this  is  to  be  the  scene  of 
the  great  water  pageant  and  carnival  at  Santa 
Cruz,  starting  on  July  20th  and  lasting  an  entire 
week.  Hundreds  of  workmen,  under  the  direct 
personal  management  of  Mr.  Fred  Swanton,  are 
gradually  transforming  the  sandy  flats  just  south 
of  Hotel  Casa  del  Rey  into  a  veritable  fairyland, 
soon  to  be  peopled  with  strange  and  wonderful 
gnomes,  genii  and  pixies  and  guarded  by  a  fleet 
of  mystic  water  craft,  each  vessel  of  which  will  re- 
mind you  of  Shakespeare's  "A  Midsummer  Nights 
Dream."  It  is  a  bold  idea  of  Manager  Swan- 
ton's  and  one  that  will  not  soon  be  forgotten  by 


Los  Angeles 


$25  Round  Trip 


San  Diego  $29  Round  Trip 

Tickets  on  sale  daily 

Good  for  return  until  October  31,  1912 

Santa  Fe's  new  train 


Leaves  San  Francisco 
daily  at  4:00  p.  m. 
This  is  California's 
finest  train 


Angel 

On  the  return  trip  the  Saint  offers 
the  same  superior  service. 

Phone  or  call  on  me  for  reservations. 

Jas.  B.  Duffy,  Gen.  Agt.,  673  Market  St.,  San  Fran- 
cisco.   Phone:  Kearny  315  and  J  3371. 

J.  J.   Warner,   Gen.   Agt.,   1218   Broadway,  Oakland. 
Phone:   Oakland  425   and  A  4425. 

Santa  Fe 


OCEAN  SHORE  RAILROAD 

"Reaches  the  Beaches" 

NEW  SERVICE 

8  TRAINS  DAILY    12  TRAINS  SUNDAY 


TRAINS  LEAVE: 


8  A.M.  3  P.M.  EXTRA  SUNDAY  TRAINS 
10  A.M.   5:45  P.M.    6:55  A.H.      1:30  P.M. 


DEPOT 
Twelfth  and  Mission  Streets 

San  Francisco 


NORTH  GERMAN  LLOYD 

NEW  YORK,  GIBRALTAR,  ALGIERS, 
AH  Steamers  Equipped  with  Wireless  Telegraphy,  Latest 
Safety  Appliances  and  Submarine  Signals 

NEW  YORK,  LONDON,  PARIS,  BREMEN 

Fast  Express  Steamers.    Sailing  Tuesdays 
Twin-Screw  Passenger  Steamers.    Sailing  Thursdays 
S.  S.  "GEORGE  WASHINGTON" 
Largest  and  Newest  German  Steamer  Afloat 

NAPLES,  GENOA 
Fast  Express  Steamers.    Sailing  Saturdays 
INDEPENDENT   TOURS   AROUND   THE  WORLD 
Good  for  Two  Years.    Price  $618.00 
Travelers'  Checks  Good  All  Over  the  World 

ROBERT  CAPELLE,  250  Powell  St. 

Gco'l  Pacific  tout  Agent         NearSl.  Francis  Hotel  and  Geary  Si. 

Telephones:  Kearny  4794  and  Home  C  3725 


those  who  are  fortunate  enough  to  witness  the 
festival.  It  contemplates  the  damming  of  the 
San  Lorenzo  River,  a  stones-throw  from  where 
it  joins  the  mighty  Pacific,  in  order  to  create  a 
charming  lake;  the  decoration  of  the  southern 
banks  of  that  river  until  it  shall  resemble  Arcady; 
the  construction  on  an  island  of  a  huge  amphi- 
theatre in  the  shape  of  a  Spanish  Galleon,  capable 
of  seating  four  thousand  persons;  and  then  a 
nightly  parade  of  gorgeous  floats  and  boats,  filled 
with  singing  and  dancing  girls,  robust  steersmen 
and  soldiers  and  happy  children.  Rome,  in  its 
days  of  splendor,  never  conceived  anything  moie 
entrancing.  And  then,  to  be  sure,  there  will  he 
the  hundred  daylight  diversions  for  the  visitor, — 
the  yacht,  motor-boat,  shell,  swimming  and 
hydroplane  races;  the  airships  encircling  the  lofty 
blue;  the  bathing,  fishing,  dancing,  riding  and 
skylarking  on  the  mile-long  board  walk.  More 
than  fifty  great  white  birds,  belonging  to  the 
Corinthians  and  other  yachtsmen,  will  be  in  the 
harbor;  an  equal  number  of  motor-boats;  a  pair 
of  Uncle  Sam's  cruisers  and  two  of  his  submar- 
ines; an  even  dozen  of  the  world's  famous  swim- 
mers, under  the  direction  of  Sidney  Cavill;  and 
to  crown  it  all,  thousands  of  dollars'  worth  of  fire- 
works, which  will  illuminate  the  sky  at  the  close 
of  each  evening's  entertainment.  In  the  prepara- 
tion of  his  program.  Manager  Swanton  has  been 
aided  materially  by  Commodore  Conney,  of  the 
Corinthians,  and  ex-Commodore  Hogg,  each  of 
whom  has  taken  a  keen  interest  in  the  carnival. 
The  railroad  company  is  offering  exceptionally 
low  fares  for  the  week  and  the  hotels  and  cottage 
cities  of  Santa  Cruz  have  pledged  themselves  to 
make  no  advance  over  their  regular  rates.  ."Mto- 
gether,  "water  week"  at  Santa  Cruz  should  be  the 
biggest  thing  ever  attempted  on  the  Pacific  Coast 
and  Manager  Swanton  is  to  be  congratulated  upon 
designing  such  a  meritorious  entertainment. 


In  the  Limelight 

"Pinafore"  has  been  selected  as  the  opening 
bill  for  the  great  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  comic 
opera  festival  which  is  scheduled  to  begin  at  the 
Cort  on  Sunday  night,  July  21.  "Patience,"  "The 
Mikado"  and  "The  Pirates  of  Penzance"  are  the 
other  operas  that  will  be  given  during  the  four 
weeks'  engagement.  The  Messrs.  Shuhert  and 
William  A.  Brady,  producers,  will  send  the  orig- 
inal New  York  cast  from  the  Casino  direct  to 
the  Cort  Theatre  for  the  season.  Following  is 
the  correct  cast  that  will  interpret  the  operatic 
masterpieces;  De  Wolf  Hopper,  Blanche  Duffield, 
Eugene  Cowles,  George  J.  MacFarlane.  Kate  Con- 
don, Arthur  Aldridge,  Viola  Gillette,  Arthur 
Cunningham,  Alice  Brady  and  Louis  Barthcl. 

Following  "Louisiana  Lou"  at  the  Columbia 
Theater  will  appear  the  noted  actor,  James  K. 
Hackett,  who  since  his  famous  success  in  "The 
Prisoner  of  Zenda"  has  not  triumphed  to  such 
extent  as  he  has  in  his  new  play,  "The  Grain  of 
Dust."  Mr.  Hackett's  engagement  will  cover  a 
number  of  weeks  and  during  his  stay  here  will 
produce  a  new  Booth  Tarkington  play  called 
"The  Man  on  Horseback." 


Legal  Advice 

"It's  this  way,"  explained  the  client.  "The 
fence  runs  between  Brown's  place  and  mine.  He 
claims  that  I  encroach  on  his  land,  and  I  insist 
that  he  is  trespassing  on  mine.  Now,  what  would 
you  do,  if  you  were  in  my  place?" 

"If  I  were  in  your  place,"  replied  the  lawyer, 
"I'd  go  over  and  give  Brown  a  cigar,  take  a  drink 
with  him,  and  settle  the  controversy  in  ten  min- 
utes. But,  as  things  stand,  I  advise  you  to  sue 
him  by  all  means.  Let  no  arrogant,  domineering, 
insolent  pirate  like  Brown  trample  on  your  sacred 
rights.  Assert  your  manhood  and  courage.  I 
need  the  money." 


Western  Pacific 
Railway 

THE  FEATHER  RIVER  ROUTE 


Daily  Limited  Trains  to  Salt  Lake  City,  Den- 
ver, Omaha,  Kansas  City,  Saint  Louis,  Chicago 
and  all  points  East,  passing  through  the  beauti- 
ful canyon  of  the  Feather  River. 
Latest  types  of  Steel  Coaches,  Dining,  Obser- 
vation, Standard  and  Tourist  Sleeping-Cars. 

EQUIPMENT  ABSOLUTELY  NEW 
ELECTRIC  LIGHTED  THROUGHOUT 

SERVICE  UNEXCELLED 
INCOMPARABLE  SCENIC  SPLENDOR 

For  Full  Information  Address 
Any  Western  Pacific  Agent  or 

TICKET  OFFICES: 
665  Market  Street,  Palace  Hotel 

Phone  Sutter  1651 

Market  Street  Ferry  Depot 

Phone    Kearny  4980 

1326  Broadway,  Oakland 


Phone  Oakland  \12 


TENTS  AND  HAMMOCKS 

Camp  Furniture       Canoes  and  Flags 

Buy  Direct  from  the  Makers 

WEEKS- HOWE- EMERSON  COMPANY 

51  Market  Street      San  Francisco 


Against  the  loss  of  your  Will.  Deeds  and 
other  valuable  papers  by  placing  them  in  a 
safe  deposit  box,  where  fire  and  burglars  are 
unknown.    4  per  year. 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults  piil^nd  MVrL";°s"u. 

John  F.  Cunningham,  Manager 


Town  Talk  Press 

COMMERCIAL  PAMPHLET 
PUBLICATION  CATALOGUE 

PRINTERS 

BRIEFS  AND  TRANSCRIPTS 


TELEPHONE  DOUGLAS  2612 
88  First  St.,  Cor.  Missioo    :    San  FraBciico 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


21 


The  Financial  Outlook 


By  R.  E.  Mulcahy 


Stocks — The  banking  community  and  the  hold- 
ers of  the  bulk  of  securities  have  refused  through- 
out the  week  to  allow  political  contests  to  shake 
their  confidence  in  ultimate  prosperity  as  fore- 
shadowed by  improving  crop  conditions.  Fur- 
ther progress  has  therefore  been  made  in  the  di- 
rection of  higher  prices  for  securities  and  the 
outlook  for  still  higher  levels  has  brightened. 
The  distraction  of  attention  from  the  market  by 
politics  has  reduced  the  daily  total  of  transac- 
tions in  both  stocks  and  bonds,  but  it  has  not 
caused  unloading  or  pressure.  On  the  contrary, 
the  trend  of  the  speculative  securities  market  has 
been  upward.  Upheavals  from  radical  acts  and 
policies  of  a  new  President  are  no  longer  con- 
sidered within  the  bounds  of  possibility  by  the 
banking  and  industrial  communities,  who  share 
the  conviction  that  politics  and  business  will 
hereafter  move  along  separate  lines,  and  that  fur- 
ther improvement  in  the  securities  market  may 
therefore  be  looked  for  as  soon  as  the  conven- 
tion is  ended.  Back  of  this  seeming  indifference 
on  the  part  of  the  banking  and  business  world 
as  to  the  outcome  of  the  convention  is  to  be 
found,  however,  the  knowledge  that  the  iron, 
steel  and  copper  metal  trades  are  doing  their  ut- 
most to  counteract  even  the  restraining  influences 
hitherto  exercised  by  political  disturbances. 
Favorable  weather  in  all  portions  of  the  cereal 
and  cotton  growing  belts  has  necessitated  re- 
peated raising  of  the  estimates  on  the  yields  of 
wheat,  corn,  oats,  cotton  and  hay,  and  there  is 
every  reason  for  adding  to,  rather  than  lowering, 
the  recent  estimate  on  the  value  of  farm  product 
for  this  year  of  about  $9,000,000,000.  With  the 
growing  confidence  of  satisfactory  yield  of  ag- 
ricultural products,  there  has  also  come  the  de- 
sire to  provide  for  the  harvesting  of  the  crops 
with  agricultural  implements  and  machinery  and 
to  prepare  for  expansion  in  many  other  industries 
with  more  liberal  purchases  of  supplies.  Evi- 
dence of  the  improvement  has  been  furnished  by 
one  of  the  commercial  agencies  which  has  de- 
scribed it  as  uniformly  satisfactory  in  all  the 
leading  trade  centers  in  various  portions  of  the 
country,  and  by  the  unceasingly  large  volume  of 
bank  clearings  and  railroad  earnings.  Even  be- 
fore all  the  looked  for  improvement  materializes 
in  the  business  world,  however,  the  securities 
market  will  likely  anticipate  it  with  rising  prices. 

Cotton — The  cotton  market  the  past  week  has 
been  a  very  quiet  aiTair  with  fluctuations  in  a  very 
narrow  range,  but  failed  to  decline  in  keeping 
with  tlie  weakness  at  Liverpool  and  the  reports 
of  more  favorable  weather  in  all  sections.  Ex- 
cept for  a  few  light  scattered  showers  at  several 
points  in  the  central  and  south  Atlantic  States 
which  were  not  needed,  the  weather  could  be  con- 
sidered ideal  for  the  rapid  growth  and  develop- 


ment of  the  CLOp.  There  were  quite  a  few  notices 
sent  out  on  July  contract  but  these  were  promptly 
stopped  by  one  of  the  large  spot  houses  and  had 
little  or  no  effect  on  the  market.  There  are  some 
reports  creeping  in  daily  of  insects  appearing  over 
important  areas  in  the  Memphis  district  where 
the  outlook  is  said  to  be  less  encouraging  than  it 
was  ten  days  ago,  and  a  prominent  local  operator 
and  mill  man  returning  to  his  home  gave  a  some- 
what gloomy  account  of  the  crop  all  along  the 
route  from  Virginia  to  Alabama.  Very  few  are 
willing  to  risk  going  short,  as  nine  times  out  of 
ten  the  most  serious  injury  to  the  crop  occurs  af- 
ter July  1st.  It  is  obvious  that  a  wide  area  of 
dccirledly  high  temperatures  would  send  the 
market  up  and  July  is  the  month  of  high  tem- 
peratures. Furthermore  the  strength  in  the  spot 
situation  is  a  factor  not  to  be  ignored. 

Wheat — The  wheat  trade  the  l;ist  week  has  been 
conihicted  along  conservative  lines,  and  part  of 
the  time  the  trade  has  labored  under  a  feeling  of 
discouragement  and  depression.  The  price  being 
higher  than  a  year  ago  has  caused  some  nervous- 
ness iin  the  part  of  holders,  and  has  fostered  a 
i)elief  that  present  values  could  not  be  main- 
tained. This  has  caused  a  pretty  general  liquida- 
tion of  long  wheat  and  considerable  short  selling 
as  well.  The  milling  and  jobbing  trade  have  con- 
tinued their  persistent  attitude  of  withholding 
their  l)uying  orders  until  the  new  crop  movement 
is  under  way.  But  there  arc  now  indications 
that  these  procrastinating  tactics  will  soon  end, 
because  the  very  necessities  of  the  consumptive 
demand  will  compel  it.  It  is  a  threadbare  saying 
that  there  is  always  enough  wheat  to  go  around, 
but  tlie  trade  all  civcr  tlie  world  has  seemed  to 
have  fallen  in  with  that  idea,  and  to  have  been 
conducting  its  business  in  the  most  unconcerned 
way,  regardless  of  crop  losses,  or  exhaustion  of 
supplies,  or  anything  else.  France  is  the  country 
to  be  ruthlessly  awakened  to  the  fallacy  of  the 
belief  that  there  is  always  plenty  of  everything, 
eipecially  of  wheat,  and  for  many  months,  and 
until  recently,  that  country  paid  but  a  careless 
regard  to  the  serious  loss  of  its  own  crops,  or  to 
the  greater  loss  of  that  of  Russia.  The  French 
trade  has  continued  to  sell -wheat  for  future  de- 
livery at  a  large  discount  under  the  market  for 
cash  supplies,  only  to  buy  it  back  at  an  immense 
loss  when  the  month  rolled  around  in  which  the 
contract  matured.  What  is  true  of  France  is  also 
true  of  Germany  and  other  foreign  countries. 
The  present  values  of  wheat  all  over  continental 
Europe  emphasize  the  belief  that  there  is  ample 
foundation  for  serious  apprehension  rc.garding  the 
future  supply  of  food. 

Corn — The  corn  market  has  had  a  decline  of 
II  ci  nts  a  bushel  and  recovered  5  cents  of  it, 
and  while  the  price  is  still  high  the  conditions  are 


The  German  Savings  and  Loan  Society 

(THE  GERMAN  BANK) 
Savings  Incorporated   1858  Commercial 

526  CALIFORNIA  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Member   of   tlie   Associated   Savings  Banks 
of  San  Francisco 

The  following  Branclies  for  Receipt  and  Payment  of 
Deposits  only: 

MISSION    BRANCH,   2572   MISSION  STREET 
Between  2Ist  and  22nd 
RICHMOND    DISTRICT    BRANCH,    601  CLEMENT 
Corner  of  7th  Avenue 
HAIGHT    ST.    BRANCH,    1456    HAIGHT  ST. 
Near  Masonic  Ave. 

JUNE  29th,  1912: 

Assets   $51,140,101.75 

Capital  actually  paid  up  in  Cash   1,000,000.00 

Reserve  and  Contingent  Funds   1,656,403.80 

Employees'  Pension  Fund   140,109.60 

Number  of  Depositors    56,609 

Office  Hours:  10  o'clock  a.  m.  to  3  o'clock  p.  m.,  ex- 
cept Saturdays  to  12  o'clock  m.  and  Saturday  evenings 
from  6:30  p.  m.  to  8  o'clock  p.  m.  for  receipt  of  deposits 
only. 


Wells  Fargo  Nevada  National  Bank 

OF   SAN  FRANCISCO 
No.  2  MONTGOMhKY  S  1  REET 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits  $11,055,471.1  1 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   10.519.217.23 

Deposits    25,775,597.47 

Officers — Isaias  W.  Hellnian,  I'res.  ;  I.  \V.  liellman  Jr., 
V.-I'res. ;  F.  L.  Lipman,  V.-Pres. ;  James  K.  Wilson, 
V.-Pres. ;  Frank  B.  King,  Cashier;  W.  McGavin,  Asst. 
Cashier;  E.  L.  Jacobs,  Asst.  Cashier;  C.  L.  Davis,  Asst. 
Cashier;  A.  D.  Oliver,  Asst.  Cashier;  A.  B.  Price,  Asst. 
Cashier. 

Directors — Isaias   W.    Hellman,    I.    W.    Hellman  Jr., 
Joseph   Sloss,   A.    Christeson,    I*ercy   T.    Morgan,  Wm. 
Haas,    F.    W.    Van    Sicklen,    Hartland    Law,    Wm.  F. 
llerrin,   Henry   Rosenfeld,   John   C.   Kirkpatrick,  James 
Flood,   J.   Henry   Meyer,   Chas.   J.   Deering,   .\.  H. 
P.iyson,   James    K.    Wilson    and    F.    L.  Lipman. 
Customers  of  this  Bank  are  offered  every  facility  consis- 
tent with  prudent  banking.    New  accounts  are  invited. 
Safe  Deposit  Vaults 


Merchants  National  Bank 
of  San  Francisco 

Corner  New  Montgomery  and  Market  Streets 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  .$1,768,076.98 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   1,639,482.36 

Deposits    6,368,228.50 

OFFICERS 

Alfred  L.  Meyerstein  President 

J.    H.    Spring  Vice-President 

C.    A.    Hawkins  Vice-President 

R.  B.  Murdoch   .Assistant  to  President 

W.    W.   Jones  Cashier 

Geo.  Long   Assistant  Cashier 

C.   C.   Campbell  .'\ssistant  Cashier 

F.    W.    Judson  Assistant  Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Geo.   C.    lioardman  W.  J.  Hotchkiss 

Tames  C.   Eschen  C.  A.  Hawkins 

John  M.  Keith  Gavin  McNab 

Alfred  L.  Meyerstein  Robert  Oxnard 
Frederick  F.  Sayre  John  H.  Spring 
Harry  N.  Stetson  G,  H.  Umbscn 

A.  A.  Watkins 
The  officers  of  this  Bank  will  be  pleased  to  meet  or 

correspond    with    those    who    contemplate  making 

changes  or  opening  new  accounts. 

Safe  Deposit  Vaults  open  from  7:30  a.  m.  to  12 

p.  m.,  Sunilavs  and  Holidays  included. 


Telephone   DOI'GLAS  2487 


R.   E.  MULCAHY,  Manager 


Members 
New  York  Stock  Exchange 
New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
New  York  Coffee  Exchange 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade 


E.  F.  HUTTON  & 

THE  PIONEER  HOUSE 

BROKERS 

490  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
Branch.  ST.  FRANCIS  HOTEL 


CO. 


Two  Private  Wires  to 
Chicago   and   New  York 


Washington,  D.  C,  1301  F  Street 
Los  Angeles,  112  W.  Third  Street 
New  York,  31-33-35   New  Street 


22 

snch  that  present  vahics  seem  likeljr  to  be  main- 
tained, if,  indeed  they  do  not  work  considerably 
higher.  There  has  been  a  liberal  ran  of  receipts 
and  these  are  now  tapering  down  and  will  doubt- 
less continue  light  or  only  moderate  on  til  the  new 
crop  is  assnred.  We  believe  the  demand  will  be 
more  than  sufficient  to  absorb  all  the  offerings  at 
the  present  price  making  a  situation  that  is  in- 
viting to  the  investor  on  all  reactions. 


FINANCIAL  NOTES 

Sam  Parker  on  his  way  to  Honolulu  from 
Washington,  D.  C,  talked  while  in  town  of  the 
enterprise  of  the  Kon  and  Hilo  Ditch  Co.  which 
has  an  application  before  Congress  for  a  water 
franchise  which  will  involve  the  expenditure  of 
between  three  and  fonr  million  dollars  and  un- 
der which  78,000  acres  of  rich  land  will  be  ir- 
rigated. The  Kou  and  Hilo  Ditch  Co.  is  a  hold- 
ing company  owned  by  Mr.  Parker  and  an  as- 
sociate. It  has  completed  a  ditch  with  laterals 
for  the  Hamakna  Irrigation  Co.,  which  irrigates 
20XIC((  acres  and  it  has  another  system  in  opera- 
tion over  10,000  acres  for  the  Koholo  Irrigation 
Co.  These  companies  receive  from  $2,500  to 
S6,Wj  per  million  gallons  a  year. 

Charles  F.  Wood,  vice-president  of  The  Break- 
water Co.  of  Xew  York,  is  en  route  to  Honolulu. 
His  company  has  the  contract  for  the  government 
breakwater  to  cost  $2,000,000.  It  will  take  live 
years  to  complete  the  work  and  give  steady  em- 
ployment to  250  men. 

The  sugar  market  is  depressed  owing  to  the 
tariff  question  and  the  position  Cuba  occupies  as 
a  producer  of  sugar.  English  and  French  capital 
are  very  active  in  the  islands.  The  English  house 
of  Da  vies  &  Co.  has  taken  over  the  "Kukaiau," 
one  of  the  largest  sugar  plantations  in  Hawaii 

The  National  Conduit  and  Cable  Company,  one 
of  the  largest  consumers  of  the  metal,  continues 
bullish,  as  indicated  by  its  current  monthly  cir- 
cular, which  says  that  "the  world's  demand  is  now 
able  to  prevent  any  accumulation  at  any  of  the 
leading  centres."  The  signincancc  of  this  state- 
ment becomes  all  the  more  pronoonced  as  it  fol- 
lows an  earlier  statement  to  the  effect  that  this 
year's  production  of  copper  will  be  at  an  unpre- 
cedented rate.  It  hardly  seemed  possible  that  the 
selling  price  of  copper  could  be  lifted  from  12^ 
to  1714  within  a  little  over  eight  months,  and  yet 


TOWN  TALK 

this  is  exactly  what  has  occurred.  .\nd  coincident 
with  the  rising  tide  of  values  an  enormous  baying 
movement  developed  on  both  sides  of  the  ocean, 
revealing  a  revival  of  confidence  absolutely  im- 
possible a  year  ago.  Domestic  prices  arc  now  the 
highest  in  over  four  years,  and  predictions  of 
further  substantial  advances  are  made  by  en- 
thusiastic believers  in  aerial  market  flights.  It 
must  strike  every  sensible  student  of  the  copper 
simation,  however,  that  it  is  essential  to  the  best 
interests  of  every  one  that  market  values  are  kept 
at  a  reasonable  level.  .\  repetition  of  the  blunder 
of  1907  should  not  be  permitted. 


The  Gypsy 

(Coatinned  from  Pa^  8.) 

She  looked  and  she  looked,  and  she  tried  to  find 
out  the  secret  of  her  recent  success.  She  is  really 
beautiful,  really  interesting  in  the  gypsy  costnme. 
But  she  cannot  put  it  on  the  following  day;  there- 
fore tomorrow  she  would  become  again  tbe  or- 
dinary Lisa,  so  like  unto  thousands  of  others. 
She  removed  the  clasp  from  her  hair,  and  it  ap- 
peared to  her  as  if  she  were  casting  away  a  for- 
tune with  her  own  hands. 

She  pinned  the  clasp  again  to  her  hair. 

Fortune  had  come. 

But  how  can  she  retain  it? 

She  cannot  go  around  every  day  in  gypsy  cos- 
tume. If  she  would  put  it  on  tomorrow  and  go 
Oct  upon  the  street,  would  they  not  ridicule  her? 

What  is  this  thing.  Lisa  thinks,  in  fear  and 
dread. 

She  has  already  grasped  fortune.  She  possesses 
it,  yet  she  cannot  retain  it. 

By  accident  she  bounded  into  luck,  but  it  lasted 
for  a  night  only. 

How  many  nights,  long  and  dreary,  will  she  be 
forced  to  wait  till  fortune  comes  again?  And  will 
it  ever  come?  Xo!  The  luck  would  never  re- 
turn. 

How  extraordinary,  how  strange!  Her  fate 
lies  in  a  gypsy  costume — in  a  clasp — in  a  red 
shawl,  and  loose  flowing  hair. 

She  pressed  her  lips  together  in  a  bitter  smile. 

"Wild  and  foolish  are  your  hopes,"  the  gypsy 
answered  her  from  the  glass,  and  angrily  Lisa 
pulled  the  clasp  from  her  hair,  the  red  shawl 
from  her  shoulders. 

"Gene,  fortune  I  Ha,  ha,  ha  I"  and  she  broke 
out  in  hysterical  laughter. 

V^r-.ir  -he  was  bet  an  ordinary  g:-' 


Photographs 

Whigham's  Art  Studios 

739  Market  Street,  Cpp.  GrMt  Avesac 
1615  Fillmore  Street.  Near  Geary 
Phone*:         We*t  7831         Home  J  1223        S  3757 
San  Francisco 


Jnly  6.  1912 

Varied  Types 

(CoctinDCti  from  Page  7.) 

I  saw  right  away  what  I  was  up  against  We 
talked  it  over  and  I  made  an  engagement  to 
meet  Ruef  at  the  Pup  restaurant  the  night  before 
the  day  Schmitz  took  office.  To  show  me  how 
things  stood,  he  handed  me  a  letter  that  he  had 
just  written.  It  was  a  letter  addressed  to  him- 
self, which,  he  said,  he  was  waiting  to  have 
Schmitz  sign.  It  was  the  letter  published  the  next 
day.  the  letter  serving  notice  on  everybody  who  had 
business  with  the  city  to  'see'  Ruef.  You  re- 
member it,  don't  you?" 

I  remembered  it  very  welL 

"Pretty  raw,  wasn't  it?"  Kelly  asked. 

Yes,  it  was  pretty  raw. 

"Well  you  can  see,"  Kelly  observed  with  a 
broad  smile,  "that  the  bright  young  lawyer  cor- 
rupted by  the  bosses  was  in  need  of  a  g^nardian 
to  keep  him  out  of  jail.  Ruef  always  thought 
that  because  he  was  a  lawyer  he  could  go  much 
further  than  any  ordinary  boss.  He  used  to  tell 
us  that  his  relations  in  politics  were  the  relations 
of  attorney  and  client  He  thought  he  had  a 
cinch,  and  when  he  had  full  swing  with  nobody 
to  hold  him  he  put  his  neck  in  the  halter.  Bah! 
he  didn't  even  have  a  sense  of  the  honor  that's 
among  thieves.  His  business  went  to  smash  be- 
cause he  didn't  deal  squarely  with  the  supervisors. 
He  gave  one  man  more  than  another,  made  them 
suspicious  of  one  another,  till  they  began  doing 
business  on  their  own  hook." 

You  can  see  that  Martin  Kelly,  the  boss  of  the 
old    school    that    recognized    certain  inviolable 
ethics  has  given  much  thought  to  the  downfall 
of  Ruef.  and  that  he  has  accounted  for  it  oa  a 
very  plausible  theory.    What  he  likes  to  emphas- 
ize and  drive  home  is  that  Ruef  is  in  jail  not 
because  of  the  firm  of  Kelly  and  Crimmins  but 
because  he  did  not  have  the  benefit  of  the  re- 
straints which  it  was  the  custom  of  that  firm  to 
impose.    "It  was  all  I  could  do."  said  Kelly,  "to 
keep  him  straight  at  the  Santa  Cruz  convention. 
I  went  down  there  with  him.  and  I  pointed  out 
that  as  he  had  the  balance  of  power  he  might  by 
using  it  judiciously  'oecome  a  State  boss.  Pardee 
was  willing  to  make  any  kind  of  deal  with  him 
He'd  promise  him  anything  for  his  delegates.  V 
I  told  him  that  the  doctor  wasn't  straight,  tV 
he  couldn't  be  depended  on.    Ruef  wanted  " 
name  Mr.  Hayes  of  San  Jose,  but  Hayes  didr.  : 
have  a  chance.    Ruef  finally  stood  in  with  the 
program,  but  he  acted  in  such  a  way  that  V 
didn't  do  himself  much  good.    The  trouble  »  ' 
Ruef  was  he  was  too  avaricious." 

Martin    Kelly    concluded    that    he  had 
enough  about  Ruef.    But  before  going  he  had 
few  words  to  say  about  the  present  state 
politics.    "Things  are  in  quite  a  mess  now." 
observed,  "and  I  feel  somewhat  responsible  f  - 
conditions  in  this  State." 

"How  is  that?"  I  asked. 

"Well  you  see,"  he  said,  "I  became  a  reform  .  - 
some  years  ago.  You  know  I  drew  the  hr-t 
primary  law  ever  drawn  in  this  State.  It  wa- 
declared  unconstitutional,  but  the  meat  of  it  wri-; 
handed  down.  Yes.  I  think  I  started  this  reforn 
wave,  and  I'm  afraid  God  will  punish  men  t'j- 
my  sins.  I  know  the  people  will  never  forgiv- 
me — when  they  wake  up." 

.\nd  Martin  looked  the  part  of  the  penitent 
sinner. 


DIVIDEND  NOTICE 
HUMBOLDT  S.WINGs  B.\.NK.  783  Mak«  St.,  ntar  J  h 
For  the  half  year  ending  Jane  30.  1912.  a  diridn'i  ha 
been  declared  at  the  rate  of  foar  (4)  per  cent  per  annum 
on  all  saving*  deposits,  free  oi  taxes,  payable  on  and  after 
Monday,  July  1.  1912.  DiTidends  not  called  for  are  added 
to  and  bear  the  same  rate  of  interest  as  the  principal  fro« 
July  1,  1912.    H.  C  KLEVES.\HL.  Cashier. 


ANGLO  &  LONDON 
PARIS  NATIONAL  DANK 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

PAfO-UP    CAPITAL  »^.000.000 

Suepuis  AND  uMOnccD  p«o«^rrs     s  i.eoo  ooo 

TCfTAC  RESOURCES  t40.000  000 

OFFICERS 
HESBEBT    FLEISHHACKER  PRCSlOEMT 
$16.    GREEN  ESAUM         CHAIS  MAM  OF  THE  BOAAS 


JOS  frieclandeb 

C    F  HUNT 

«  ALTSCHUl. 

C  a  PARKER 

WH  H  HIGH 

H  CHOYMSKI 

6  R  BURDICK 

A    L   LANG  E  B  »"  A  V 


V1CE-PPESI0EMT 
VICE-PRESIOEMT 
CASHIER 
ASSISTAMT  CASHIER 
ASSISTANT  CASHIER 
ASSISTAJfT  CASHIER 
ASSiSTAMT  CASHIER 
SEC BETA BY 


July  6,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


23 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  Caliiornia,  in  and  foi 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,177; 
Department  No.  10. 

CLARA  JESSURUN,  Plaintiff,  vs.  WALTER  S.  JES- 
SURUN,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Walter  S.  Jessurun,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  directed  to  appear  and  answer  the  com- 
plaint in  an  action  entitled  as  above  brought  against  you 
in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  within  ten  days 
after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons — if  served  within 
this  City  and  County;  or  within  thirty  days  if  served  else- 
where. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  money  or  damages  in  the  complaint  as 
arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court  for  any 
other  relief  demanded  in  the  complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
at  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, this  7th  day  of  May,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  L  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  H.  L  PORTER,  Deputy  Clerk. 
HENRY  ACH,   Atty.   for  Plaintiff, 

Rooms   316-320   Balboa    Building,   Southeast    Corner  ot 
Market  and  Second  Sts.,  San  Francisco,  Cai.    .S- 18-10 

CERTIFICATE  OF  NAME  OF  BUSINESS 

I,  the  undersigned,  Victor  R.  Ulman,  do  hereby  state 
that  I  am  engaged  in  business  and  am  doing  business  in  the 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  California,  un- 
der the  name  and  style  of  Victor  R.  Ulman  &  Co. 

That  I  am  the  only  one  interested  in  the  said  business 
and  that  I  am  the  sole  owner  thereof. 

That  my  name  and  residence  is  as  follows:  Victor  R. 
Ulman,  314  Locust  Street,  in  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco,  State  of  California. 

That  my  place  of  business  is  No.  149  New  Montgomery 
Street,  in  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of 
California. 

Dated  at  San  Francisco,  Cal.,  this  11th  day  of  .Tune,  1912. 

VICTOR   R.  ULMAN. 

STATE  OF  CALIFORNIA, 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — ss. 

On  this  nth  day  of  June,  1912,  before  me,  Julius  Cal- 
mann,  a  Notary  Public  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  State  of  California,  residing  therem,  duly 
commissioned  and  sworn,  personally  appeared  Victor  R. 
Ulman,  known  to  me  to  be  the  person  whose  name  is  sub- 
scribed to  the  foregoing  instrument,  and  he  acknowledged 
to  me  that  he  executed  the  same. 

In  witness  whereof,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and 
affixed  my  official  seal  at  my  office  in  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  State  of  California,  the  day  and  year  m 
this   certificate   first   above  written. 

(Seal)  JULIUS  CALMANN, 

Notary  Public  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, State  of  California. 
OTTO    IRVING  WISE,  Atty.   at  Law, 

First  National  Bank  Bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-15-5 

NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 

Estate  of  ELIA  DUTEIL  (also  called  ELIA  OZANNE), 
Deceased. 

Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  undersigned  Executor  of 
the  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  Elia  Duteil  (also  called 
Elia  Ozanne),  deceased,  to  the  creditors  of  and  all  persons 
having  claims  against  the  said  deceased,  to  exhibit  them 
with  the  necessary  vouchers  within  ten  (10)  months  after 
the  first  publication  of  this  notice  to  the  said  Executor  at 
his  law  office  No.  333  Kearny  Street,  San  Francisco,  Cali- 
fornia, which  said  office  the  undersigned  selects  as  his  place 
of  business  in  all  matters  connected  with  said  estate  of 
Elia  Duteil   (also  called   Elia  Ozanne),  deceased. 

A.  COMTE,  JR., 
Executor  of  the  Last  Will  and  Testament  of  Elia  Duteil 
(also    called    Elia    Ozanne),  Deceased. 

Dated,  San  Francisco,  Tune  8,  A.  D.  1912. 
A.  COMTE,  JR.,  in  Pro.  Per.  6-8-5 

ORDER    TO    SHOW   CAUSE   WHY    SALE   OF  REAL 
REAL  ESTATE  SHOULD  NOT  BE  MADE 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  12,438; 
Department  No.  10. 
In    the    Matter   of   the    Estate   of   MAJOR  CONWAY, 
Deceased.  . 

Annie  Conway,  the  Administratrix  of  the  estate  of  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  having  filed  in  this  Court  her  petition 
for  an  order  to  sell  the  real  estate  of  said  decedent  for 
the  purposes  therein  set  forth,  and  it  appearing  from  said 
petition  that  it  is  necessary  to  sell  the  whole  or  some  por- 
tion of  said  real  estate,  and  good  cause  appearing  there- 

Now  therefore,  it  is  hereby  ordered,  adjudged  and  decreed 
that  all  persons  interested  in  the  said  estate  of  said  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  be  and  appear  before  the  above  en- 
titled Court,  Department  No.  10  thereof,  on  Wednesday, 
the  31st  day  of  July,  1912,  at  10  o'clock  a.  m.  of  said  day, 
at  the  Courtroom  of  said  Court,  Room  No.  519,  in  the 
temporary  City  Hall  on  Market  Street  near  Eighth  Street, 
in  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, then  and  there  to  show  cause  why  an  order  should 
not  he  granted  to  the  said  Administratrix  to  sell  the  whole 
or  some  portion  of  the  real  estate  of  said  deceased. 

Tt  is  further  ordered  that  a  copy  of  said  order  be  pub- 
lished for  at  least  four  successive  weeks  in  "Town  Talk," 
a  newspaper  printed  and  published  in  the  said  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco. 

Done  in  open  Court  this  2Ist  day  of  June,  1912. 

(Signed)       THOMAS  F.  GRAHAM, 

Judge. 

HUGH  K.  McKEVITT.  .\tty.  for  Administratrix, 

Hearst  Bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-29-5 

DIVIDEND  NOTICE 

FRENCH-AMERIC.\N  BANK  OF  SAVINGS  (Savings 
Department),  108  Sutter  Street.  For  the  half  year  ending 
June  30,  1912,  a  dividend  has  been  declared  at  the  rate  of 
four  (4)  per  cent  per  annum  on  all  deposits,  free  of  taxes, 
payable  on  and  after  Monday,  July  1,  1912.  Dividends 
not  called  for  are  added  to  and  bear  the  same  rate  of 
interest  as  the  principal  from  July  1,  1912. 

A.  LEGALLET,  President.  2 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,026; 
Department   No.  10. 

LUCILE  V.  LARM,  Plaintiff,  vs.  G.  LARM,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California,  Send  Greeting  to: 
G.  Larm,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  Required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  Summons,  if  served 
within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere  within 
thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and 
decree  of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony 
now  existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  Wilful  Desertion  and  Habitual  Intemperance; 
also  fr>r  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in  the 
Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby  made. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take  judg- 
ment for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the  Com- 
plaint as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court 
for  any  other  relief  demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San   Francisco,  this  27th  day  of  April.  A.   D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  1.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH,  Deputy  Clerk. 
McGOWAN  and  WESTLAKE,  Attys.  for  Plaintiff, 

Humboldt  Bank  Bldg..  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-1-10 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  43,036; 
Department  No.  10. 

LOI-  ETTA  WILMOTH.  Plaintiff,  vs.  HOWARD 
WELLINGTON  WILMOTH,  Defendant. 

.\ction  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Howard   Wellington   Wilmoth,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons,  if 
served  within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere 
within    thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and  de- 
cree of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony  now 
existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  willful  desertion  and  willful  neglect  of  plain- 
tiff; also  for  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in 
the  Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby 
made. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear 
and  answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the 
Complaint  as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the 
Court    for   any   other   relief   demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  26th  day  of  June,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.   I.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH,  Deputy  Clerk. 
M.   M.  GETZ,  ROBINSON  &  GETZ.  Atty.  for  Plaintiff, 
45  Kearny  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-29-10 


DIVIDEND  NOTICE 

TTTE  GERMAN  SAVINGS  AND  LOAN  SOCIETY  (The 
German  Bank),  526  California  St.  Mission  Branch,  2572 
Mission  St.  near  22d.  Richmond  District  Branch,  601 
Clement  St.  corner  7th  Ave.  Haight  St.  Branch,  1456 
Haight  St.  bet.  Masonic  and  Ashbury.  For  the  half  year 
ending  June  30,  1912,  a  dividend  has  been  declared  at  the 
rate  of  four  (4)  per  cent  per  annum  on  all  deposits,  free 
of  taxes,  payable  on  and  after  Monday,  July  1,  1912.  Divid- 
ends not  called  for  are  added  to  the  deposit  account  and 
earn  dividends  from  July  1,  1912.  GEORGE  TOURNY, 
Manager.  2 


5%  Per  Month 

SAVED  on  the  Investment  by  Buying 

THE 

ALASKA  REFRIGERATOR 

900.000  SOLD  SINCE  1878 

We    have    a    Test    Refrigerator   to   prove    what  we 
claim   for  it.    Please  call   and   see  it. 
Pacific  Coast  Agents 

W.  W.  MONTAGUE  &  CO. 

557-563  MARKET  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


Patrick  &  Company 

RUBBER  STAMPS 

Stencils,  Seals,  Signs,  Etc. 

560  Market  Street  San  Francisco 


Phones,   Pacific   Douglas  4113;   Home   C  2519 
Typewriters  Rented  and  Inspected 

WALTER  J.  WOLF 

Rebuilt  Typewriters 
Expert  Repairing 

SUPPLIES  FOR  ALL  MAKES  OF  MACHINES 
CARBON    PAPERS   AND   OFFICE  SUPPLIES 

307  Bush  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


VALUABLE  INFORMATION 

Of  a  Business,  Personal  or  Social  Nature 
from  the  Press  of  the  Pacific  Coast 

DAKES'  PRESS  CLIPPING  BUREAU 

12  GEARY  STREET,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phones,  Kearny  1440  and  Home  C  1470 

.  432  S.  MAIN  STREET,  LOS  ANGELES 

Phones,  F  1289  and  Main  4133 

Clippings  Served  from  5c  to  $5  per  Month 
Order  Now.    Stop  When  You  Please 
Pay  for  What  You  Get 


Ofiice  Phone,  Kearny  57    Residence  Phone.  Market  4863 

DR.  A.  H.  WRIGHT 


1  to  4  and  7  to  8 


CHRONICLE  BLDG. 


KNIGHT  &  HEGGERTY 

Attorneys  at  Law  and  Proctors  in  Admiralty 
CROCKER   BUILDING  Rooms  807-810 

Telephone  Kearny  4145 


HENRY  P.  TRICOU 

NOTARY  PUBLIC 
508  CALIFORNIA  ST.  Phone  Kearny  371 

Residence,  882  Grove  St.    Phone  Park  1870 


NEWSPAPER  ART  LEAGUE 

Commercial  Art  and  Commercial 
Photography  of  All  Kinds 

Speculative  Drawings  and  Bids  Submitted  upon  Request 

185  STEVENSON  STREET 

ROOMS  306-308  Phone  Sutter  1024 


DO  YOUR  EYES  TROUBLE  YOU? 

If  so  consult  George  Mayerle,  the  German  Optical  Expert,  whose  professional  services 
have  been  appreciated  and  acknowledged  by  most  eminent  men. 

Mayerie's  German  Eye-Water,  the  greatest  eye  tonic  in  the  world,  at  reliable  druggists, 
50c,  or  by  mail  from  San  Francisco,  65c. 

VVhen  your  eye-glasses  or  spectacles  blur  or  tire  the  eyes,  wipe  them  with  Mayerie's  An- 
tiseptic eye-glass  cleaner.  This  is  a  specially  prepared  chemical  cloth  for  polishing  lenses, 
opera,  field  and  marine  glasses. 

It  removes  all  stains  and  blemishes  immediately  without  sw.atching.    By  mail,  3  for  25c. 

Established  18  Years.    Always  look  for  tbe  name,  Mayerle 

George  Mayerle  cerman  optical  institute 


960  MARKET  ST., 


SAN  FRANCISCO 


PACIFIC  PRINTING  CO.G^^^t)88  FIRST  ST.,  S.  F. 


Vol.  XX.    No.  1038 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  JULY  13,  1912 


PRICE,  10  CENTS 


NEW 
TELEPHONE 
DIRECTORY 


NOTICE 
TO  SUBSCRIBERS 

In  this  Directory  all  telephone  numbers  are  listed 
AFTER  the  subscriber's  name  and  address,  instead  of 
BEFORE  the  name  as  in  previous  issues.  This  change  has 
been  made  to  assist  in  preventing  the  calling  of  wrong  num- 
bers by  subscribers,  where  similar  names  are  involved,  as 
under  this  plan  the  street  address  will  be  read  by  the  person 
making  the  call  and  thus  serve  as  a  check  in  calling  the 
proper  number. 

THE  PACIFIC  TELEPHONE 
AND  TELEGRAPH  CO. 


One  System 


—  One  Policy  ■ 


■  Universal  Service 


Leading'  Hotels  and  Resorts 


00 


IN  THE  GOOD  OLD  SUMMER  TIME 

we  want  you  at 

Hotel  Del  Monte  or  Pacific  Grove  Hotel 

where  we  have  the  most  glorious  chmate  on  the  coast;  never  a  hot 
day.  Here  you  can  Golf.  Motor.  Ride,  Swim,  and  Fish  with  perfect 
comfort. 

OUR  GOLF  COURSE 

is  now  pronounced  the  best  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  and  equal  to  any  in 
the  Eastern  States.     IVrife  for  rates  and  literature  to 

H.  R.  WARNER,  Del  Monte,  California 


H     I    COr'oNAOO  BEAChN^ALIfORNIA"\^5v 


/^ORONADO'S  excollcnt  winter  climate  is  sur- 
^  pass'^d  only  by  its  superb  bummer.  Open  the 
year  round  this  famous  hotel  is  the  mecca  oi  tour- 
ists from  every  State  Ciolf.  Tennis.  Bay  and  Surf 
Hathinu  are  amon«  tlie  many  attractions.  Sea 
fishing  better  than  eoer  before.  New  Sail  and  hishing 
IioaI>.     Write  for  booklet. 

H.  W.  Wills,  Manacer,  Corooado,  Cal.  er 
H.  F.  Norcrois,  Act,  334  So.  Spring  St.,  Los  Angeles,  CaL 


CLIFF  HOUSE 

SAN    FRANCISCO'S    MOST    FAMOUS  RESORT 

Unsurpassed  Cuisine 

(a   la    carte  service) 

Dancing  in  Ball  Room  Every  Evening 
Private  Banquet  and  Dining  Rooms 
Friday  Fish  Dinner 

(tabic  d'hote) 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Entertainment 


PARAISO 

HOT  SPRINGS 

Grandest  and   Most  Accessible. 
California's  Real  Paradise 

Only  four  liours  from  San  Francisco.  Wonderful 
natural  hot  soda  and  sulphur;  guaranteed  for 
rheumatism,  liver,  kidney  and  malaria,  all  stomach 
troubles.  Expert  masseurs.  Rates  $12  to  $16,  in- 
cluding baths.  Round  trip,  $6.35,  including  auto. 
Autos  running  daily.  Leave  Third  and  Townsend 
7  a.  m.  and  4  p.  m.  Booklets  Peck-Judah,  687 
Market  street. 

H.  H.  McGOWAN,  Proprietor  and  Manager, 
Paraiso  Springs,  Monterey  County 


CASA  DEL  REY 


New  300-room,  fire-proof  hotel 
located  near  the  beach 
and  Casino. 


OPEN  ALL  YEAR  ROUND 
AMERICAN  PLAN 


Tennis  Courts,  Good  Boating', 
Bathing- and  Mshing.  Numer- 
ous drives  along  the  Coast 
and  through  the  Mountains. 

SUPERIOR  GOLFING 


Santa  Cruz  Beach  Hotel  Co. 


CASTLE  CRAGS  FARM 

NEAR  MT.  SHASTA 

California's  Most  Delightful  Mountain 
Resort 

Real  pine  log  cabins,  with  great  stone 
fireplaces;  hot  and  cold  shower  baths;  elec- 
tric lights;  fine  table  with  home  cooking. 


HOTEL  VICTORIA 

COR.  BUSH  AND  STOCKTON  STS. 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

.•\  downtown  residence  hotel  of  the  high- 
est order,  appealing  particularly  to  those 
who  value  comfort  and  convenience  more 
than  mere  ostentation  and  who  appreciate 
excellence  of  cuisine  and  service  at  mod- 
erate expense. 

American  Plan,  from  $3.00  per  day  up 
European  Plan,  from  $1.50  per  day  up 

For  rates  and  rrs'  r\ ations  address 

MRS.  W.  F.  MORRIS 

Proprietor 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


HOTEL  ST.  FRANCIS 


Turkish  Baths 

12th  Floor 
Ladies  Hair  Dressing  Parlors 

2d  Floor 
Cafe 

White  and  Gold  Restaurant 

Lobby  Floor 
Electric  Grill 
Barber  Shop 

Basement,  Geary  St.  entrance 

Under  the  Management  of  James  Woods 


PALACE  HOTEL 

Situated  on  Market  Street 
In  the  Center  of  the  City 

Take  Any  Market  Street  Car  from  the  Ferry 

FAIRMONT  HOTEL 

The  .Mo>t  Beautifully  Situated  of  Any  City 
Hotel  in  the  World 

Take  Sacramento  Street  Cars  from  the  Ferry 

TWO  GRE.JlT  hotels 
LNDEK  THE  M.^^•AGEMENT  OF  THE 
PALACE  HOTEL  COMPANY 


Hotel  Rowardennan 


BEN  LOMOND.  CAL. 


In  the  Mountains  by  the  Sea 
Open  All  Year  Round 
Under   New  Management 
Rates  $17.50  to  $25.00  per  Week 
Excellent  Cuisine  and  Service 
Automobile   parties   will    find   this   resort   a  good 
place  to   stop   at.    Fishing   season   now  open, 
information  and  booklet,  address, 

J.  M.  SHOULTS 

Ben   Lomond,  CaL 

Or  the  Pcck-Tudah  Co.,  San  Francisco. 


For 


Golf,  Bathe  and  Rest  at 

Paso  Robles  Hot  Springs 

Five  Hours  from  San  Francisco 


WILLOW  RANCH 

REDWOOD  HEIGHTS-'Grandcst  view  of  the 
Santa  Cruz  Mountains;  overlooking  ocean  and  beach. 
Delightfully  located  in  the  Redwoods,  5  miles  from 
Santa  Cruz.  Spring  water.  Excellent  table,  bath 
houses,  swimming  pool,  dance  pavilion,  hunting  and 
fishing.  Splendid  auto  service  free.  Daily  mail. 
Phone  Santa  Cruz  8  J  13.    $8.00  per  week. 

MRS.   M.  J.  CRANDELL, 
Santa  Cruz,  Cal. 


GILROY  HOT  SPRINGS 

SANTA  CLARA  CO. 

Most  favorably  noted  for  its  health-healing  waters, 
ideal  climate,  grand  mountain  scenery  and  first-class 
table. 

Only   four   hours   from   San    Francisco,  including 
delightful  stage  ride  over  the  best  kept  mountain  road 
in  California.    Hunting  and  trout  fishing.    Send  for 
booklet  or  see   Pcck-Judah,  687  Market  street. 
W.  J.  McDonald.  Proprietor 


TOWN  TALK 

THE   PACIFIC  WEEKLY 


Vol.  XX. 


Published  Weekly  by 
PACIFIC  PUBLICATION  COMPANY  (Inc.) 
88  First  Street,  San  Francisco 
Phone  Douglas  2612 

Theodore   F.    Bonnet  Editor 

Chas.  W.  Raymond  Business  Manager 


SUBSCRIPTION— One  year,  in  advance,  $4.00;  six 
months,  $2.25;  three  months,  $1.30;  single  copies,  10  cents. 
Foreign  subscriptions  (countries  in  Postal  Union),  $5.00 
per  year.    For  sale  by  all  Newsdealers. 

Entered  at  the  San  Francisco  Post  Office  as  second-class 
matter. 

The  trade  supplied  direct  by  us. 

For  foreign  and  local  advertising  rates  address  88  First 
street,  San  Francisco. 

New  York  office,  37-39  East  Twenty-eighth  street.  Fredenc 
M.   Krugler,  representative. 

Los   Angeles   office,   432    South    Main  street. 

We  decline  to  return  or  to  enter  into  correspondence  as 
to  rejected  communications;  and  to  this  rule  we  can  make 
no  exception.  Manuscripts  not  acknowledged  within  four 
weeks  are  rejected^  


The  Friend  of  the  People 

It  has  been  said  tliat  whatever  is  popular 
deserves  attention.  Unfortunately  what- 
ever is  popular  escapes  analysis.  The  mob 
is  emotional,  nothing  else;  it  loves  with  no 
more  reason  than  it  hates.  Hence  the  suc- 
cess in  all  ages,  among  all  people,  of  the 
man  who  deliberately  plays  the  demagogue. 
More  than  a  century  ago  there  lived  in  the 
Rue  des  Cordeliers  in  Paris,  a  Progressive 
politician,  an  ardent  reformer.  His  name 
was  Marat.  He  was  the  editor  of  L'Ami 
du  Peuple.  All  Paris  knew  him  as  the 
"People's  Friend."  The  people  loved  him, 
and  when,  in  the  convention,  he  called  for 
"heads"  they  were  always  forthcoming. 
With  the  assistance  of  Robespierre  and 
Danton  he  was  slowly  floating  France  in 
blood.  One  day,  a  good  woman,  Charlotte 
Corday  plunged  a  dagger  into  his  breast, 
and  he  never  breathed  again.  Paris  was  in 
consternation  and  in  mourning.  In  the 
streets  men  repeated  like  a  tragic  chorus 
"II  est  mort,  1'  Ami  du  People!  1'  Ami  du 
Peuple  est  mort !"  The  Jacobins  dressed  his 
bust  in  crepe.  The  Convention  voted  him 
to  the  Pantheon.  An  immense  concourse 
conducted  the  body  to  the  grave.  Twenty 
orators  spoke  at  his  tomb.  Sculptors  carved 
his  features  with  the  glory  of  the  Agonist, 
twisting  his  headband  into  something  of 
semblance  to  a  crown  of  thorns.  In  the 
course  of  time  a  journalist  scrutinizing 
some  manuscripts  of  the  deceased  discov- 
ered a  passage  advocating  monarchy.  The 
fact  was  made  public.  "What !  Marat,  the 
People's  Friend,  a  royalist?  "Le  miserable!" 
The  rabble  rose  in  its  rage,  burnt  him  in 
effigy,  scraped  up  the  ashes,  put  them  in  an 
urn,  and  carrying  it  along  with  ribaldry 
and  execration,  flung  it  down  a  sewer  of  the 
Rue  Montmartre.  In  all  the  years  that 
elapsed  since  that  memorable  "second 
funeral"  of  Marat  no  change  has  been 
wrought  in  human  nature.  The  self-pro- 
claimed People's  Friend  must  die  to  be 
properly  appraised.  In  life  there  is  no  in- 
famy he  cannot  live  down.    Marat  was  in- 


San  Francisco,  July  13,  1912 


famous  even  before  he  was  taken  to  the 
bosom  of  the  people.  They  cared  naught 
for  his  infamies.  By  affirming  himself  to 
be  a  friend  of  the  people  an  American  cit- 
izen acquires  a  franchise  for  anything  from 
pitch-and-toss  to  manslaughter.  By  merely 
keeping  out  of  jail  and  demanding  more 
power  for  the  people  some  men  have  estab- 
lished a  title  to  all  the  virtues.  We  have 
two  men  running  for  President  the  samples 
of  whose  matchless  mendacity  might  stand 
as  models  for  all  future  generations.  If  it 
were  not  for  their  professed  friendship  for 
the  people  their  conduct  in  their  relations 
with  their  own  personal  friends  might  cause 
it  to  be  taken  for  granted  that  they  aspired 
not  to  political  power  but  to  eternal  in- 
famy; yet  when  they  go  about  with  the  stars 
mirrored  in  their  eyes,  and  the  swish  of 
their  coat-tails  is  heard,  the  multitude  pricks 
its  long  ears  and  thinks  it  hears  the  rustling 
of  angels'  wings. 

Party  Spirit 

"There  has  never  been  a  clearer  justifica- 
tion than  there  is  now  for  a  new  party," 
says  the  Evening  Mail  of  New  York.  What 
the  justification  is  the  Mail  does  not  make 
clear,  but  doubtless  the  Mail  is  sincere. 
Likewise  the  Pittsburg  Leader,  a  Roosevelt 
paper,  which  says  "The  Nation's  crisis  has 
arrived";  also  that  "the  billions  of  the  great 
interests,  piled  up  like  mountains  are 
matched  against  the  lives  of  the  people,  men, 
women  and  children."  The  editors  that  say 
these  queer  things  are  aflame  with  what  is 
known  as  "party  spirit,"  and  "party  spirit" 
is  the  most  ravishing  of  all  intoxicants, 
affecting  as  it  does  the  heart  as  well  as  the 
mind.  Stern  warnings  against  it  have  come 
down  to  us  through  the  ages,  but  in  vain. 
We  are  told  that  it  reverses  all  the  prin- 
ciples which  a  benevolent  nature  dictates, 
that  it  "enlists  a  man's  virtues  in  the  cause 
of  his  vices,"  and  that  no  sophism  is  too 
gross  to  delude  minds  disordered  by  it. 
It  is  the  penalty  that  God  imposes  on  his 
creatures  when  they  disdain  the  rule  of  a 
tyrant.  All  political  philosophers  have 
written  about  it,  but  none  of  them  ever 
hoped  to  see  it  extinguished.  George 
Washington  spoke  of  it  in  his  Farewell  Ad- 
dress. He  said  that  it  produced  "the  most 
horrid  enormities,"  and  that  "it  gradually  in- 
clines the  minds  of  men  to  seek  security  and 
repose  in  the  absolute  power  of  an  individ- 
ual" who  eventually  avails  himself  of  party 
spirit  "to  the  purposes  of  his  own  eleva- 
tion on  the  ruins  of  Public  Liberty."  Per- 
haps it  ought  to  be  a  consolation  and  a 
moral  strengthening  to  all  of  us  that  the 
greatest  man  since  Washington,  according 
to  the  conception  of  many  people,  is  not  at 
all  averse  to  the  rousing  of  public  spirit;  is 


No.  1038 


indeed  strongly  in  favor  of  it.  Fle  says : 
"This  has  now  become  a  contest  which  can- 
not be  settled  merely  along  the  old  party 
lines.  The  principles  that  are  at  stake  are 
as  broad  and  as  deep  as  the  foundations  of 
our  Democracy  itself."  This  great  man  is 
party  spirit  incarnate.  He  is  the  very 
vortex  of  party  dissension.  All  interests 
and  considerations  are  subservient  to  the 
principle  of  attachment  to  his  person.  The 
only  original  sin  is  that  of  declining  to  re- 
gard him  as  a  demi-Atlas  engaged  in  prop- 
ping a  declining  world.  This  is  no  time  to 
stand  on  trifles  and  moot-points.  The 
grand  object  to  be  achieved  is  the  elevation 
of  this  great  man  to  high  office,  and  this 
must  be  achieved  though  sun  and  moon  be 
in  the  flat  sea  sunk.  Now  this  is  no  new 
experience  in  the  history  of  politics.  Nor 
are  the  sentiments  of  our  great  man  orig- 
inal. History  is  full  of  mischief-makers 
who  expressed  precisely  the  same  senti- 
ments. Not  one  of  them  but  insisted  that 
attachment  to  himself  meant  attachment  to 
a  great  principle.  And  all  of  them  were 
leaders  of  party  loved  and  adored  by  simple- 
minded  patriots  blind  to  the  fact  that  what 
they  regarded  as  zeal  for  the  public  good 
was  nothing  but  chaotic  vanity  employing 
a  shibboleth  as  the  stalking  horse  to  am- 
bition. 


The  Paramount  Principle 

What  is  the  "nation's  great  crisis,"  which 
has  arrived,  according  to  the  followers  of 
Roosevelt?  What  is  it  that  the  former 
President  purposes  doing  in  the  event  of 
his  election?  What  are  the  principles  for 
which  nobody  else  stands?  These  are  ques- 
tions for  which  it  has  not  been  easy  to  find 
answers  in  the  mass  of  verbiage  accumulat- 
ing in  the  public  prints.  We  have  been  get- 
ting chiefly  glittering  generalities.  A  good 
deal  is  said  about  the  Colonel's  hostility  to 
the  predatory  rich,  but  it  is  no  secret  that 
the  sinews  of  war  are  supplied  by  George 
W.  Perkins,  Dan  Hanna  and  Frank  Mun- 
sey  of  the  steel  trust.  Nor  is  to  be  gainsaid 
that  the  Colonel  has  the  friendship  and 
President  Taft  the  emnity  of  the  harvester 
combine  and  the  National  Cash  Register 
Company.  And  it  was  only  the  other  day  in 
the  course  of  the  Money  Trust  investiga- 
tion we  learned  that  it  was  Mr.  Roosevelt, 
when  he  was  President,  who  went  to  the 
rescue  of  the  panic-stricken  gamblers  of  the 
stock-market  in  October,  1907,  allowing  Mr. 
Morgan  to  draw  $2.S.000,000  from  the  Treas- 
ury for  the  accommodation  of  the  neces- 
sitous. Mr.  Morgan  is  surely  not  opposed 
to  the  Colonel.  The  trust  magnate  is  not 
ungrateful.  He  owes  much  to  Mr.  Roose- 
velt. Ever  since  the  panic  he  has  been 
celebrated  as  "the  uncrowned  king  of  fin- 


4 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


ance"  for  what  he  did  in  that  memorable 
month  of  October.    In  other  words  he  has 
been    glorified    under   a  misapprehension. 
His  most  intimate  friends  were  unaware 
that  it  was  the  Colonel  who  put  up  the 
money.    In  the  circumstances  one  is  jus- 
tified in  being  cynical  when  told  that  "the 
billions  of  the  great  interests,  piled  up  like 
mountains  are  matched  against  the  lives  of 
the  people,"  which  lives  are  represented  by 
the  standard  bearer  of  the  Bull  Moose  ticket. 
Even  the  Colonel  himself  has  ceased  to  pre- 
tend that  he  is  the  mighty  hunter  of  the 
Money  Devil.    He  is  shrewed  enough  to 
perceive  that  the  pretension  is  too  raw. 
And  so  he  has  attached  other  strings  to  his 
harp.    Indeed   he   is   getting  new  strings 
every  day.    Just  before  leaving  Chicago  for 
Oj'ster  Bay  he  said  it  was  time  for  all  men 
"who  believe  in  the  elementary  maxims  of 
public  and  private  morality  to  join  in  one 
movement."    This  is  a  good  plank  but  not 
sufficiently  specific.    A  man  njay  be  for  free 
silver,  for  high  protection,  for  9-foot  bed 
sheets — for   almost  anything — and   at  the 
same  time  for  the  "elementary  maxims  of 
public  and  private  morality."    After  read- 
ing the  Chicago  and  Baltimore  platforms  the 
Colonel  was  blessed  with  an  accession  of 
new  ideas,  and  he  struck  a  new  popular 
chord — reduction  of  the  high  cost  of  living 
and  more  money  for  the  toilers.    There's  a 
plank  worth  standing  on,  and  the  Colonel 
is  there  with  both  feet.    Frankly  he  con- 
fesses he  doesn't  know  why  the  cost  of  liv- 
ing is  high.    This  was  the  first  time  in  his 
whole  life  he  made  a  confession  of  ignor- 
ance, and  by  this  sign  we  know  he  is  really 
progressive.     The    Colonel    is  disdaining 
flubdub  and  getting  down  to  brass  tacks. 
At  length  he  has  made  it  clear  why  there  is 
necessity  for  a  third  party.    What  the  plain 
people   really   want   is   more   money  and 
cheaper  grub,  and  neither  of  the  old  parties 
has  promised  to  gratify  them.  Their  neglect 
is  the  Colonel's  opportunity,  and  thus  it  is 
that  the  nation  has  at  once  a  crisis  on  its 
hands  and  the  one  man  to  meet  it  whom 
Providence  in  its  infinite  mercy  always  pro- 
vides in  a  great  emergency.    So  the  issue 
is  clean-cut  and  distinct,  but  will  Medill 
McCormick  and  Munsey  and  Pinchot  be  sat- 
isfied   with    the    new    shibboleth — More 
Money,  Cheaper  Grub ! 


"Stover  of  Yale" 

The  country  is  so  crowded  with  college 
students  and  college  graduates  it  is  no 
wonder  that  "Stover  of  Yale"  is  a  best-seller 
and  has  caused  much  heat  and  provoked 
much  discussion.  "Stover  of  Yale"  is  an  in- 
dictment of  our  universities  in  the  form  of 
that  abominable  thing  called  a  novel  with 
a  purpose.  The  purpose  of  Owen  Johnson, 
the  author  of  "Stover  of  Yale,"  is  to  prove 
that  our  universities  are  hotbeds  of  ignor- 
amuses and  social  climbers,  and  that  they 
rouse  no  intellectual  interests,  and  send 
men  into  the  world  without  opinions  on  any 
subject.  This  Johnson  indictment  is  not 
wholly  new.  It  has  been  frequently  said 
that  the  most  striking  thing  about  an 
American  college  student  is  his  illiteracy. 


But  all  college  students  are  not  illiterate. 
Perhaps  the  bulk  of  them  are,  but  this  is 
probably  because  of  the  American  idea  that 
higher  education  is  not  only  within  the  reach 
but  within  the  capacity  also  of  every  human 
bemg.  The  proverb  that  you  cannot  make 
a  silk  purse  out  of  a  sow's  ear  is  not  taken 
seriously  enough  in  this  country.  Every 
mother's  son  is  believed  to  be  capable  of 
being  inspired  with  aspirations  above  the 
herd  and  of  being  fitted  for  leadership  of  his 
countrymen  in  virtue  and  intelligence.  We 
see  the  effect  of  this  pride  of  parenthood  on 
the  daughters  of  the  land.  All  are  believed 
to  be  musicians  by  temperament  and  in- 
stinct, and  all  are  given  piano  lessons,  with 
what  terrible  and  pathetic  consequences  who 
that  has  heard  the  pounding  of  innumerable 
prodigies  does  not  well  know !  Of  course 
ignoramuses  abound  in  our  universities,  and 
the  really  educated  alumnus  is  so  extremely 
rare  as  to  seem  miraculous.  If  it  were 
otherwise,  considering  the  bulk  of  the  ma- 
terial put  into  the  hoppers,  it  would  not  be 
unreasonable  to  regard  our  college  system 
as  divine.  But  how  about  the  charge  that 
young  men  emerge  from  our  colleges  with- 
out opinions  on  any  subject?  We  have  re- 
ceived the  impression  that  the  spirit  of 
dogmatism  is  rampant  in  our  universities. 
Arrogance  and  intellectual  pride  being  char- 
acteristics of  the  half-baked  philosophers  of 
our  university  faculties  it  is  natural  to  in- 
fer that  the  spirit  of  dogmatism  has  been 
communicated  to  their  disciples.  The  prin- 
cipal and  most  dogmatic  expounders  of  the 
isms  of  the  era  are  college  professors  dis- 
tinguished for  their  opinionativeness  and  for 
their  intolerance  of  views  that  do  not  coin- 
cide with  their  own. 


A  Pretty  Kettle  of  Fish 

The  public  long  suffering  of  high  prices, 
have  dyspepsia  and  food  experts  for  their 
sins.  Sitting  on  the  high  stool  at  our  get- 
it-quick-and-rich  counter,  we  are  like  to 
come  a  cropper  between  experimenting  Yale 
and  experimenting  Stanford.  We,  the  peo- 
ple, fear  to  open  our  mouth  lest  dietetically 
we  put  our  foot  in  it.  Not  minded  to  die 
yet,  we  diet,  ever  with  an  eye  to  our  tum- 
tum.  Says  Stanford  in  effect,  having  tried 
it  out  on  the  rodent:  "Man  does  not  live  by 
bread  alone;  'tis  meat  that  he  should  eat." 
"'Tis  vegetables,"  says  Yale.  Confronted 
with  the  cardinal  facts,  the  records  of  the 
meat-eaters,  does  the  eastern  university  feel 
blue?  Not  a  bit.  "Rats!"  she  screams, 
and  points  the  finger  of  pride  to  the  feats 
of  her  vegetarians,  who  also  ran  and  went 
some.  "Lo  the  endurance  of  the  rice-fed 
Jap !"  "The  Jap  fed  meat,  beri-beri  went 
by  the  board !"  And  so  it  goes.  Earning 
her  living  by  the  sweat  of  her  high  brow,  an- 
other institution  of  learning  will  take  her 
dying  oath  that  the  family  of  Eve  is  frugiv- 
orous,  and  roots  for  fruits,  while  yet  an- 
other lauds  the  peanut,  pure  and  perfect 
food.  The  question,  all-absorbing,  is  not : 
"Do  we  eat  today?  but  May  we?  What 
must  the  great  body  of  mankind  do  to  be 
saved?  To  save  our  soul,  we  cannot  say. 
Doctors  swallowed  whole  disagree  with  us 


and  we,  the  patient,  the  poor  as  Job's  turkey, 
die.  We  are  strongly  minded  to  tell  the 
professors  to  go  to  grass,  as  if  they  wert 
crazy  Nebuchadnezzars  all.  Stomach  them 
we  cannot.  Let  this  alma  mater  say  which 
and  that,  t'other,  we  are  driven  by  hunger 
to  believe  that  the  benign  mother  knows  her 
business.  We  intend  to  intrust  our  life  to 
our  tongue,  to  eat  when  we  are  hungry, 
drink  when  we  are  thirsty,  sleep  when  we 
are  made  tired,  cuss  when  we  are  mad.  We 
are  subtracting,  if  not  cubits  from  our 
statures,  then  from  our  span  of  life,  by  tak- 
ing entirely  too  much  thought  for  the  mor- 
row, what  we  shall  eat,  what  we  shall  drink, 
and  wherewithall  shall  we  be  clothed.  Fast 
as  Hygiene  comes  in  at  the  door  health  goes 
out  at  the  window.  Let's  be  merry  and  not 
too  body-conscious;  else  tomorrow  we  die. 


The  System 

King  George  and  the  Tories  are  reported 
to  be  very  indignant  at  Sir  Sidney  Lee  for 
his  biography  of  King  Edward  VII  which 
recently  made  its  appearance  in  the  second 
supplement  to  volume  I  of  the  "Dictionary 
of  National  Biography."  The  King  is  said 
to  have  pronounced  the  biography  insulting 
and  disrespectful  to  the  monarchy.  The 
author,  it  appears,  has  given  us  too  much 
intimate  detail.  But  from  the  historical 
standpoint  this  is  not  to  be  considered  a  de- 
fect, however  painful  it  may  be  to  the  feel- 
ings of  His  Majesty  to  have  removed  the 
veil  behind  which  may  be  seen  the  manners 
of  his  immediate  ancestors.  From  what  we 
have  read  of  the  biography  we  conceive  it 
will  serve  one  good  purpose — that  of  warn- 
ing parents  against  a  too  rigorous  system- 
atic rearing  of  children.  This  warning  was 
voiced  by  George  Meredith  in  one  of  his 
best  novels.  Meredith's  hero  Richard  Fev- 
erel  was  raised  according  to  system,  and 
singularly  enough  it  appears  that  the  sys- 
tem was  a  duplicate  of  the  one  employed  in 
the  case  of  Albert  Edward,  and  that  the  re- 
sults in  both  cases  were  almost  the  same.  It 
was  the  aim  of  the  little  Prince's  parents 
to  make  him  a  model  of  morality,  of  piety, 
of  deportment,  and  of  intellectual  accom- 
plishment. During  his  childhood  he  re- 
ceived from  the  Queen  long  written  ex- 
hortations on  the  minutest  matters  of  con- 
duct. His  tutors  strove  to  stuff  him  with 
knowledge.  They  excluded  him  from  the 
society  of  children.  And  then  they  com- 
plained that  he  was  wanting  in  enthusiasm 
and  imagination  and  subject  to  fits  of  ill 
temper.  Lord  Granville,  asked  for  advice, 
bluntly  remarked  that  the  boy  ought  to  be 
let  out  of  his  cage.  But  the  advice  was  not 
taken.  He  was  sent  abroad,  but  the  cage 
went  also.  Vigilance  was  never  relaxed. 
Even  when  he  went  to  Oxford  he  was  not 
permitted  to  mix  with  other  students.  Nat- 
urally the  boy  did  not  come  up  to  expecta- 
tions. Perhaps  it  is  to  be  wondered  at  that 
he  was  not  as  badly  dwarfed  of  soul  as  of 
body,  for,  the  system  notwithstanding,  Al- 
bert Edward  became  a  pretty  decent  sort 
of  man.  If  he  had  not  been  a  King  he 
might  have  been  a  success  as  a  merchant  in 
a  country  town. 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


5 


Varied  Types 

LXXXII— JOHN  HOYLE 
By  Theodore  Bonnet 


Failing-  to  find  Charles  Edward  Russell,  sociol- 
ogist, though  I  looked  for  him  in  many  places,  I 
took  as  a  substitute  John  Hoyle,  penologist,  and 
we  talked  of  sociology,  penology  and  kindred 
topics.  I  had  just  been  reading  Charles  Edward 
Russell's  letter  to  Fremont  Older  wherein  the 
somewhat  maudlin  sociologist  inveighs  against 
the  failure  of  civilization  as  evidenced  by  its  im- 
perfections and  complains  that  society  punishes 
criminals  instead  of  devising  some  means  of  pun- 
ishing itself.  According  to  Mr.  Russell,  prisons 
are  "frightful  places"  filled  with  "indescribable 
horrors"  and  with  men  who  are  compelled  to  un- 
dergo torments  "because  of  the  common  fault 
of  all  of  us,  because  we  have  provided  conditions 
under  which  it  is  impossible  for  them  to  do  any- 
thing else  but  break  our  laws,  because  they  have 
been  brought  up  in  our  slums  and  educated  in 
our  streets  and  trained  to  evil  in  our  schools  of 
crime,  and  sent  forth  with  minds  darkened  and 
embittered  with  that  poverty  that  we  insist  upon 
maintaining."  Warden  Hoyle  had  read  this  let- 
ter of  Russell's,  and  when  I  spoke  to  him  about 
it  he  smiled.  Warden  Hoyle  is  a  most  amiable 
man,  bubbling  over  with  good  nature.  It  is  as 
natural  for  Warden  Hoyle  to  smile  as  it  is  for 
Charles  Edward  Russell  to  darken  his  gloomy 
visage  with  frowns.  All  reformers  are  given  to 
frowns,  they  are  all  so  solemn,  so  sour  and  so 
sad.  If  they  were  otherwise  they  would  not  be 
reformers.  Getting  into  the  presence  of  one  of 
them  is  like  plunging  into  a  well  of  woe  and 
extinguishing  utterly  the  lamp  of  hope.  So,  after 
all,  when  I  met  Warden  Hoyle  I  was  glad  I  had 
missed  Charles  Edward  Russell.  Hoyle  is  so 
diflferent.  A  light-hearted  man  is  the  warden, 
with  the  average  human  share  of  imagination  and 
sympathy.  Something  of  a  philosopher,  too,  is 
Hoyle,  not  at  all  averse  to  ideals,  but  holding  that 
they  are  to  be  striven  toward  not  mourned  over. 
When  I  mentioned  the  dolorous  Russell  epistle 
and  asked  the  warden  what  he  thought  of  it,  he 
said  it  seemed  hardly  worth  while  to  make  reply 
to  such  lugubrious  observations.  "It  is  too  bad," 
he  remarked,  "that  such  nonsense  is  taken 
seriously.  As  absurd  as  it  is  it  does  some  harm. 
It  makes  for  unrest  among  prisoners  for  whom 
we  are  trying  to  do  some  good." 

I  found  that  Warden  Hoyle  would  rather  talk 
about  what  is  being  done  toward  improving  our 
prison  system  than  about  the  maunderings  of 
doleful  sociologists.  He  told  me  that  the  new 
cell-house  at  San  Quentin  would  soon  be  finished, 
and  that  there  would  then  be  eight  hundred  more 
individual  cells  in  each  of  which  would  be  run- 
ning water  and  other  luxuries.  When  this  build- 
ing is  finished  there  will  be  more  yard  space,  and 
it  will  then  be  possible  to  segregate  prisoners  and 
grade  them,  and  give  the  good  ones  more  breath- 
ing space,  more  recreation,  more  sunshine.  It  is 
the  purpose  of  the  warden  to  establish  three 
grades  of  prisoners  in  the  first  of  which  men  will 
have  many  privileges  which  it  is  now  impossible 
to  give  them.  By  this  method  there  will  be  great 
inducement  to  good  behaviour. 

"How  about  the  strait-jacket?"  I  asked.  "Mr. 
Rus'^ell  mentions  that  among  the  'horrors'  of 
prison  life.  Is  that  one  of  the  essential  induce- 
ments to  good  behaviour?" 

The  warden  smiled.    "Have  you  ever  seen  a 
man  in  a  strait-jacket?"  he  asked. 

Yes,  I  had  seen  many.  Long  years  ago  when 
I  was  a  police  reporter  I  made  the  acquaintance 
of  the  strait-jacket.    There  were  two  or  tnree 


strait-jackets  in  the  city  emergency  hospital. 
They  were  used  not  as  instruments  of  torture, 
but  for  the  protection  of  delirious  patients  against 
themselves. 

"Well,"  said  the  warden,  "a  strait-jacket  may 
be  made  very  uncomfortable.  It  all  depends  on 
how  tight  it  is  strapped  on.  To  strap  it  on  in  a 
way  to  inflict  physical  pain  would  be  a  mighty 
cruel  thing  to  do.  But  I  am  quite  sure  there  is 
nothing  like  barbarism  in  San  Quentin.  A  strait- 
jacket  isn't  conclusive  of  torture.  As  a  mat- 
ter of  fact  its  principal  purpose  is  to  inspire  fear, 
and  when  you  have  nineteen  hundred  men  to  taT<e 
care  of,  the  most  of  whom  are  far  from  gentle, 
many  of  whom  are  inclined  to  be  disagreeable, 
you  will  generally  find  a  few  who  have  to  be  ruled 
by  fear." 

I  asked  the  warden  if  it  was  hard  to  maintain 
discipline  at  San  Quentin.  He  said  it  was  not, 
that  the  great  majority  of  prisoners  were  disposed 
to  obey  the  rules.  He  characterized  as  nonsense 
the  idea  industriously  disseminated  by  reformers 
that  the  average  man  leaves  hope  behind  when 
he  enters  the  prison  walls.  The  prospect  of 
parole,  he  told  me,  gladdened  the  heart  of  the 
average  convict.  He  is  very  enthusiastic  for  the 
parole  system,  though,  as  he  says,  it  causes  un- 
rest inasmuch  as  many  of  the  petitions  for  parole 
are  denied  owing  in  some  cases  to  the  failure  of 
the  petitioners  to  get  the  required  signatures.  He 
believes,  however,  that  conditions  will  go  on  im- 
proving, and  that  we  are  rapidly  approaching  a 
solution  of  one  of  the  most  perplexing  of  all  the 
problems  that  civilization  has  to  deal  with.  Jolm 
Hoyle  is  an  optimist  of  the  first  order  and  also 
a  man  of  tender  sensibilities  who  while  scoffing  at 
the  Utopian  absurdities  of  the  sentimental  sociol- 
ogists looks  forward  to  a  very  satisfactory  ad- 
justment of  the  compromise  between  the  ideal  and 
the  practicable. 

"As  a  matter  of  fact,"  said  Hoyle,  ""the  whole 
aim  of  our  prison  authorities  is  to  make  genuine 
reformatories  out  of  our  penitentiaries,  and  that 
is  what  they  will  eventually  be.  The  State  has 
purchased  land  near  Napa  where  there  is  to  be 
built  a  reformatory  for  prisoners  between  six- 
teen and  thirty  years  of  age.  When  we  get  that 
great  strides  will  be  made  toward  the  ideals  of 
the  reformers.  We  shall  then  use  San  Quentin 
for  prisoners  of  the  second  class  and  Folsom  for 
incorrigibles.  But  even  now  our  prison  system 
is  not  so  bad  as  sentimental  critics  would  have  the 
people  believe.  I  see  that  Mr.  Russell  says  that 
men  become  criminals  because  we  have  provided 
conditions  which  make  it  impossible  for  men  to 
do  anything  else  but  break  the  laws.  If  this 
were  so  our  parole  system  would  be  futile.  If  all 
that  he  says  were  true  it  would  be  a  very  fine 
tribute  to  our  prisons.  Unconsciously  he  has 
praised  the  prisons.  He  says  that  criminals  are 
men  who  have  been  brought  up  in  the  slums  and 
sent  forth  with  minds  darkened  and  embittered. 
If  that  be  so  then  the  penitentiary  system  must 
tend  to  enlighten  their  minds  and  soften  their 
feelings,  for  when  we  let  them  out  on  parole 
very  few  come  back.  The  parole  system  is  a 
great  success.  Not  more  than  fifteen  per  cent 
violate  their  parole,  and  the  violation  is  usually 
by  leaving  the  State.  Only  two  per  cent  of 
paroled  criminals  are  again  arrested  for  felonies. 
This  being  so  how  can  it  be  said  that  conditions 
make  it  impossible  for  men  to  do  anything  else 
but  break  the  laws?    If  ex-convicts  can  get  along 


without  breaking  the  laws,  I  should  think  that 
other  men  could  get  along  too." 

And  Warden  Hoyle  smiled  as  he  made  his 
points. 

I  asked  him  if  many  reformers  visited  San 
Quentin.  He  said  that  women  came  there  oc- 
casionally who  took  an  interest  in  prisoners,  and 
that  they  were  quite  sincere  and  desirous  of  do- 
ing good.  While  on  this  subject  the  warden  told 
me  a  story  by  way  of  answer  to  a  question  re- 
garding the  personality  of  a  feminine  reformer 
of  the  sloppy  sentimental  variety  and  Charles 
Edward  Russell  school  of  sociology. 

"You  want  to  know  what  she  is  like?"  he  asked 

I  did. 

"Well  one  day  she  was  in  a  room  adjoining  my 
office  talking  to  another  woman.  She  remarked 
that  it  would  be  dangerous  for  a  woman  to  go 
unprotected  through  the  prison.  A  convict  work- 
ing in  the  office  heard  her,  and  he  muttered 
audibly,  'She  could  go  through  in  her  night-shirt 
without  the  slightest  danger.'" 

From  which  it  is  to  be  inferred  that  even 
among  the  "crushed,  tormented  and  tortured  souls" 
behind  prison  walls  is  occasionally  to  be  found 
a  man  with  a  very  lively  wit. 

The  outbreak  that  occurred  in  San  Quentin 
about  two  months  ago,  I  learned  from  Warden 
Hoyle,  is  still  the  subject  of  investigation,  and 
some  important  information  has  been  obtained 
regarding  the  inspiration  of  it,  which,  in  the 
course  of  time  will  become  public  property.  But 
on  this  subject  the  warden  is  somewhat  reticent. 
All  that  he  will  say  is  that  it  is  now  known  posi- 
tively that  there  were  twenty-five  conspirators 
who  started  the  revolt.  All  of  them  are  pretty 
tough  characters.  Thirteen  of  them  are  serving 
time  for  robbery,  three  for  grand  larceny,  eight 
for  burglary  and  one  for  murder  and  all  were  in 
the  jute  mill;  not  one — and  this  the  warden  re- 
gards as  significant — was  employed  in  any  of  the 
factories  which  supply  the  institutions  of  the 
State  with  shoes,  clothes  and  furniture.  Immedi- 
ately after  the  outbreak  an  effort  was  made  to  stir 
up  sympathy  for  the  prisoners.  It  was  said  they 
had  many  grievances,  one  of  which  was  that  their 
food  was  unfit  to  eat.  It  is  now  known  that  no 
such  grievance  existed.  The  purpose  of  the  out- 
break was  to  occasion  criticism  of  the  prison  au- 
thorities. "In  time,"  said  Hoyle,  "we  shall  get 
to  the  bottom  of  it." 

1  came  away  from  my  interview  with  Warden 
Hoyle  with  the  very  pleasant  impression  that  he 
is  a  public  official  with  enthusiasm  for  his  duties 
who  realizes  that  though  perfection  is  unattain- 
able we  ought  to  keep  an  eye  on  the  compass 
which  tells  us  where  it  lies. 


Going  Abroad? 

To  the  Orient? 

To  the  Mediterranean? 

To  the  West  Indies? 

To  South  America? 

To  Egypt  and  the  Nile? 

To  London,  Paris,  Berlin  and  Italy? 

Around  the  World? 

Or  a  flight  in  a  Zeppelin  Airship? 

Gel  prosrams  of  our  Famous  Pleasure  Cruises 
Handsomely  illustated  pamphlets  gratis. 

HAMBURG -AMERICAN  LINE 

160  POWELL  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


Correspondence 


Watterson  on  Wilson 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  I  see  that  the  old  war 
horse  of  Democracy,  Marse  Watterson,  would 
rather  cling  to  the  "devil"  (Wilson)  than  support 
cither  President  Taft  or  Roosevelt.  What  the 
Colonel  means  is  that  he  cannot  afford  to  make 
his  paper  disloyal  to  his  party  no  matter  how 
evil  the  hands  into  which  it  is  fallen.  The 
Colonel's  courage  is  not  of  the  moral  variety.  I 
have  before  me  a  clipping  from  the  Courier- 
Journal  of  a  week  before  the  opening  of  the 
Baltimore  convention.  This  is  what  he  says  of 
the  man  he  is  now  constrained  to  support: 

"Drawn  into  his  support  by  the  casual  incident 
of  a  week  end  at  a  country  house,  he  was  cap- 
tivated by  the  outer  aspects  of  the  then  head 
of  Princetmi;  a  man  of  leading  and  learning.  To 
find  in  such  a  place  and  such  a  person  a  Democra- 
tic nominee  for  President  looked  like  finding  a 
fortune  in  tlie  lining  of  an  easy  chair.  Of  a  sud- 
den there  came  a  revelation  of  personality,  as 
by  flashlight,  making  it  plain  that  when  the  fairy 
godmother  bent  over  the  cradle  of  the  little 
Woodrow  Wilson  to  give  him  so  many  blessings, 
she  withheld  the  virtue  of  fidelity,  without  which 
the  rest,  however  shining,  are  tainted.  May  we 
not.  in  passing,  remark  that  the  occasion  of 
difference  given  out  by  the  Wilson  Press  Agency, 
silently  ac(iuiesced  in  by  Governor  Wilson  and 


since  exploited  by  the  Wilson  promoters  from 
one  end  of  the  land  to  the  other — Thomas  F. 
Ryan's  money — had  no  existence  whatever,  and 
was  not  remotely  a  cause,  or  in  issue.  No  hon- 
orable man  can  learn  the  facts  and  inspect  the 
proof  which  the  editor  of  the  Courier-Journal 
liolds  and  has  repeatedly  offered  to  produce  un- 
der proper  restriction  as  to  personal  rights  and 
party  interest,  and  remain  of  the  opini<m  that 
the  Governor  of  New  Jersey  is  either  a  trust- 
worthy or  a  safe  man  to  be  invested  with 
Democratic  leadership  and  the  Presidential  office. 
Unfortunately,  good  breeding  and  integrity  are 
not  convertible  terms,  while  austerity  and  virtue 
are  often  wide  apart." 

Marse  Henry,  it  is  evident,  will  make  a  gallant 
figlit  for  the  professor,  his  heart  being  in  it. 

Yours  truly, 

— R.  L.  B. 


Women  and  the  Election 

h'ditor  Town  Talk.  Dear  Sir:  One  of  the  un- 
known factors  in  the  next  Presidential  election  is 
the  women's  vote.  A  good  many  things  may 
happen  between  now  and  November,  but  I  doubt 
if  the  ac(iuisition  of  common  sense  by  the 
suffragettes  is  apt  to  be  one  of  them.  Some  of 
these  newly  enfranchised  voters  actually  believe 
that  their  l^eloved  "Teddy"  is  going  to  sit  up 


in  his  Presidential  high  chair  and  dictate  to  the 
corner  grocery  man  and  the  butcher  across  the 
street  the  daily  price  of  beefsteak  and  potatoes. 
They  have  got  the  word  "Trust"  wedged  cross- 
wise into  their  heads  and  there  is  no  dislodging 
it.  They  don't  know  what  a  trust  is.  don't  want 
to  know.  It  is  some  vague  thing  which  has 
made  high  prices  and  Roosevelt  will  force  them 
to  let  go  if  he  has  to  call  the  managers  up  be- 
fore his  footstool  and  rap  their  knuckles  with  his 
big  stick.  You  would  have  a  good  time  trying 
to  make  a  woman  understand  that  ten  hours' 
pay  for  eight  hours'  work  alone  has  added  one- 
fourth  to  the  time  cost  of  every  manufactured  ar- 
ticle and  that  the  salaries  of  all  the  commission- 
ers and  inspectors  eventually  come  out  of  their 
pockets.  Every  fool  woman  is  in  favor  of  every 
fool  bonding  project  for  parks,  play  grounds  and 
"free"  improvements.  "The  Government"  will 
pay,  and  the  Government  is  as  vague  an  idea  as 
the  trusts.  Those  who  own  property  will  weep 
and  wail  over  the  high  taxes  and  be  ready  to  em- 
brace any  reform  that  promises  a  reduction,  but 
the  last  idea  to  enter  their  heads  will  be  that  they 
themselves  have  raised  first  the  tax  to  establish 
these  affairs  and  next  the  perpetual  tax  for  main- 
tenance and  supervision. 

Respectfully  j'ours, 

— S.  C. 


Siftings  from  Many  Sources 

Being  a  Brief  Chronicle  of  Signifi  cant  Events  the  Wide  World  Over 


Memorial  to  Chinese  Revolutionists 

Some  time  ago  it  was  pmposeil  to  build  a 
memorial  in  the  form  of  a  temple  in  Canton  to 
those  who  lost  their  lives  in  connection  with  the 
revolution  in  China.  Now  a  large  meeting  of  in- 
fluential people  has  been  called  and  it  has  been 
decided  to  Iniild  near  the  five  storied  pagoda  in 
a  garden  a  temple  to  be  called  "Chung  Lit  Chi" 
to  commemorate  those  who  were  killed,  both  in 
the  unsuccessful  revolt  last  .April  and  in  the  suc- 
cessful rising  in  November. 


Tabloid  Drama 

Tile  influence  of  vaudeville  is  now  being  felt 
in  tlie  theatre  devoted  to  the  drama,  as  evidenced 
from  the  fact  that  Charles  Frohman  is  to  make 
an  evening's  entertainment  consist  of  three  short 
plays  by  Shaw,  Barrie  and  Pinero.  The  three 
authors  held  a  meeting  last  week  and  agreed 
upon  the  length  of  tlieir  separate  works,  then 
adjourned  to  meet  again  at  the  first  rehearsal. 
The  first  pcrfurmance  of  the  plays  will  be  gi\en 
at  the  Duke  of  York's  Theatre  near  the  end  of 
September.  There  will  be  a  separate  cast  for 
each  play  selected  by  the  author.  This  theatrical 
stunt  will  be  repeated  in  New  York  about  the 
time  of  the  production  here  witli  three  other 
separate  casts. 


Morgan  and  the  Kaiser 

J.  Pierpont  Morgan  was  never  so  feted  by  the 
Kaiser  as  during  the  week  of  the  yacht  races  at 
Kiel.  Mr.  Morgan  was  the  almost  constant 
companion  of  the  Kaiser,  who  seemed  to  take 


By  Robert  McTavish 

the  greatest  pleasure  in  c(jnversing  with  him.  He 
was  the  Kaiser's  guest  at  numerous  luncheons  and 
dinners  and  usually  sat  next  to  or  close  to  the 
Emperor.  He  was  aboiird  the  Kaiser's  yacht 
Meteor  when  slie  won  the  first  race.  None  of 
tlie  military  or  naval  officers  or  tiie  titled  Eng- 
lish or  German  personages  were  accorded  so 
nuich  .-ittention  by  the  Kaiser  as  was  Mr.  Morgan. 

The  Menace  of  Cocaine  in  Paris 

Coc.'iine  is  destroying  Paris  society,  according 
to  an  article  by  .Alfred  Edwards,  founder  of  the 
Matin  newspaper.  The  drug,  he  says,  is  now  in 
full  vogue,  especially  among  the  gilded  youth  of 
the  capital,  on  whom  it  is  working  frightful 
h;iv()C.  mentally,  morally  and  physically.  The 
writer  says  he  is  induced  to  give  the  cry  of  alarm 
in  consequence  of  statements  of  a  number  of 
medical  friends,  who  see  day  by  day  a  proces- 
sion of  victims  more  or  less  irremediably  injured. 
Cocaine,  he  points  out,  from  being  of  the  greatest 
benefit  to  humanity  in  minor  surgical  operations, 
has  now  become  one  of  its  most  frightful  scour- 
ges, in  Paris  at  all  events.  Tlie  facility  with 
which  it  can  be  taken  has  caused  it  altogether  to 
displace  morphine  as  a  means  of  obtaining 
".Asiatic  dreams."  Young  people  of  both  sexes, 
says  Mr.  Edwards,  hoping  to  install  a  minor  par- 
adise of  Mahomet  at  home,  take  cocaine  in  larger 
and  larger  quantities,  without  any  knowledge  of 
its  effects  on  the  system.  The  result  is  that  fatal 
accidents  are  of  daily  occurrence,  while  if  those 
who  become  its  slaves  are  not  killed  at  once,  they 
in  many  cases  become  utterly  demoralized  or 
brutalized. 


Art  Is  Soaring 

There  have  been  remarkable  happenings  in  tiie 
art  world  in  the  last  year.  The  rise  in  values  as 
shown  by  the  Doucet  and  Corcano  sales  in  Paris 
has  been  tremendous.  What  concerns  people  in 
the  United  States  more  closely  than  the  high 
prices  is  the  fact  that  Americans  have  been 
among  the  chief  purchasers  at  both  the  public 
auctions  and  the  private  sales.  More  and  more 
of  the  art  treasures  of  the  Old  World  are  com- 
ing to  the  New.  The  drain  is  so  great  as  to 
awaken  alarm  in  England,  They  complain  there 
that  the  art  accumulations  of  centuries  in  great 
houses  are  being  shipped  to  .America.  States- 
men like  Mr.  Asquith  and  Mr.  Balfour  have  dis- 
cussed the  danger  and  the  remedy.  The  custom 
house  figures  tell  the  tale.  Not  England  alone 
but  all  Europe  is  supplying  masterpieces  to 
American  collectors.  Within  the  last  year  the 
valuation  of  works  of  art  received  in  the  port 
of  New  York  free  of  duty  is  estimated  at 
$,32.(X)0.(X)0. 


INVITATIONS  MONOGRAMS  CRESTS 

VISITING  CARD  PLATES  ENGRAVED 


ROBERTSON 


UNION  SQUARE  SAN  FRANCISCO 


July  13,  1912  TOWN  TALK 

Perspective  Impressions 


The  husband  who  allows  his  suffragette  wife 
to  register  for  him  at  a  hotel,  designating  him 
merely  as  "and  husband,"  has  just  the  sort  of 
wife  he  deserves. 


A  lot  of  Progressive  ardor  is  going  to  cool  be- 
tween now  and  the  fifth  of  August  when  the 
"bull  moose"  convention  is  scheduled  to  begin  in 
Chicago. 


Mr.  Hearst  will  support  the  nominee  of  the 
Baltimore  convention — on  a  pruning  hook. 


Women  in  Paris  arc  now  wearing  suspenders 
just  like  men  only  that  they  are  attached  to  the 
skirt.    The  other  garment  is  worn  as  of  old. 


One  of  the  visiting  clubwomen  went  slumming 
and  studied  the  "sensuous  abandon"  of  the  Bar- 
bary  Coast.  If  there  is  any  "sensuous  abandon" 
on  the  Coast  hardened  San  Franciscans  have  failed 
to  discover  it. 


"Soldiers  Rescue  Steers  Imprisoned  for  Years; 
Large  Herd  Grows  From  Few  Animals." — Ex- 
aminer headline.  This  remarkable  freak  of  nature 
is  respectfully  referred  to  Professor  Loeb  for  the 
light  that  it  may  throw  on  the  secret  of  life. 


On  his  own  initiative  Bill  Kent  has  recalled 
his  determination  not  to  run  again.  Perhaps  the 
result  of  the  popular  referendum  in  November 
will  make  him  sorry  he  changed  his  mind. 


Would  it  be  impertinent  to  ask  Bill  Kent  how 
much  he  intends  to  pay  for  votes  on  the  hoof  in 
the  next  campaign? 


Chester  Rowell  has  been  harking  back  to  the 
iniquity  of  the  Santa  Cruz  Convention.  No  small 
part  of  it  was  Chester. 


"Now  what  are  the  American  people  going  to 
do  about  it?" — Fresno  Republican.  Why  not 
ask  the  Colonel.  He  keeps  his  ear  at  the  public 
mouth. 


So  strong  is  the  demand  among  the  virtuous 
Progressive  newspapers  for  calumnies  against  the 
President  that  it  requires  great  courage  for  a 
Cabinet  officer  to  discharge  a  janitor. 


Boum-Boum 


The  cliild,  deadly  pale,  was  lying  stretched  out 
in  his  little  white  bed,  and  his  eyes,  grown  big 
from  the  fever,  gazed  fixedly  in  front  of  him, 
with  that  strange  look  of  dying  people,  who  seem 
already  to  see  things  invisible  to  others. 

At  the  head  of  the  bed  the  mother,  biting  her 
fingers  to  keep  from  crying,  anxiously  followed 
the  progress  of  the  disease  upon  the  thin  face  of 
the  poor  little  creature.  The  father,  a  good  work- 
man, forced  back  into  his  red  eyes  the  tears 
which  burnt  his  eyelids. 

The  sun  rose,  clear  and  sweet,  on  a  beautiful 
June  morning,  and  the  early  light  filled  the  room 
on  the  Rue  des  Abbesses,  where  little  Francois, 
the  child  of  Jacques  and  Marie  Legrand,  lay 
dying.  He  was  seven  years  old,  and  only  three 
weeks  ago  he  had  been  fair  and  rosy,  gay  as  a 
sparrow.  But  a  fever  had  attacked  him.  One 
evening  he  came  home  from  school  with  an 
aching  head  and  hands  as  hot  as  fire.  And  while 
he  was  there  in  bed  he  sometimes  said  in  his 
delirium,  as  he  looked  at  liis  carefully  polished 
shoes,  which  his  mother  had  placed  in  a  corner: 

"You  can  throw  away  little  Francois's  shoes, 
for  he  will  never  wear  them  again.  Little  Fran- 
cois will  never  go  back  to  school — never,  never!" 

Then  the  father  said,  "Be  quiet!"  and  the 
mother  buried  her  blond  head  in  the  pillow  so 
that  little  Francois  should  not  know  that  she 
was  crying. 

That  night  the  child  had  not  been  delirious, 
but  for  two  days  past  he  had  made  the  doctor 
very  anxious  by  a  sort  of  strange  prostration, 
which  seemed  like  a  giving-up  of  everything,  as 
if,  at  seven  years  old,  the  sick  child  had  already 
grown  weary  of  life.  He  was  tired,  silent,  sor- 
rowful, turning  his  head  upon  the  pillow,  not 
wanting  to  take  anything,  without  a  smile  upon 
his  poor  shrivelled  lips,  and  his  haggard  eyes 
still  searching,  seeing  one  knew  not  what,  very 
far  off.  When  they  wanted  him  to  take  his 
medicine  or  some  soup  he  utterly  refused. 

"Do  you  want  something,  Francois?" 

"No,  I  want  nothing!" 

The  doctor  said:  "He  must  be  roused  out  of 
this  state.  His  torpor  alarms  me.  You  are  his 
father  and  mother,  and  you  know  your  own  child 
perfectly.  You  must  find  something  to  bring 
back  the  life  to  this  little  body,  and  to  recall  to 
earth  this  spirit  which  is  hovering  in  the  clouds.' 
And  he  left  them. 


By  Jules  Claretie 

They  must  find  something!  Yes.  surely  the 
good  people  knew  all  about  their  little  Francois. 
They  knew  how  he  enjoyed  plundering  the  hedges 
on  Sunday,  and  coming  back  to  Paris  loaded  with 
hawthorn  blossoms,  and  seated  upon  his  father's 
shoulders.  They  knew  how  he  loved  to  go  to 
the  Champs  Elysee  to  see  Punch  and  Judy. 

Jacques  Legrand  had  bought  paper  toys  for  the 
little  one,  gilded  soldiers,  queer  Chinese  figures. 
Now  he  cut  them  out,  put  them  on  the  child's 
bed,  made  them  dance  before  his  eyes,  and  tried 
to  make  him  laugh,  though  his  own  heart  was 
full  of  grief. 

"See,  Francois!  That  is  a  broken  bridge,  and 
there  is  a  general!  Don't  you  remember?  You 
saw  a  general  one  day  in  the  Bois  de  Boulogne. 
If  you  take  your  medicine  I'll  buy  you  a  bigger 
line,  with  a  cloth  uniform  and  gold  epaulets. 
Tell  me,  do  you  want  the  general?" 

"No!"  the  child  answered,  in  his  dull,  fever- 
ish voice. 

"Do  you  want  a  pistol,  some  marbles,  a  cross- 
bow ?" 

"No,"  repeated  the  little  voice,  clear  and  al- 
most cruel.  And  to  all  that  they  said  to  him, 
to  all  their  offers  of  balloons  and  jumping-jacks, 
there  came  the  same  monotonous  answer,  "No, 
no,  no!"  while  the  unhappy  parents  looked  at 
each  other  despairingly. 

"But  what  do  you  really  want,  my  little  Fran- 
cois?" his  mother  asked.  "Let  us  see,  there 
surely  must  be  something  which  you  would  like 
to  have.    Tell  me,  tell  your  own  mamma!" 

She  laid  her  cheek  upon  the  sick  boy's  pillow, 
and  whispered  this  into  his  ear  as  though  it  were 
a  secret. 

Then  the  child,  in  a  strange  tone,  sitting  up  in 
bed,  and  stretching  out  his  eager  hand  toward 
something  invisible,  answered  all  at  once  in  a 
voice  which  was  earnest,  beseeching,  imperative: 

"I  want  Boum-boum!" 

"Boum-boum !" 

Poor  Marie  turned  her  frightened  face  toward 
her  husband.  What  was  the  little  boy  saying? 
Was  this  another  attack  of  delirium? 

Boum-boum ! 

She  did  not  know  what  he  meant,  and  she  was 
frightened  by  these  strange  words  wliich  the 
cliild  kept  repeating,  as  if,  not  having  dared  until 
then  to  give  any  expression  to  his  dream,  he 


"lung  to  it  with  an  obstinacy  notiiing  could 
change. 

"Yes,  Boum-boum!  Bouni-bouni !  I  want 
Boum-boum !" 

The  mother  seized  her  husband's  hand,  and 
said,  "Oh.  Jacques,  what  does  lie  mean?  He  has 
Irst  his  mind!" 

But  the  father's  rough  face  had  an  expression 
which  was  almost  happy,  although  bewildered; 
the  smile  of  a  condemned  man  who  has  caught  a 
glimpse  of  the  possibility  of  freedom. 

Boum-boum!  How  well  he  remembered  the 
Easter  Monday  when  he  had  taken  Francois  to 
the  matinee  at  the  circus.  He  still  seemed  to 
hear  the  boy's  shouts  of  delight,  his  bursts  of 
laughter  when  the  clown,  all  covered  with  gold 
'pangles,  and  wearing  a  glittering  butterfly  on  the 
l  ack  of  liis  costume,  frisked  across  the  ring, 
tripped  up  a  rider,  stood  upon  his  head  in  the 
sruid,  or  tlirew  the  felt  hats  high  up  in  the  air, 
skillfully  catching  them  on  his  head,  where  they 
formed  a  pyramid.  And  at  every  trick,  at  every 
joke,  his  broad  mouth  uttered  the  same  cry,  like 
a  merry  refrain,  repeated  the  same  word: 

"Boum-boum !" 

And  whenever  he  appeared  the  whole  audience 
cried  Bravo!  and  the  little  boy  laughed  joyfully. 
It  was  this  Boum-boum,  the  great  clown,  whom 
Francois  wanted  to  see,  and  whom  he  could  not 
see,  because  he  lay  there,  without  any  strength, 
on  his  white  bed. 

That  evening  Jacques  Legrand  brought  the 
child   a   jointed   clown,   covered    with  spangles, 


(Continued  on  Page  21.) 


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Gen'l  Pacific  Coast  Agent         Near  St.  Francis  Hold  and  Geary  Si. 

Telephones:  Kearny  4794  and  Home  C  3725 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


Poems  About  San  Francisco 

(Bret  Harte  loved  Lone  Mountain,  perhaps  a  bit  more  than  he  loved  the  other  distinctive  elements  that  went 
to  make  up  the  San  Francisco  he  knew.  For  Bret  Harte  was  given  to  the  moralizing  vein,  and  the  hill  which 
sheltered  the  city's  dead  made  a  strong  pull  upon  his  somewhat  melancholy  imagination.  The  cemeteries  of  Lone 
Mountain  he  celebrated  in  a  poem  which  has  already  been  given  in  this  scries.  In  "The  Two  Ships"  he  is  found 
standing  upon  the  hill  straining  his  eyes  to  pierce  the  mystery  of  the  "ultimate  sea."  As  usual  in  such  moments 
Harte's  thoughts  turn  to  religion,  and  he  interprets  the  scene  which  he  surveys  in  terms  of  religious  hope.) 

XLVIII— THE  TWO  SHIPS 
By  Brete  Harte 


As  I  stand  by  the  cross  on  the  lone  mountain's  crest. 

Looking  over  the  ultimate  sea, 
In  the  gloom  of  the  mountain  a  ship  lies  at  rest, 

And  one  sails  away  from  the  lee: 
One  spreads  its  white  wings  on  a  far-reaching  track, 

With  pennant  and  sheet  flowing  free; 
One  hides  in  the  shadow  with  sails  laid  aback, — 

The  ship  tliat  is  waiting  for  me! 


But  lo,  in  the  distance  the  clouds  break  away! 

The  Gate's  glowing  portals  I  see; 
And  I  hear  from  the  outgoing  ship  in  the  bay 

The  song  of  the  sailors  in  glee: 
So  I  think  of  the  luminous  footprints  that  bore 

The  comfort  o'er  dark  Galilee, 
And  wait  for  the  signal  to  go  to  the  shore. 

To  the  ship  that  is  waiting  for  me. 


Divided  Progressives 

It  is  asking  too  much  of  Progressives  to  stick 
together  in  this  campaign  with  two  such  charm- 
ers as  the  Colonel  and  the  professor  ravishing 
the  susceptibles  with  their  blandishments  at  one 
and  the  same  time.  See  what  has  already  hap- 
pened in  California.  Curtis  Lindley,  a  repre- 
sentative of  the  Johnson  machine,  was  Johnny- 
on-the-spot  with  a  telegram  of  felicitation  to  Wil- 
son as  soon  as  the  nomination  was  made.  Now 
Lindley  by  all  the  circumstances  of  the  case 
ought  to  be  for  Roosevelt.  I  cannot  speak  au- 
thoritatively as  to  Lindley's  politics,  but  assuredly 
his  recent  activities  have  compelled  the  infer- 
ence that  his  leanings  were  toward  the  Republi- 
can party.  It  was  not  so  long  ago  that  the 
Johnson  machine  was  thought  to  be  grooming 
Lindley  for  United  States  Senator.  But  here  he 
is  for  Wilson,  riding  on  the  band-wagon  cheek 
by  jowl  with  Rudolph  Spreckels  than  whom  there 
is  not  a  more  bitter  enemy  of  the  current  Sac- 
ramento dispensation  in  all  the  State.  And 
where,  Oh,  where  in  this  great  crisis  is  Senator 
Works,  the  sweetest  flower  that  ever  grew  in  the 
Progressive  garden?  Is  Senator  Works  in 
syinpathy  with  Governor  Johnson's  pet  scheme? 
Not  by  a  jugful.  Works  is  off  the  reservation, 
tripping  the  light  fantastic  ghost  dance,  and 
making  horrible  faces  at  everybody.  He  will 
probably  be  for  Debs. 


Getting  Back  to  Camp 

Notwithstanding  the  dithyrambic  protestations 
of  the  Colonel  the  real  danger  at  this  time  is 
the  danger  of  his  not  running.  California  is 
not  the  only  State  where  defections  are  occurring. 
Some  of  the  hoarsest  of  the  Chicago  shouters 
have  taken  the  back  trail.  The  dailies  have  re- 
ported only  the  capital  losses  and  not  all  of  them. 
There's  Ormsby  McHarg.  for  instance.    I  haven't 


On  July  1,  1912 
We  will  move  our  offices  to 
410  MONTGOMERY  ST.         San  Francisco 

Our  Facilities  for  Handling 
INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 

Will  be  Considerably  Increased 


Established  1858 

SUTRO  &  COMPANY 


Telephone 
Sutter  3434 


Private  Exchange 
Connecting  All  Depts. 


The  Spectator 

seen  anything  about  his  change  of  heart  in  the 
despatches.  Ormsby  is  back  with  the  G.  O.  P. 
Boss  Flinn  is  still  true  to  Poll  but  the  Flinn 
machine  like  Johnson's  is  disintegrating.  Flinn's 
county  chairman.  Mayor  Magee,  I-'linn's  partner, 
David  B.  Johns,  S.  C.  Jamison,  the  coroner, 
William  H.  Coleman,  the  county  clerk  and  Con- 
gressmen Barchficld  and  Porter — all  have  swung 
into  line  for  the  Republican  nominee.  To  make 
matters  worse  the  "Thou  Shalt  not  Steal" 
slogan  is  losing  its  force.  President  William 
Murray  Butler  of  Columbia  University,  a  gen- 
tleman in  whom  even  "Faithful  Friend"  Ben 
Wheeler  has  confidence,  has  been  spreading  the 
light  in  the  Eastern  press,  and  he  says  there  was 
no  stealing  in  Chicago.  Nay,  he  goes  so  far  as 
to  say  that  the  contest  instituted  by  Editor  Hogue 
of  the  Post  was  the  cleanest-cut  of  all,  and  that 
there  was  nothing  more  clear  than  that  the  John- 
son delegates  of  the  Fourth  district  were  not  en- 
titled to  seats  in  the  convention.  This  assertion 
of  course  entitles  William  Murray  Butler  to  mem- 
bership in  the  Ananias  Club. 


Hearing  from  Home 

"They  have  heard  a  great  deal  from  home  in 
this  convention,"  said  William  J.  Bryan  in  Balti- 
more. "They  have  been  hearing  a  great  deal 
from  home  in  that  convention,"  said  Woodrow 
Wilson  at  Sea  Girt.  The  peerless  one  of  the 
sweating  chin  and  the  New  Jersey  pedagogue 
spoke  with  an  exultation  that  could  not  be  con- 
cealed. Not  that  they  wanted  to  conceal  it;  for 
they  are  wont  to  lift  up  their  voices  in  loud- 
mouthed exultation  whenever  they  speak  of  the 
dear  pee-pul.  But  with  a  bit  more  of  finesse  they 
might  have  concealed  the  wheels  of  their  political 
machinery.  There  was  an  overplus  of  team  work 
in  the  remark.  Of  course  the  Bourbons  at  Balti- 
more heard  from  their  unterrified  brethren  at 
home!  It's  as  plain  as  the  nose  on  Bill  Bryan's 
classic  face  that  the  delegates  heard  from  home 
because  Bryan  and  Wilson  inspired  the  stayers- 
at-home  to  bombard  the  delegates  with  messages 
.\11  the  delegations  which  stood  stubbornly  for 
Clark  ballot  after  ballot  were  inundated  with 
billows  of  yellow  paper.  Wire  after  wire  was 
tired  at  them  and  every  wire  was  to  the  same 
effect.  The  folks  at  home  expected  them  to  do 
their  duty  by  breaking  to  Wilson.  There  can  be 
no  doubt  that  these  multitudinous  messages  had 
their  share  in  bringing  about  the  final  result. 
The  men  who  received  them  were  in  a  highly 


nervous  state,  not  prepared  to  withstand  the 
urgings  of  their  party  leaders  at  home.  But  if 
they  had  known  that  these  messages  were  not 
spontaneous  expressions  of  widespread  sentiment, 
but  paper  bullets  molded  by  Bryan  and  Wilson 
for  the  stayers-at-home  to  fire,  would  they  have 
been  so  almightily  impressed  with  them?  I  am 
inclined  to  answer  "no." 


Bombardier  Phelan 

Not  all  these  messages  from  home  were  equally 
successful.  Take  those  which  came  from  Cali- 
fornia for  instance.  They  were  signed  with  the 
name  of  James  D.  Phelan.  A  most  energetic 
bombardier  was  Phelan  who  recked  not  of  tel- 
egraph tolls  when  it  became  a  question  of  sug- 
gcstionizing  the  California  delegation  in  favor  of 
his  dear  friend  Woodrow.  .Across  the  continent 
from  San  Francisco  to  Baltimore  flashed  mes- 
sage after  message  wherein  he  pleaded,  exhorted, 
argued  and  demanded  on  behalf  of  the  Cali- 
fornian  Democracy  that  the  men  who  had  been 
instructed  for  Clark  forget  their  instructions  and 
give  their  twenty-six  votes  to  Wilson.  But  the 
pleadings,  the  exhortations,  the  arguments  and 
the  demands  of  Bombardier  Phelan  fell  on  stony 
ground.  The  men  who  received  them  were  a  bit 
amazed,  mayhap  to  some  extent  indignant.  Why 
should  Bf)mbardicr  Phelan  train  his  mortar  on 
them?  Had  not  the  Wilson  ticket  headed  by 
Phelan  been  beaten  five  to  one  in  the  primary 
election?  Did  he  mean  to  tell  them  that  the 
Democrats  of  California  had  suflFered  an  over- 
whelming change  of  mind  and  heart?  They  were 
sceptical.  They  doubted  the  genuineness  of  these 
instructions  voiced  for  the  dear  pee-pul  by  the 
enthusiastic  bombardier.  They  read  the  messages, 
laughed  at  them  and  kept  on  voting  for  Clark. 


When  Raker  Subsided 

Out  of  Washington  comes  a  story  about  our 
Congressman  Raker  which  has  caused  a  good  deal 


J.  C.  WILSON  &  CO. 


Members- 


("New  York  Stock  Exchange 

I  New  York  Cotton  Exchange 

j  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 

{The  Stock  and  Bond  Exchange,  S.  F. 


Main   Office— MILLS   BUILDING.   San  FrincUco 

Branch  Offices — Loi  Angeles,  San  Diego.  Coronado 
Beach,  Portland,  Ore..  Seattle,  Wash,  Vancouver,  B.  C. 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


9 


of  merriment  in  the  cloakroom  of  the  lower 
chamber.  Representative  Curley  of  Massachu- 
setts was  addressing  the  House  on  a  measure  of 
considerable  importance.  He  clinched  his  argu- 
ment by  declaring:  "Not  one  distinguished  mem- 
ber of  my  party  opposes  this  bill."  Then  up  rose 
Raker  of  Modoc  and  said:  "The  gentleman  from 
Massachusetts  forgets  that  I  oppose  this  bill." 
Congressman  Curley  looked  at  Raker  and  smiled 
a  bland  Massachusetts  smile.  "The  gentleman 
from  California  is  hasty,"  he  explained;  "I  spoke 
of  the  distinguished  members  of  my  party." 
Whereupon  Raker  subsided  and  was  heard  no 
more. 


A  Wizard  at  Figures 

Which  reminds  me  that  when  Raker  was  mak- 
ing his  final  effort  to  commend  his  Asiatic  Ex- 
clusion measure  to  a  House  which  would  have 
none  of  it,  he  submitted  figures  compiled  by 
Aleck  Yoell  of  the  Asiatic  Exclusion  League 
showing  the  number  of  Asiatics  who  had  been 
admitted  to  the  United  States  during  the  year 
ending  June  30.  The  figures  were  arresting  fig- 
ures, but  it  happened  that  they  were  presented  in 
April.  And  so  when  one  of  the  members  of  Con- 
gress remarked,  "A  wizard  like  the  gentleman 
from  California  who  can  forecast  the  emigration 
figures  for  May  and  June  must  forgive  us  if  we 
attach  less  than  face  value  to  the  figures  which 
he  obtained  without  clairvoyance,"  the  House 
guffawed  and  tossed  Raker's  bill  into  the  discard. 


Huntington  a  Collector 

Friends  of  Henry  E.  Huntington  tell  me  he  is 
bringing  to  Los  Angeles  one  of  the  finest  collec- 
tions of  works  of  art  in  the  country.  It  is  not 
generally  known  that  Huntington  has  become  a 
competitor  of  J.  Pierpont  Morgan  at  the  big  art 
sales  in  Europe.  Not  long  ago  he  paid  a  fabulous 
price  for  a  bible.  Last  month  he  got  hold  of 
three  Gainsboroughs,  and  the  total  price  paid 
was  $600,000.  They  were  all  pictures  with  a  his- 
tory. One  of  them  was  a  portrait  of  Penelope, 
wife  of  General  Edward  Ligonier  (Earl  Ligonier.) 
They  were  exhibited  in  the  Royal  Academy  the 
very  year  the  lady  eloped  with  the  poet  Count 
Alfieri.  Mr.  Huntington  also  has  a  portrait  of 
the  Duchess  of  Cumberland  by  Gainsborough.  It 
is  said  he  paid  $200,000  for  it.  The  Duchess  was 
a  favorite  subject  with  Gainsborough.  He  painted 
no  less  than  seven  portraits  of  her.  A  good  deal 
of  "Uncle  Colis"  Huntington's  money  is  going 
into  art.  Mrs.  C.  P.  Huntington  is  one  of  the 
notable  collectors  of  old  masterpieces.  She  has 
in  her  collection  a  number  of  Rembrandts.  Some 
time  ago  she  presented  to  the  Hispanic  Society 
of  America  a  Velasquez  which  cost  $400,000. 


Mrs.  Atherton  and  Her  Play 

Not  long  ago  I  wrote  a  paragraph  about  what 
I  called  Mrs.  Atherton's  "belated  discovery." 
From  an  interview  in  the  New  York  Sun  I  judged 
that  it  was  not  until  after  her  play  "Julia  France" 
was  written  that  she  received  her  first  lessons 
in  technique  from  Harrison  Grey  Fiske.  On  the 
fact  that  she  had  not  learned  her  technique  before 
tackling  playwriting  I  laid  the  blame  for  the 
play's  failure.  Perhaps  the  interviewer  misun- 
derstood Mrs.  Atherton;  or  perhaps  I  misunder- 
stood the  interviewer.  At  any  rate  Mrs.  Ather- 
ton writes  to  tell  me  that  the  play  was  not  a 
failure.  She  informs  me  that  it  was  merely  given 
a  tryout  on  the  last  night  of  Mrs.  Fiske's  engage- 
ment at  Toronto.  Mrs.  Fiske  had  discovered  af- 
ter beginning  rehearsals  that  the  big  part  was  the 
part  of  a  young  girl,  and  she  wanted  Mrs.  Ather- 
ton to  see  a  performance  before  building  up  the 
part  which  she  was  to  play.    But  Mrs.  Atherton 


likes  the  young  girl's  part  best,  so  she  has  de- 
cided not  to  strengthen  the  part  of  the  older 
woman.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fiske  have  expressed 
the  opinion  that  Mrs.  Atherton  has  more  theatre 
sense  and  more  instinctive  knowledge  of  the 
drama  than  many  old  hands  at  playwriting.  Mrs. 
Atherton  writes  me  that  it  was  not  the  technique 
which  bothered  her  but  the  dramatic  method  of 
writing  which  is  so  different  from  the  novelistic 
method  to  which  she  is  accustomed.  One  state- 
ment in  Mrs.  Atherton's  letter  will  commend  it- 
self strongly  to  all  who  know  anything  about  the 
drama.  "One  knows  nothing  about  playwriting," 
she  says,  "until  the  experience  of  rehearsals." 


Archer's  Strange  Advice 

In  this  connection  I  cannot  resist  quoting  an 
extraordinary  passage  from  William  Archer's  re- 
cently published   "Playmaking."    Here  it  is: 

"On  the  other  hand,  the  advice  one  is  apt  to 
give  to  beginners — 'Go  to  the  theatre,  study  its 
conditions  and  mechanism  for  yourself, — is,  in  fact, 
of  very  doubtful  value.  It  might,  in  many  cases, 
be  well  to  warn  the  aspirant  to  keep  himself  un- 
spotted from  the  playhouse.  To  send  him  there 
is  to  imperil,  on  the  one  hand,  his  originality  of 
vision;  on  the  other,  his  individuality  of  method. 
He  may  fall  under  the  influence  of  some  great 
master,  and  see  life  only  through  his  eyes;  or  he 
may  become  so  habituated  to  the  current  tricks 
of  the  theatrical  trade  as  to  lose  all  sense  of  their 
conventionality  and  falsity,  and  find  himself,  in 
the  end,  better  fitted  to  write  what  I  have  called 
a  quack  handbook  than  a  living  play.  It  would 
be  ridiculous,  of  course,  to  urge  an  aspirant  posi- 
tively to  avoid  the  theatre;  but  the  common  ad- 
vice to  steep  himself  in  it  is  beset  with  dangers." 

This  strikes  me  as  the  most  arrant  nonsense. 
The  man  who  expects  to  write  a  play  while  keep- 
ing himself  "unspotted  from  the  playhouse"  will 
never  produce  anything  but  closet  drama.  A  car- 
penter might  just  as  reasonably  try  to  preserve 
his  originality  in  house-building  by  keeping  aloof 
from  houses.  Must  the  novelist  refrain  from 
reading  fiction?  or  the  painter  shut  his  eyes  to  the 
old  masters?  William  Archer,  it  may  be  noted, 
is  not  a  playwright  but  only  a  translator  of  plays. 


"Jim"  Hill — Empire  Builder 

A  grand  old  man  is  James  J.  Hill,  the  last  of 
the  great  empire  builders  of  the  Far  West,  whose 
position  in  the  railway  world  has  been  unique 
since  the  death  of  Colis  P.  Huntington,  of  whom 
he  is  reminiscent  in  the  matter  of  force  of  char- 
acter, breadth  of  vision  and  executive  ability.  On 
his  seventy-fourth  birthday  which  occurred  two 
weeks  ago  James  J.  Hill  laid  down  the  work  in 
which  he  had  been  engaged  for  nearly  forty 
years.  At  midnight  of  that  day  he  ceased  to  be 
chairman  and  active  general  manager  of  the  Great 
Northern  Railway,  one  of  the  great  transporta- 
tion systems  of  the  country  which  he  projected, 
developed  and  completed.  Mr.  Hill  has  earned 
the  leisure  which,  as  he  says,  "every  man  looks 
for  who  has  borne  the  burden  and  heat  of  the 
day."  He  is  a  man  to  whom  much  honor  is  due; 
more,  perhaps,  than  to  any  other  living  American, 
but  who  thinks  of  him  as  a  man  especially  de- 
serving of  the  admiration  and  respect  of  his 
fellow  men?  None  but  the  thousandth  man  of 
the  multitude,  who  has  discernment,  who  realizes 
what  it  means,  what  it  has  meant  to  millions  of 
human  beings — the  opening  up  of  vast  stretches 
of  virgin  territory,  the  providing  of  essential 
facilities  to  home-builders  and  the  founders  of 
American  families.  How  innumerable  the  op- 
portunities that  James  J.  Hill  has  created  for 
men!  But  James  J.  Hill,  according  to  the  pop- 
ular conception  inspired  by  our  darling  politi- 
cians, the  voracious,  pestiferous  taxeaters  of  the 


country,  is  only  a  sordid  railroad  magna'^  who 
has  grown  rich  charging  all  the  traffic  will  bear. 


A  Sentimental  Octopus 

Whatever  may  be  thouglit  of  "Jim"  Ilill  it  will 
perhaps  be  interesting  to  know  what  he  thinks 
of  himself  and  get  a  line,  as  it  were,  on  his  ideals. 
In  his  valedictory  he  says:  "I  have  some  pride  in 
the  fact  that,  while  constantly  increasing  both  the 
volume  and  the  efficiency  of  its  service,  the  Great 
Northern  has  at  the  same  time  carried  to  market 
the  products  of  the  country  at  rates  which  have 
greatly   developed    the    territory    served   by  its 


LUNCH  75c  REGULAR  DINNER  $1.00 

Short  orders  at  all  hours.     Music  every  evening. 
Banquet  Hall.    Seating  Capacity  800. 


Techau  Tavern 

Cor.  Eddy  and  Powell  Streets 
SAN  FRANCISCO 

Douglas  4700       PHONES :     Home  C  34 1 7 


A  High  Class  Family  Cafe 

A  dainty  lunch  served  gratuitously  to  ladies  every 
day  during  shopping  hours,  between 
3:30  and  5:00  p.  m. 


UNDER  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF 

A.  C.  MORRISSON 


Jules  Restaurant 

Special  Lunches  50c  or  a  la  Carte 
Ladies'  Grill  and  Rooms  for  Parties 

Regular  French  Dinner  with  Wine,  $1.00 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Music 

MONADNOCK  BUILDING 

NEXT  TO  PALACE  HOTEL 
Phone  Kearny  1812 
ALL  CARS  PASS  THE  DOOR       ELEVATOR  SERVICE 


J.  B.  PON        J.  BERGF.Z        C.  M.MMIEBUAU 
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Bergez  -  Frank's 

OLD 

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CO. 

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Music  and  Entertainment  Every  Evening 
415-421  BUSH  STREET  SAN  FRANCISCO 

(Above  Kcnrny ) 
l'2xchange,  Douglas  2411 


10 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


lines."    Something  lie  has  reason  to  be  proud  of. 
but  how  strange  that  the  Octopus  should  take! 
pride  in  such  a  matter!    "Jim"  Hill  is  also  proudj 
that  he  has  done  well  as  a  manager  and  made| 
money  for  others.    He  says:  "All  the  other  trans- 
continental lines  had  received  large  subsidies  inj 
cash  or  land  grants,  or  both.    They  suffered  thcl 
check  of  financial  .stresses  and  passed  throughl 
receiverships    and    reorganizations.     The  Greall 
Northern,  which  includes  the   Manitoba,  never 
failed,  never  passed  a  dividend,  never  was  fin-| 
ancially    insecure    in    any    time    of   panic.  Fori 
thirty-three  years  its  credit  has  been  unimpairedl 
and  its  resources  equal  to  any  demands  uponi 
them,  and  in  times  of  financial  distress  it  hasl 
been  able   to  assist  materially  in   moving  thc| 
crops  of  the  Northwest.    The  security  of  the  in- 
vestments of  the  holders  of  stock  and  bonds  haij 
always  been  a  first  consideration,  and  the  suc- 
cess and  prosperity  that  attend  the  company  to- 
day have  not  been  purchased  either  by  any  doubt- 
ful transactions  in  the  stock  market  or  at  thel 
cost  of  one  dollar  ever  committed  by  man  orl 
woman  to  this  company  in  trust."    Even  in  thel 
railroad  business,   it  appears,  a   man   may  find| 
pleasure  in  realizing  that  he  is  a  benefactor  ofj 
his  countrymen. 


The  Financing  of  the  System 

Nowadays  the  impression  prevails  that  whcnS 


Mr.  Phelan  Honored 

What  a  melancholy  world  this  would  be  for 
the  Hon.  James  Duval  Phelan  were  there  no  ar- 
tists in  it?  Mr.  Phelan  is  beloved  of  artists. 
\nii  their  passion  is  reciprocated.  Mr.  Phelan  is 
our  most  liberal  patron  of  the  arts.  Mr.  Phelan 
s  a  cultured  man;  that  is,  he  knows  what's  what 
tnd  who's  who  in  the  world  of  art.  He  has 
taste  for  works  of  art.  He  knows  a  daub  from 
1  masterpiece,  a  poem  from  a  handsaw;  and  when 
le  meets  a  lady  novelist  he  can  quote  her  own 
vorks  to  her,  which  is  a  form  of  flattery  that 
not  even  the  most  eminent  literary  person  can 
esist.  It  is  really  too  bad  that  Mr.  Phelan 
doesn't  devote  all  his  time  to  artist  folk  and  thus 
ivoid  the  irritations  of  public  and  commercial  life. 
These  reflections  were  induced  by  a  little  book 
jf  poems  that  came  to  me  the  other  day  all  the 
.vay  from  Clifford's  Inn,  London,  where  it  was 
Trinted  for  the  author  Hermann  Scheflfauer,  a 
San  Francisco  poet  of  international  reputation, 
by  no  means  unknown  to  the  readers  of  Town 
Talk  who  have  had  the  pleasure  of  reading  both 
his  prose  and  poetry  first  hand.  The  book  is  en- 
titled "Drake  in  California."  It  is  a  book  of  bal- 
lads and  poems.  It  is  dedicated  to  James  Duval 
Phelan,  an  honor  far  from  novel  in  the  ex- 
perience of  our  cultured  millionaire,  but  none  the 
less  welcome.  Other  poets  have  been  similarly 
i'kind  to  Mr.  Phelan,  thus  compensating  him  for 


dealing  with  public  service  corporations  the  peo-j,(;^  ■  ^  o    --- 

pie  should  remember  nothing  but  that  they  madeFTthe  honors  which   he  has  sought  elsewhere  in 

possible  whatever  success  and  wealth  have  at-'|  |  vain,  honors  which  I  regard  as  much  less  worthy 

tended   corporate   enterprise.    As  public   service  '  of  his  ambition.    There  are  men  remembered  for 

corporations  derive  their  revenue  from  the  pub-.  '  nothing  but  the  love  that  poets  had  for  them. 

lie  therefore  gratitude  should  all  be  on  the  side  '  It  may  be  a  cheap  form  of  immortality,  but  even 

of  the  corporations.    Such  is  the  argument  of  the'  it  is  better  than  the  kind  Carnegie  is  buying 

political  polemic.    With  this  sentiment  in  mind     f,,_       „r^^;„;^„„  ;        -m     r  i- 

f  lor  a  prodigious  price.    My  felicitations  to  our 

It  IS  instructive  to  read  the  history  of  the  Great         ,  , 

patrf)n  of  the  arts. 

Northern  as  told  by  Mr.  Hill.  The  big  railway 
project  had  its  inception  just  after  the  panic  of 
1873  when  the  payments  of  the  old  St.  Paul  and 
Pacific  Company  were  in  the  hands  of  a  receiver. 
The  holders  of  the  securities  in  Holland  were 
anxious  to  recover  what  they  could  from  the 
wreck.  They  would  invest  no  money  in  improve- 
ments and  extension.  The  only  value  lay  in 
potentialities,  and  the  reorganization  of  the  prop- 
erty was  regarded  as  visionary.  So  it  required  a 
visionary  to  take  hold,  and  James  J.  Hill  was  the 
man.  The  prf)blcni  was  to  pay  off  an  indebted- 
ness of  $44,0(X),(XX),  and  he  wrestled  with  it.  He 
first  obtained  an  option,  and  there  was  not  a 
financial  house  in  Europe  or  America  that  would 
take  the  bargain  off  his  hands.  Today  the  Great 
Northern  has  a  bond  issue  of  $600,000,000,  and 
there  is  no  private  estate  in  the  country  more  care- 
fully provided  against  the  future  than  this  big  rail- 
road system.  Touching  this  subject  Mr.  Hill  says: 
"It  has  a  provision  made  now,  deliberately  and 
not  under  any  pressure  of  necessity,  for  the 
work  of  years  to  come.  That  provision  may  be 
utilized  in  lean  years  and  held  in  suspense  in  fat 
years,  so  as  always  to  realize  the  best  prices  for 
securities  and  to  keep  the  credit  of  the  company 
unimpaired.  No  emergency  can  surprise  it.  It 
is  financed  for  a  period  beyond  which  it  would 
be  fanciful  to  attempt  to  provide.  And  the  de- 
velopment of  its  business  throughout  every  part 
of  the  practically  half  a  continent  which  it  serves 
makes  the  payment  of  dividends  on  the  stock  as 
certain  as  that  of  its  bond  coupons.  There  has 
never  been  a  default  in  either.  There  has  never 
been  a  dollar's  worth  of  stock  or  bonds  issued 
that  was  not  paid  for  in  cash,  property,  or  services 
at  its  actual  cash  value  at  the  time.  The  stock 
has  paid  a  dividend  ever  since  1882,  and  since  1900 
the  rate  has  remained  steadily  at  7  per  cent."  It 
is  to  be  hoped  that  nobody  begrudges  Mr.  Hill 
his  vacatiom. 


His  Verses 

Poet  Scheffaucr  has  become  converted  to  the 
perpetual  peace  propaganda.  In  his  opening 
verses  "The  Ballad  of  the  Battlefield"  he  scoffs 
at  the  glory  of  war  thus: 

"The   red   hands   shall   be  dead  hands,   the  red 

cheeks  shall  be  grey, — 
Yesterday  all  red  with  life,  white  with  death  to- 
day. 

What  is  a  soldier's  wife? 
No  more  than  a  soldier's  life! 
For  his  red  hands  soon  are  dead  hands,  his  red 
cheeks  soon  are  grey." 

mm^  :  ■ 

In  this  ballad  the  poet  gives  us  the  lamentations 
in  the  other  world  of  three  victims  of  war — a 
father,  a  son  and  a  bridegroom-to-be.  There  is 
spirited  writing  in  this  ballad,  and  it  might  well 
serve  the  peace  propagandists  as  a  dramatic  piece 
for  recitation.  The  title  poem  "Drake  in  Cali- 
fornia" is  good  metrical  narrative  written  in  the 
archaic  style.  The  movement  of  the  verse  is 
sometimes  uncertain,  but  there  is  much  in  it  to 
return  upon  and  to  admire.  In  this  little  volume 
the  San  Francisco  poet  shows  the  effect  of  new 
influences.  He  has  broadened  and  become  surer 
of  himself,  and  his  poetry  is  the  poetry  of  a 
strong,  keen  mind,  full  of  rapture,  full  of  definite 
pictures  and  clear  imagery.  One  of  the  most 
striking  of  his  pieces  is  "The  Ballad  of  the  Leper" 
of  which  he  says: 

"In  Euston  Road  in  London  Town 
I  saw  and  felt  and  wrote  this  down." 

There  is  a  touch  of  Baudelaire  in  the  ballad,  and 
it  is  in  the  deepest  and  most  perfect  vein  of 
poetry.    For  example: 


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July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


11 


She  stood  enrapped  with  charnel  air 

And  pestilence's  breath; 
The  winds  of  life  had  whipped  her  bare 

And  given  her  to  Death. 

It  seemed  his  voice  of  doom  and  blight 

Rang  round  her  like  a  dirge, 
And  from  her  face,  like  spectral  light, 

Gleamed  forth  the  Great  White  Scourge. 

Again  in  "The  Prayer  of  Beggarman  Death," 
"a  rime  macabre"  as  he  calls  it; 

Oh,  when  shall  India's  famine  maw 
Grant  me  her  bronzen  bodies  thick? 

Or  Cholera,  grey  in  tooth  and  claw, 
Strike  gasping  cities  cold  and  sick? 

By  Peace  and  Doctors  I  am  doomed 
Like  War  and  my  ally  Disease; 

Scant  food  I've  had  since  I  consumed 

Shag  Russians  and  plump  Japanese. 

In  several  of  the  poems  which  I  would  like 
to  quote,  sweetness,  gravity  and  strength  are 
blended  in  the  spirit  of  a  calm  contemplativeness. 
I  haven't  the  space  to  give  my  readers  an 
adequate  idea  of  the  varied  interest  of  the  con- 
tents. 


Walter  Parker 

The  civic  patriots  of  the  Progress  press  of 
California  have  been  bereaved  of  one  of  their 
favorite  objects  of  obloquy.  Walter  Parker  died 
in  Los  Angeles  last  Sundaj.  For  many  years 
Walter  Parker,  by  reason  of  iiis  duties  as  an 
official  of  the  Southern  Paciiic  Company,  was 
quite  active  in  politics.  He  was  known  as  a 
"machine  politician,"  a  "performer,"  by  which 
designations  it  was  implied  that  he.  was  a  most 
undesirable  citizen.  And  so  when  any  of  the 
civic  patriots  of  the  immaculate  press  wished  to 
impress  the  public  with  the  urgent  necessity  of 
political  regeneration  they  spoke  in  a  vague  way 
of  "men  like  Walter  Parker"  whose  malign  in- 
fluence ought  to  be  destroyed.  Whenever  the 
civic  patriots  were  urging  the  election  of  one  of 
their  own  kind  or  promoting  any  selfish  scheme 
of  putative  reform  they  represented  Parker  as  one 
of  the  active  opponents,  thus  suggesting  the  in- 
ference that  virtue  was  all  on  side  and  evil  on 
the  other.  And  in  this  way  they  probably  cre- 
ated a  vivid  impression  of  Walter  Parker  in  the 
susceptible  minds  of  their  followers.  Now  what 
sort  of  man  was  Walter  Parker?  In  Walter 
Parker  there  predominated  those  traits  of  char- 
acter that  win  for  the  individual  the  esteem  of 
his  fellow-men.  An  educated  man  was  Walter 
Parker,  a  man  with  a  very  nimble  wit,  a  most 
agreeable  companion,  and  above  all  a  most  loyal 
friend,  with  such  lovingkindness  in  his  nature 
that  he  was  placable  even  toward  his  most  un- 
just critics.  Morally  Walter  Parker  was  far 
above  the  average  even  of  civic  patriots  and  pious 
reformers.  If  he  was  ever  cynical  it  was  when 
he  was  discussing  the  reform  activities  of  such 


men  as  Earle  and  Lissncr  and  Rovvell,  with  all 
of  whom  he  had  had  some  personal  experience. 
But  he  never  spoke  of  them  harshly  or  in  anger. 
Walter  Parker  was  in  politics  many  years,  and 
there  is  not  a  man  in  the  State  who  can  recall 
anything  dishonorable  in  his  career.  Men  of  the 
Parker  type  are  deeply  lamented  when  gone. 


Farewell  to  Trinity 

"Next  Sunday  will  be  my  last  appearance  in 
any  church,"  Louis  Eaton  told  me  the  other  day. 
I  was  shocked.  "That  is  to  say,"  Louis  added 
iiastily,  "my  last  appearance  as  a  musician."  I 
was  greatly  relieved  to  find  that  he  hadn't 
turned  ungodly.  "I'm  through,"  he  said.  "Forty 
years  of  church  work  is  enough.  Henceforth  I 
devote  myself  to  my  pupils.  The  church  choir 
knows  me  no  more.  The  work  is  too  wearing; 
it  tears  too  strenuously  at  your  nerves.  And 
church  singers  are  hard  to  handle.  Some  people 
may  think  that  their  religious  devotion  would 
hold  them  together.  Not  so.  Their  devotion  is 
devotion  to  music  alone.  After  next  Sunday 
night  I'll  be  free.  I'll  feel  like  a  boy  on  a  vaca- 
tion. Do  you  know  where  I'll  spend  the  first 
free  Sunday  night  in  forty  years?  At  Caesar's!" 
Louis  H.  Eaton  has  been  organist  and  choir 
director  at  Trinity  for  eleven  years,  and  it  is 
owing  to  his  good  work  that  Trinity  boasts  the 
besf  choir  this  side  of  Salt  Lake  City.  He  came 
to  this  city  from  New  Bedford,  Massachusetts, 
at  the  time  of  the  Episcopal  General  Convention, 
and  Dr.  Clampett  induced  him  to  remain.  He  or- 
ganized a  vt)Iuntecr  choir  (if  thirty-six  singers 
for  Trinity,  and  has  recruited  it  principally  from 
liis  own  pupils  during  the  last  few  years.  Some 
of  the  best  singers  about  town  have  graduated 
from  Trinity  and  Louis  Eaton's  direction.  Among 
them  may  be  mentioned  Mrs.  J.  D.  Gish  (Millie 
Flynn),  Mrs.  J.  E.  Birmingham,  Una  Fairweather 
and  Harry  Barnhard.  '  Needless  to  say,  Trinity  is 
very  sorry  to  lose  Louis  Eaton,  but  his  teaching 
work  so  engrosses  his  time  that  he  finds  it  im- 
possible to  continue  at  the  head  of  the  choir  any 
longer.  Besides,  he  is  busily  engaged  writing  the 
music  for  the  Family  Club's  farm  play.  j 


The  Lady  Clubsters 

A  fine  body  of  women  was  that  which  tarried 
with  us  during  the  convention  of  women's  clubs. 
The  intellect  as  well  as  the  purely  sexual  charm 
of  the  dear  sex  was  splendidly  represented.  They 
liked  the  city  and  were  enchanted  with  our  shops. 
And  so  they  spent  money  freely,  in  the  main. 
There  were  exceptions,  as  there  always  must  be 
in  such  a  gathering.  A  friend  who  has  a  good 
but  modest  restaurant  on  the  south  side  just  a 
few  steps  from  the  busiest  part  of  Market  street 


ALL  SUMMER  RESORTS 

serve  Italian-Swiss  Colony  wines  In  tlieir  guests. 
TlPO  (red  or  white)  is  especially  popular. 


told  me  of  some  of  the  exceptions.  Naturally  he 
caters  to  men  and  women  of  slender  purse.  But 
his  experience  of  San  Francisco  men  and  women 
of  slender  purse  had  not  prepared  him  for  the 
economical  methods  of  some  of  the  dear  ladies 
who  came  here  from  Akron  and  Kokomo  and 
Kalamazoo.  "One  day  six  of  them  came  into  my 
place,"  he  says,  "and  after  making  careful  in- 
quiries about  prices,  ordered  six  cantaloupes  at 
ten  cents  apiece.  Every  one  made  a  luncheon  of 
her  cantaloupe  and  on  leaving,  every  one  paid  her 
separate  ten  cents.  Another  time  two  of  the 
delegates  came  in  and  each  of  them  bought  three 
unsliccd  tomatoes,  also  paying  separately.  There 
were  other  instances  of  the  same  sort.  It  struck 
me  as  funny,  because  San  Francisco  people  don't 
do  tli.it  sr>rt  of  thing." 


Notable  Cousins 

Now  that  Mr.  Phelan  and  Mr.  Spreckels  and 
the  other  Progressives  of  California  are  filled 
with  enthusiasm  for  the  Democratic  ticket  it  may 
interest  them  to  learn  that  the  most  active 
booster  behind  Tom  Marshall  of  Indiana  was  that 
gentleman's  cousin  who  happens  to  be  no  less 
a  personage  than  Mr.  Patrick  Calhoun,  traffic 
magnate  of  San  Francisco  and  Cleveland.  Cal- 
houn and  the  Governor  of  Indiana  are  descend- 
ants of  the  revered  Chief  Justice  of  the  early  days 
of  the  Republic. 


Court  Room  Repartee 

"You  liavcn't  been  around  for  a  story  in  some 
time,"  remarked  the  Man  Who  Winds  the  Ferry 
Clock  when  I  hailed  him  on  the  Enibarcadero.  I 
acknowledged  the  soft  impeachment  and  con- 
fessed that  I  was  in  a  receptive  mood.  "Ever 
hear  the  retort  Tom  O'Connor  made  to  Hiram 
Johnson  in  the  Collins  case?"  he  asked.  I  ad- 
mitted that  it  had  escaped  me.  "Judge  Lennon 
was  sitting  for  Lawlor  at  the  time,"  explained 
the  Man  Who  Winds  the  Ferry  Clock.  "George 
Collins  who  had  been  using  every  means  in  his 
power  to  delay  the  trial  came  into  court  one 
morning   and    announced    that    he   was  witnout 


Photographs 

Whigham's  Art  Studios 

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1615  Fillmore  Street,  Near  Geary 
Phones:         West  7831         Home  J  1223        S  3757 
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Edward  Rolkin.  Mgr.  Geo.  A.  Dixon,  Asst.  Mgr. 


Telaphone  Kearny  1 1 


Armor  Plate  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

OF  UNION  SAFE  DEPOSFT  COMPANY  IN  BUILDING  OF 

Union  Trust  Company 
=  of  San  Francisco  = 

JUNCTION  OF 

MARKET  and  O'FARRELL  STS. 
and  GRANT  AVE. 

Largest,  Strongest  and  Most  Conveniently 
Arranged  Safe  Deposit  West  of  New  York 

BOXES  $4.00  PER  ANNUM  AND  UPWARDS 


HAMMOCKS 

We  have  an  overstock  aiul  will  sacrifice  these 
Hammocks  at  a  very  low  price.  We  arc  making  a 
specialty  of  liluc  and  White  Canvas  Striped  Ham- 
mocks at  $1.J5  each. 

WEEKS- HOWE- EMERSON  COMPANY 

51  Market  Street      San  Francisco 


12 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


counsel.  To  consume  time  he  asked  that  Peter 
Dunne  or  Delmas  or  Charlie  Wheeler  or  Charlie 
Heggerty  be  appointed  to  represent  him.  None 
of  these  attorneys  was  in  court.  Judge  Lennon 
noticed  that  Tom  O'Connor  wa.'^  sitting  in  the 
room  and  he  appointed  him  to  handle  the  case. 
Collins  immediately  instructed  O'Connor  to  ask 
for  a  continuance  in  order  that  he  might  familiar- 
ize himself  with  the  case.  O'Connor  did  so,  and 
Hiram  Johnson  who  was  special  prosecutor  ob- 
jected. 'This  is  all  bosh,'  he  exclaimed.  'This 
young  man  will  have  little  to  do  with  this  case, 
your  honor.  What  he  may  have  to  say  will  pro- 
ceed from  the  mouth  of  O'Connor  but  it  will 
come  from  the  brain  of  Collins.'  Whereupon 
O'Connor  said  to  the  court:  'Your  honor,  counsel 
has  been  kind  enough  to  describe  me  as  a  human 
phonograph.  In  that  case  it  is  only  fair  that  I 
be  given  time  to  prepare  my  record.'  And  he  got 
the  continuance." 


Purely  Personal 

When  Frank  Drew  traveled  through  Europe  he 
met  interesting  men  and  women  everywhere 
whom  he  wouldn't  have  met  except  for  his  knowl- 
edge of  Esperanto. 

If  you  want  to  get  Sam  Ruckcr.  the  furniture 
magnate,  furious,  just  say  a  few  words  in  praise 
of  the  Baltimore  hotels. 

Ed  Hurlburt  of  the  Post  made  such  a  hit  with 
his  police  reporter  stories  in  Collier's  that  the 
magazine  people  are  begging  him  for  more. 

Bob  Fitzgerald  of  Oakland  made  an  epigram 
at  the  Baltimore  convention.  "This  man  Bryan," 
he  said,  "replied  to  a  hypothetical  question  with 
a  hypocritical  answer." 

Those  who  haven't  heard  John  McGregor  of  the 
Union  Iron  Works  sing  "Annie  Laurie"  don't 
know  what  they've  missed. 

Between  Mr.  E.  O.  McCormick  and  Mr.  George 
Pippy  there  is  a  strong  resemblance  not  only  in 
the  matter  of  whiskers  but  in  the  matter  also  of 
temperament  as  expressed  by  the  glad  hand  which 
member,  in  both  instances  has  the  exceptional 
accompaniment  of  a  warm  heart.  Their  friends 
are  trying  to  solve  the  question  as  to  which  of 
them  derives  the  most  benefit  from  the  similarity 
of  whiskers.  As  Pippy  travels  a  good  deal,  and 
as  the  conductors  and  porters  mistake  him  for 
Mr.  McCormick  1  think  he  has  a  shade  on  his 
double. 

Eugene  de  Sabla  is  reckoned  the  greatest  pro- 
moter in  the  United  States.  A  prominent  fin- 
ancier, asked  what  quality  is  most  essential  in 
the  promotion  game,  promptly  replied:  "The 
quality  of  looking  like  millions  when  you  have 
something  to  sell."  De  Sabla,  by  the  way,  is  now 
in  Europe  promoting  something  which,  he  says, 
will  make  the  whole  United .  States  sit  up  and 
take  notice  when  the  deal  goes  through. 


so  much  activity  in  the  real  estate  market  all  over 
Alameda  County.  A.  C.  Parsons  &  Co.  report  the 
sale  of  208  lots  in  the  Pullman  Center  tract.  The 
Laymance  Company  has  sold  a  large  number  of 
high  class  residence  properties  in  the  Rockridge 
Park  and  also  in  other  locations,  the  aggregate 
price  of  which  runs  well  up  into  six  figures. 

The  indications  are  that  building  operations  will 
be  carried  on  this  year  on  an  extensive  scale  in 
Oakland.  George  W.  Nickerson  has  begun  the 
construction  of  four  cottages  on  32nd  street,  and 
the  Eagles  have  had  plans  drawn  for  a  building 
at  the  Boulevard  and  Pullman  avenue. 


CARNIVAL  TIME  IN  SANTA  CRUZ 

Fred  Swanton,  ambassador  extraordinary  from 
the  joyous  kingdom  of  Santa  Cruz,  announces  the 
completion  of  all  arrangements  for  the  water 
pageant  and  summer  festival  planned  for  that  re- 
sort during  the  week  commencing  July  20  and 
ending  July  28.  According  to  official  bulletins 
from  the  throne-room  of  King  Pleasure — situated 
for  the  next  four  weeks  in  the  big  Casino,  facing 
the  beach — Santa  Cruz  has  been  transformed  into 
a  veritable  "City  o'  Dreams"  in  anticipation  of 
the  great  crowd  of  merrymakers  that  will  assem- 
ble there  during  "Water  Week."  No  expense  has 
been  spared  to  make  the  Sea  Breeze  City  attrac- 
tive and  insure  the  happiness  of  a  throng.  The 
hotels,  the  Casino,  the  attractions  lining  the 
mile-long  board-walk,  have  all  been  polished  and 
put  in  order — while  a  hundred  new  sensations 
await    the   visitor    who    comes    to    Santa  Cruz, 


whether  it  be  for  rest,  recreation  or  a  rollicking 
romp  beside  the  sea.  Even  the  usually  indifferent 
fishermen  on  the  long  wharf  near  Lighthouse 
Point  can  be  seen  scouring  up  their  launches  and 
preparing  for  the  jolly  parties  which  will  want  to 
troll.  The  mystic  island  upon  which  is  con- 
structed an  immense  phantom  ship  seating  4,000 
persons,  commands  a  beautiful  view  of  the  re- 
inforced San  Lorenzo  river,  down  which  will  come 
nightly  a  procession  of  flower-decked,  electric- 
lighted  floats,  filled  with  pretty  maids  and  stal- 
wart youths.  The  background  of  hillocks,  reach- 
ing down  to  the  water,  has  also  been  sprinkled 
generously  with  twinkling  lamps,  making  a  pic- 
ture of  exquisite  beauty.  A  wonderful  lake  has 
been  formed  around  the  island,  while  the  bridge 
leading  to  it  will  remind  one  of  the  Pont  du  Gar 
on  carnival  nights  in  Paris.  The  day's  sports  in 
Monterey  Bay,  off  shore  from  the  Casino,  will 
be  continuous.  Coupled  with  the  bathing,  fishing 
and  boat-riding  will  be  the  great  yacht  and  motor- 
boat  races;  the  fleet  of  warships  and  submarines; 
the  hydroplanes  in  their  flights  'twixt  wind  and 
water;  and  a  dozen  other  novelties.  On  shore 
will  be  golf,  tennis,  dancing,  driving  and  kindred 
diversions.  The  railroads  are  offering  special 
low  fares  from  all  California  points  to  Santa  Cruz 
during  pageant  week.  The  hotels — among  them 
the  beautiful  new  Casa  del  Rev  and  the  St. 
George — have  announced  that  no  "extras"  will  be 
charged,  the  regular  rates  being  maintained 
throughout  the  festivities.  Reservations  for  the 
Casa  del  Rey  and  the  Cottage  City  may  be  made 
now,  to  take  eflfcct  on  July  20  or  thereafter,  as 
preferred. 


r 


Across  the  Bay 

That  new  electric  railroad  which  will  soon  con- 
nect Oakland  with  the  Sacramento  Valley  is 
causing  investors  to  sit  up  and  take  notice.  This 
is  the  most  important  of  all  the  enterprises  that 
of  late  have  given  new  impetus  to  business  across 
the  bay.     It  is  one  of  the  reasons  why  there  is  L 


$72.SO 

To  Chicago  and  Return 

on  the  peerless 

GOLDEN  STATE  LIMITED 

A  Transcontinental  Delight 

This  rate  good  on  many  days  in  June 
July,  August  and  September 

Similar  low  rates  to  many  other  eastern  points 
Return  Limit  October  31,  1912 


Telephone  or  write  our  Agents 

ROCK  ISLAND 
SOUTHERN  PACIFIC 


Thru  Railroad  Tickets 


Issued  to  All  Parts  of 


PORTLAND 

Sails  12  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $10,  $12,  $15.    2d  class  $6.00. 

The  San  Francisco  and  Portland  S.  S.  Co. 

A.  OTTIXGER,  General  Agent. 


United  States,  Canada  and  Mexico 

In  connection  with   These   Magnificent   Passenger  Steamers 

LOS  ANGELES 

Sails  11  a.  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $8.35.     2d  class  $5.35. 

Ticket  Office,  722  Market.    Phone  Sutter  2344 

8    East    Street,    opp.    Ferry    Building.    Phone    Sutter  2482 

Berkeley    Office,    2105     Shattuck.       Phone     Berkeley  331 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


13 


A  MOTOR  CAR  MUSEUM 

Great  interest  has  been  aroused  in  this  country, 
as  well  as  abroad,  by  the  recent  opening,  in  the 
fashionable  West  End  of  London,  of  the  per- 
manent Motor  Museum  founded  by  the  English 
automobile  journal  "Motor."  It  is  intended  that 
in  time  the  museum  shall  be  a  treasure-house  of 
historical  motor-cars,  motor-cycles  and  acces- 
sories; and  a  good  start  in  this  direction  has  al- 
ready been  made.  The  wonderful  progress  of 
the  automobile  industry  could  not  be  illustrated 
better  than  it  is  in  this  British  collection — unless 
some  one  should  found  a  similar  American 
Museum,  as  enthusiasts  have  suggested.  Such  an 
American  collection  might,  indeed,  put  the  British 
exhibit  in  second  place.  For  the  most  notable 
relic  the  Londoners  have  is  the  "Blue  Belle" 
steamer  which  is  hardly  a  motor-car  at  all  in  the 
modern  sense;  and  a  French  car  of  1891  is  the 
oldest  specimen. of  the  present-day  type  of  atito- 
mobile — spoken  of  by  English  writers  as  "the  old- 
est in  the  world,"  though  there  is  said  to  be  in 
the  Smithsonian  Institution's  collection  in  Wash- 
ington an  American  car  dating  back  to  the  same 
year.  If  the  plan  proposed  for  establishing  an 
American  Motor  Museum  comes  to  fruition,  the 
United  States  will  be  able  to  make,  from  the 
work  of  its  own  inventors,  as  good  a  showing  of 
antiquities  as  London's,  which  are  drawn  from 


lill  over  the  world.  And  it  is  safe  to  say  that 
Ithe  stages  of  progress  in  automobile  building  can 
ibe  even  more  interestingly  illustrated  by  the 
American  cars  than  by  foreign  cars.  According 
'to  Col.  A.  W.  Bradbury,  president  of  the  Pacific 
Motor  Car  Company,  distributors  of  the  well 
known  Stevens-Duryea  motor  cars,  the  American 
motor  car,  from  the  first  workable  gasoline,  which 
J.  Frank  Duryea  brought  out  in  1891,  has,  it  is 
fair  to  say,  progressed  faster  than  the  European. 
No  other  industry,  in  this  country  of  astonishing 
industrial  achievements  has  had  any  such 
spectacular  growth  or  has  made  such  startling 
progress.  Nor  has  it  by  any  means  been  a  mat- 
ter of  simply  going  on  from  the  work  of  foreign 
inventors.  The  American  motor  car  is  in  many 
respects  a  distinct  creation — the  unit  power-plant 
and  three  point  support,  for  instance,  (both 
Duryea  inventions)  have  had  their  influence  on 
the  continental  designers.  And  almost  from  the 
day  of  the  "Duryea  Wagon,"  American  cars  have 
competed  sharply  with  the  European  ones  in  their 
own  countries,  till  now  there  is  an  export  busi- 
ness which  makes  the  foreign  builders  decidedly 
uncomfortable. 


Customer- — This  is  an  absurdly  small  steak. 
Waiter — Yes,  sir,  but  it'll  take  a  long  time  to 
eat  it,  sir. 


POINTED  PARAGRAPHS 

Fusing  as  a  good  example  is  an  easy  job. 

When  you  meet  a  trouble-borrower  lend  him 
all  you  have. 

Lies  may  fool  a  few  people,  hut  the  truth  fools 
a  great  many. 

French  self-taught  is  usually  confined  to 
French  self-understood. 

Tile  coat  may  ncjt  make  the  man,  but  hiwsuits 
make  the  attorney. 

When  some  doctors  disagree  the  patient  has 
a  tigluing  chance  for  his  life. 

Small  favors  are  always  thankfully  received, 
but  often  unthankfully  remembered. 

Occasionally  a  man  has  nothing  to  say  on  a 
subject  because  he  knows  all  about  it. 

In  addition  to  the  criticism  he  is  entitled  to, 
every  man  gets  a  lot  tliat  lie  can't  account  for. 

It's  a  safe  bet  tliat  every  woman  who  owns  a 
princess  gown  honestly  believes  that  she  has  a 
perfect  figure. 

A  spinster  thinks  it's  up  to  her  to  take  a  bach- 
elor seriously — otherwise  she  may  not  get  a 
chance  to  take  him  at  all. 

Wlien  a  young  man  sits  W  feet  away  from  a 
girl  and  calmly  informs  her  that  she  is  the  first 
and  only  love  she  can  bank  on  his  veracity. 


You  Can  t  Fool  a  Motor  Car 

It  knows  a  good  oil— and  a  bad— and  if  you  feed  it  poor  oil,  it 
will  tell  you  so  before  long  in  the  very  unwelcome  language  of 
cylinder  troubles;  pounding,  misfiring  and  carbon  deposits,  if 
you  lubricate  it  with 


lEROLENE 


you  reduce  lubrication  troubles  to  the  minimum.  This  is  because  Zerolene 
is  produced  by  a  special  process  which  we  have  worked  out  with  great 
care  in  order  to  secure  the  peculiar  lubricating  qualities  required  for  a  gas 
engine. 

You  secure  the  benefit  of  our  many  years  of  experience  when  you  buy 
Zerolene.    In  addition  to  Cylinder  Oil,  the  Zerolene  Brand  includes — 

Zerolene  Transmission  Lubricants 
Zerolene  up  Grease 
Zerolene  Fibre  Grease 

These  cover  the  lubricating  requirements  of  ever})  part  of  automobile  machineiy 
FOR   SALE  EVERYWHERE 


Standard  Oil  Company 

(Incorporated ) 


San  Francisco,  Cal. 
Los  Angeles,  Cal. 
San  Dieso,  Cal. 


San  Jose,  Cal. 
Stockton,  Cal. 
Sacramonto,  CaL 


Marysville,  Cal. 
Fresno.  Cal. 
Oakland,  Cal. 


Portland,  Ore. 
Nome,  Alaska 
Honolulu.  T.  H. 


Seattle,  Wash. 
Spokane.  Wash, 
Tacoma,  Wash. 


14 


TOWN    TALK  juiy  13,  1912 


Catholic  Families  United 

When  Ed  Tobin  takes  Abby  Parrott  to  wife 
two  of  our  oldest,  strictest  and  staunchest 
Catholic  families  will  be  united.  For  your  life 
you  can't  think  of  a  more  representative  Catholic 
family  than  the  Tobins  unless  it  is  the  Parrotts. 
And  if  anybody  said:  "The  Parrotts  are  our  most 
distinguished  Catholic  family,"  you  would  be 
perfectly  justified  in  raising  a  doubt  by  inter- 
jecting, "Perhaps  so,  but  don't  overlook  the 
Tobins."  Old  Mrs.  Abby  Parrott  and  "Old  Lady" 
Tobin,  as  she  is  affectionately  called  by  those 
who  have  the  distinction  of  her  friendship  are 
props  of  the  Church.  While  they  have  always 
maintained  a  high  position  in  society  they  have 
done  so  without  mingling  in  the  giddy  whirl,  be- 
ing in  this  regard  quite  unlike  that  vigorous 
dowager  Queen  Eleanor  Martin.  Mrs.  Parrott 
and  Mrs.  Tobin  spend  more  time  in  church  than 
anywhere  else.  If  you  happen  to  run  across  Mrs. 
Tobin  in  the  lobby  of  the  Fairmont  where  she 
lives  very  quietly,  as  likely  as  not  you  will  notice 
that  she  carries  her  prayer  book.  The  same 
would  hold  good  if  you  happened  to  meet  Mrs. 
Parrott  in  the  neighborhood  of  her  home  "Bay- 
wood"  in  San  Mateo.  So  the  marriage  of  Miss 
Parrott  and  Ed  Tobin  will  be  a  great  religious  as 
well  as  a  great  social  event.  Wherever  it  is 
celebrated  there  are  sure  to  be  dignitaries  of  the 
church  on  the  altar.  If  they  are  married  in 
Paris  a  cardinal  is  likely  to  be  present. 


A  Popular  Bachelor 

Abby  Parrott,  the  fiancee  of  Ed  Tobin,  has  not 
been  seen  much  in  this  part  of  the  world.  After 
she  graduated  from  the  College  of  the  Sacred 
Heart  at  Menlo  she  went  abroad  with  her  parents, 
the  Jack  Parrotts.  They  have  a  beautiful  villa 
in  Switzerland  near  the  historic  spot  where  Gib- 
bon wrote  the  "Decline  and  Fall."  But  they 
spend  most  of  their  time  in  Paris.  Still,  Abby  made 
her  debut  here  and  was  seen  at  a  few  Greenways 
two  years  ago.  Since  then  she  has  been  abroad. 
She  was  joined  not  long  ago  by  her  sisters,  Emilie 
and  Josephine  who,  their  grandmother  thought, 
were  having  too  good  a  time  in  this  giddy  com- 
munity. But  if  Abby  Parrott  is  a  comparative 
stranger,  Ed  Tobin  is  one  of  us.  He's  one  of  the 
most  popular  bachelors  in  San  Francisco.  And 
despite  the  fact  that  he  loves  travel  and  has 
spent  a  good  deal  of  his  time  on  the  other  side 
he  is  enamored  of  San  Francisco.  I've  heard  him 
say  many  a  time  that  it  has  charms  which  Paris, 
London  and  Vienna  can't  touch.  Ed  has  never 
been  what  might  be  called  a  devotee  of  social 
affairs.  He  attended  a  tolerable  number  of 
Greenways  and  so  on,  but  he  never  took  such 
things  as  seriously  as  some  of  our  other  young 
men  did.  The  last  time  I  saw  him  was  at  the 
Mardi  Gras.  He  was  dressed  like  a  Tommy 
Atkins  and  made  one  of  the  distinct  hits  of  the 
evening  in  his  close-fitting  scarlet  and  his  perky 
little  cap. 


LUCERNE  APARTMENTS 

766  SUTTER  STREET,  near  Jones 
JUST  OPENED 

Elegant  sunny  2,  3,  4  and  S-room  apartments  with 
complete  service.    Furnished  or  unfurnished. 

Telephone  Franklin  7866 


Social  Prattle 

By  TANTALUS 

The  Tobin  Culture 

Like  all  the  other  Tobins  Ed  is  cultured,  un- 
oDtrusively  but  soundly  so.  He  likes  good  books, 
good  pictures,  good  music  and  good  plays;  likes 
them  and  likes  the  society  of  those  who  sin- 
cerely appreciate  them.  That's  a  Tobin  trait. 
The  most  conspicuous  instance  of  it  is  his  sister 
.•\gnes  who  is  one  of  the  most  highly  cultivated 
women  California  has  produced.  Her  position  in 
the  holy  of  holies  of  London's  intellectual  so- 
ciety is  secure.  People  like  Mrs.  Meynell,  the 
Chesterons,  the  Bellocs  and  the  rest  of  that  bril- 


rii"ti..    K,:ithryn  Hopkins 


MISS  CORO.N.A  (;hir.\rdklli 

The  charming  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Domigo 
Chirardelli.  She  is  a  prominent  girl  in  the  younger  set 
who  possesses,  among  other  attractions,  a  voice  of  rare 
quality. 

liant  coterie  are  her  intimate  friends.  Dick  Tobin  is 
another  instance.  He  is  as  much  at  home  in  a 
library  as  on  the  polo  field,  which  is  saying  a 
great  deal.  And  Joe  Tobin  is  never  too  busy  with 
his  law  or  his  social  engagements  to  keep  abreast 
of  the  times  in  matters  of  the  mind.  The  Tobin 
boys  are  all  college  men  who  distinguished  them- 
selves before  taking  their  degrees  and  never  out- 
lived the  lure  of  their  books. 


The  Coming  Debutantes 

The  debutantes  for  next  season  have  not  as 
yet  been  duly  heralded.  Two  of  the  most  prom- 
inent. Miss  Louise  Janin,  the  daughter  of  Mrs. 
Harry  Mendell,  and  Miss  Louise  Brice,  a  grand- 
daughter of  the  house  of  Tallant,  have  been  an- 
nounced but  beyond  these  little  has  been  said  of 
the  buds  of  1912.  Added  to  the  two  named,  how- 
ever is  Miss  Katie-bell  McGregor  who  has  just 
won  her  sheepskin  at  Vassar  and  will  be  formally 
presented  early  in  the  season.  FoUovi^ing  her 
graduation  she  was  entertained  in  the  East  by 
the  Schwabs  who  are  old  friends  of  the  McGre- 
gors. Her  father  John  McGregor  came  to  Cali- 
fornia a  few  years  ago  to  take  charge  of  the 
Union  Iron  Works  and  established  his  residence 
in  a  handsome  house  in  Green  street  that  will 
be  the  scene  of  many  social  functions  in  the 
future.  Another  belle  will  be  Miss  Charlotte  Tut- 
tlc  of  Colusa  who  has  been  entertained  by  Mrs. 
Tubbs.  The  Tuttles  are  New  Englanders  who 
have  been  in  California  a  comparatively  short 


time,  and  have  large  horticultural  interests  in 
Colusa  County.  Miss  Tuttic  was  educated  in  the 
East  and  while  she  has  not  made  a  formal  debut 
enjoyed  many  of  the  gayetics  of  the  younger  set 
when  she  visited  Mrs.  Tubbs  last  winter.  Miss 
Ruth  Zeile,  I  am  told,  is  contemplating  a  debut 
next  winter  when  her  favored  sister  Miss  Marian 
will  make  her  path  to  popularity  an  easy  one. 
The  Zeile  girls  spend  a  great  deal  of  their  time 
at  the  home  of  their  uncle  E.  W.  Hopkins  since 
the  death  of  their  father,  while  their  stepmother 
occupies  an  apartment  in  Van  Ness  avenue. 
Should  the  younger  sister  decide  to  come  out 
she  will  be  entertained  by  her  cousins,  the 
Mesdames  Taylor  and  McNear.  ' 


Wedding  Podsnappery 

Not  .since  my  dear  old  friend  Charles  Dickens 
let  me  into  the  secrets  of  Podsnap  grandeur  at 
that  celebrated  dinner  where  every  bit  of  table 
ware  was  solid  gold  and  looked  it,  have  I  been 
so  delighted  as  I  was  when  I  picked  up  the  morn- 
ing paper  and  read  the  itemized  bill  for  the 
Crocker-Whitman  wedding.  It  is  a  great  thing 
to  be  initiated  into  the  ruysteries  of  expenditures 
made  by  millionaires.  Reading  that  account  item 
by  item  1  felt  much  the  same  thrill  which  would 
come,  I  have  no  doubt,  if  I  got  the  chance  to 
peep  over  Miss  Crocker's  shoulder  while  she  was 
balancing  her  check  book.  It  seems  eminently 
fitting  that  a  wedding  which  is  to  have  the 
musical  accompaniment  of  unreeling  picture  films 
should  be  exploited  in  public  to  the  last  Lincoln 
penny.  But  at  that,  the  items  arc  not  exhaustive. 
Strangely  enough,  the  bill  for  the  moving  pictures 
has  not  been  included  in  the  statement.  Is  it 
possible  that  some  enterprising  concern  is  to 
donate  the  films  and  the  operators  in  exchange 
for  the  privilege  of  exhibiting  the  pictures  in  the 
nickelodeons?  Then  too,  I  note  items  which 
arouse  my  curiosity.  The  dinner  to  the  grooms- 
men is  to  cost  a  paltry  $500  while  the  wedding 
breakfast  will  eat  up  a  cool  $3,000.    Now  this 


MANZANITA  HALL 

PALO  ALTO.  CALIFORNIA 
Makes  a  specialty  of  preparing  boys  and  young 
men  for  entrance  to  the  universities.  The  location 
adjacent  to  Stanford  I'nivcrsity  and  to  Palo  Alto, 
a  town  of  remarkable  culture,  makes  possible  a  school 
life  of  unusual  advantages  and  privileges. 

Twentieth    year    opens     August     27,     1912.  For 
catalogue  and  specific  information,  address 
W.  A.  SHEDD,  Head  Master 


Puckett's  College  of  Dancing 

Assembly  Hall 


1268  SUTTER  STREET 

between  V«n  New  and  Polk 

Jl  ^ore  beautiful  ballroom 
Could    Hardly  Conceived 


Classes — Mondays.  .Assemblies — Fridays 

Advance  Class  and  Social— Wednesdays. 

PriTate  Leitona 

Hall  for  Rent  Phone  Franklin  118 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


seems  unfair.  The  groomsmen  cannot  conceiv- 
ably have  a  very  good  time  when  they  are  tub- 
ject  to  the  restraining  influence  of  the  entire 
wedding  party.  So  why  not  spend  a  little  more 
money  and  give  them  the  blow-out  of  their  lives. 
$300!  That  wouldn't  buy  enough  wine  to  inspire 
one  of  them  with  a  wedding  epigram.  Why,  they 
are  even  going  to  spend  more  money  on  secret 
service  men.  Decidedly,  the  groomsmen  are  to 
be  shabbily  treated. 


Her  Gilded  Majority 

Mrs.  Christian  de  Guigne  Jr.  comes  of  age  next 
month.  Nothing  inherently  remarkable  about  a 
girl  coming  of  age.  But  there  are  comings-of-age 
and  comings-of-age.  It  happens  that  when  Mrs. 
Christian  de  Guigne  Jr.  comes  of  age  she  will 
come  into  a  tidy  plum  of  three  millions.  That 
makes  her  majority,  her  gilded  majority,  stand 
out  for  tlic  awed  attention  of  the  proletariat. 
The  money  comes  to  her  from  her  grandfather. 
Felton  Elkins  came  of  age  some  time  ago  and  got 
his  plum.  Now  his  sister's  turn  is  at  hand. 
Everybody  knows,  of  course,  that  youthful  Mrs. 
de  Guigne  was  Marie  Louise  Elkins.  Felton  has 
been  spending  his  money  pretty  freely.  I  wonder 
if  Marie  Louise  will  follow  suit?  Perhaps  not. 
There  are  fewer  free  spenders  among  our  gilded 
girls  than  among  our  golden  boys. 


Is  He  Still  Heart-Whole? 

Speaking  of  Felton  Elkins,  is  he  to  be  added  in 
the  near  future  to  the  list  of  Benedicks?  They 
are  saying  about  the  tea  tables  and  in  other  places 
where  gossip  is  not  disdained  that  Felton  Elkins 
is  enamored  of  Josephine  Parrott  who  went  to 
Paris  recently.  He  used  to  lend  her  his  big  tour- 
ing car  until  she  smashed  into  the  depot  at  Bur- 
lingame  one  day  and  got  her  name  in  the  papers. 
It  is  whispered  that  he  entrusted  her  with  more 
than  his  touring  car — that  he  gave  her  his  heart, 
to  use  the  language  beloved  of  bavardage. 
Whether  she  still  has  it  I  don't  know.  No  doubt 
if  she  has  she  will  be  more  careful  of  it  than  she 
was  of  the  motor  car.  Still,  a  man's  heart  is 
harder  to  control  than  a  steering  wheel.  But 
maybe  Felton  Elkins  still  has  his  heart.  There's 
no  denying  that  during  his  recent  stay  at  the  Von 
Schroeder  place  in  San  Luis  Obispo  he  was 
quite  attentive  to  another  charming  girl  wlidse 
name  is  not  Josephine  Parrott. 


Lord  Curzon  and  Hearst 

Lord  Curzon  of  Kedleston  got  ahead  of 
William  Randolph  Hearst  the  other  day.  Not  in 
a  very  great  matter  perhaps,  for  it  only  concerned 
a  fireplace.  An  old  fireplace  at  that — some  three 
or  four  hundred  years  old.  But  Hearst's  heart 
was  set  on  that  ancient  fireplace.  He  was  crazy 
to  get  it.  Wanted  to  set  up  his  modern  house- 
hold gods  on  its  antiquated  shelf,  no  doubt.  The 
great  publicist  was  cheated  of  his  desire.  Lord 
Curzon  captured  the  fireplace.  The  fireplace  be- 
longed to  Tattershall  Castle  in  Lincolnshire, 
England.  The  castle,  like  a  lot  of  other  castles 
of  Merrie  England,  had  fallen  on  evil  days.  It 
was  more  or  less  dismantled.  Among  other 
pieces  of  furniture  the  fireplace  was  sent  up  to 
Christie's  in  London  to  be  sold  to  the  highest 
American  bidder  (American  bidders  always  be- 
ing the  highest).  But  it  happened  that  Lord 
Curzon  bought  Tattershall.  He  could  buy  it,  for 
the  same  reason  that  other  English  peers  have 
been  able  to  buy  and  rehabilitate  old  castles. 
Curzon  has  oodles  of  American  money — has  had 
ever  since  his  alliance  with  the  late  lamented 
Mary  of  the  Chicago  house  of  Leiter.  But  Lord 
Curzon  didn't  want  to  have  a  castle  without  a 
fireplace.  He  sent  posthaste  to  London  and 
bought  back  the  old  fireplace.  He  got  it  just 
in  time,  for  an  agent  of  Hearst  was  even  then 


dickering  for  it.  Lord  Curzon  warms  his  aristo- 
cratic feet  before  the  old  fireplace  and  is  happy. 
Hearst  is  not  happy — won't  be  till  he  finds  one 
from  a  castle  as  old  as  Tattershall. 


A  Provincial  Town 

It  must  gall  Mrs.  Frank  Carolan,  citizen  of 
cosmopolis  that  she  is,  to  note  how  provincial 
her  home  town  of  Chicago  can  be.  Here  is 
Chicago  going  to  pieces,  so  to  speak,  because  Mrs. 
Atherton  smoked  a  cigarette  in  public.  Think  of 
it!  A  reporter  actually  hunted  up  Mrs.  Atherton 
to  ask  her:  "Is  it  true  that  you  smoked  a 
cigarette  last  Monday  night  at  the  South  Shore 
Country  Club?"  Her  reply  was  a  rebuke  to 
Chicago  provincialism.  "A  cigarette?  Bless  me, 
I  suppose  I  smoked  several."    No  San  Francisco 


MISS    M.\RY  MEARES 

The  only  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  I..  Meares. 
formerly  of  this  city  but  now  of  Seattle.  Her  en- 
gagement to  Lieutenant  William  Kirk  Scammell  of  the 
navy  was  announced  recently. 

reporter  would  think  of  pursuing  Gertrude 
Atherton  or  any  other  woman  of  prominence  to 
ask  such  a  silly  question.  If  our  women  want 
to  smoke  they  smoke,  and  there  are  no  gaping  re- 
porters to  be  bewildered  at  the  incident.  We've 
been  used  to  our  women  smoking  for  ever  so 
long.  Not  so  Chicago,  provincial  little  Chicago. 
Surely  Chicago  can't  even  keep  up  its  light  sum- 
mer reading.  In  all  the  novels  of  the  day  the 
heroines  smoke  nonchalantly. 


A  Seaside  Drama 

Talking  of  jewels  reminds  me.  Caramel-by-the- 
sea,  as  a  sweet-toothed  gossip  of  my  acquaint- 
ance calls  our  beautiful  manufacturing  town  of 
literary  brummagems,  seems  to  be  experiencing 
the  sweet  uses  of  adversity,  which,  like  The  Toad, 
ugly  and  venomous,  wears  yet  a  precious  jewel 
in  his  head.  Now,  to  do  The  Toad  belated  poetic 
justice  in  the  light  of  modern  science  and  higher 
criticism,  it  is  not  venomous,  neither  hath  it  a 
precious  jewel  in  its  head.  Rumors  are  rife  of 
war,  plagiarism  and  toadyism,  but  we  are  left  in 
Egyptian  darkness  as  to  the  true  casus  belli. 
Jimmy  Hopper  ought  to  have  written  The  Toad, 
but  left  it  undone,  the  sinner.  The  present  situa- 
tion, the  true  inwardness,  of  The  Toad,  is  said 
to  be  funnier  than  that  of  The  Jumping  Frog  of 
Calaveras,  but  dry  champagne  seems  to  be  the 

Candy  Sent  to  the  Country.  A  box  of  candy 
is  always  welcomed  by  friends  in  the  country. 
Easily  sent  by  express  from  any  of  Geo.  Haas  & 
Sons'  four  candy  stores. 


Any  Victrola 

On  Easy  Terms 

Whether  you  get  the  new  low  price 
Victrola  at  $15  or  the  Victrola  "de  luxe"  at 
$200,  get  a  Victrola.  At  a  very  small  ex- 
pense you  can  enjoy  a  world  of  entertain- 
ment. Victrolas  $15  to  $200.  Any  Victrola 
on  easy  terms. 

Sherman  Ray  &  Go. 


Steinw»y  ind  Other  Pianoi  Apollo  and  Cecilian  Player  Pianot 
Victor  Talkini  Machine!    Sheet  Music  and  Muiicai  Merchandiie 


Kearny  and  Sutter  StrceU,  San  Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  StreeU,  Oakland 


1 


(  Sutter  1572 
Phones    Home  C-3970 

(Home  C-478I— Hotel 


Cyril  Aroaulou 
Henry  Rittman 
C.  Lahademe 


New  Delmonico's 

Restaurant  and  Hotel 

NOW  OPEN 

Best  French  Dinner  in  the  Cily  with  Wine,  $  1 .00 
Banquet  Halls  and  Private  Tiining  Rooms 
Music  Every  Evening 
Visi  ors  lo  San  Francisco  are  cordially  invited 

362  Geary  Street        San  Francisco 


FIOR  d'lTALIA 

RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN  DINNER  A  SPECIALTY 

The  cuisine  is  unsurpassed.    An  ideal  place 
where  one  can  take  his  family  or  friends. 
Banquet  Rooms  and  Private  Rooms 

492  BROADWAY  ::  SAN  FRANCISCO 


Phonea:  Douglas  1504 


Home  C  1504 


Art  and  Refinement  are  Display  by  Tasteful  Attire 


Phone  Douglas  4964 


Makers  of 

LADIES'   GOWNS   AND   FANCY  COSTUMES 

420  SUTTER,  rear  STOCKTON  STREET 
San  Francisco,  Cal. 


La  Questa 

One  of  Ibe  FINES!  RED  WINES 
in  the  world.  Served  at  First-Class 
Hotels,  Cafes,  Clubs,  Etc. 

Producer,  E.  H.  RIXFORD 

California-Pacific  Building,   ICS  Montgomery  St. 
San  Francisco 


"Hightowcr,  the  big  centre,  doesn't  play  with 
the  'varsity  team  this  season." 
"Hurt?" 

"No.  He's  got  a  weak  memory,  and  can't 
learn  the  rulei." 


16 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


word,  the  sayers  smile  exasperatingly  and  saw 
wood,  deaf  as  Baalpeor  to  all  prayers  of  Lighten 
our  darkness,  we  beseech  thee!  Is  the  morsel,  we 
wonder,  really  any  more  toothsome  than  the 
Caramel  wont?  If  so,  what  unheard-of  cruelty 
to  keep  it  to  themselves!  They  be  the  true  chil- 
dren of  light,  God's  chosen,  and  we  but  Phil- 
istines, we  well  know  as  they,  but  we  would  fain 
be  enlightened  as  to  what  of  divine  fire  and  what 
of  diabolic  is  at  the  bottom  of  this  pillar  of  smoke 
by  day  and  burning  gusher  of  midnight  oil  by 
night;  as  to  what  way  the  Toad  jumps,  and  why, 
whether  of  creative  rank  or  rank  imitation. 


The  Spreckels  Home 

The  new  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Adolph 
Spreckels  is  to  be  an  elaborate  study  in  decora- 
tive effects.  The  best  schools  are  to  be  beauti- 
fully represented  in  the  ornamental  eflfects  con- 
trived for  the  various  rooms.  Thus,  the  mag- 
nificent entrance  hall  and  the  library  will  be  of 
the  daintiest  Georgian;  the  dining  room  will  be 
Marie  Antoinette;  the  guest  chambers  will  be 
purest  Adam;  and  there  is  to  be  a  splendid  Pom- 
peian  court..  Those  who  are  invited  to  inspect 
the  completed  domicile  must  brush  up  their  learn- 
ing if  they  wish  to  exhibit  the  proper  degree  of 
intelligent  appreciation. 


Fair  Ones  Admitted 

The  Olympic  Club  has  introduced  an  innovation 
in  the  Sunday  night  dinners  at  which  women  are 
permitted  to  be  present,  and  it  promises  to  be 
popular  with  the  wives  and  sweethearts  of  mem- 
bers who  gathered  in  large  numbers  last  Sun- 
day night.  The  big  dining  room  of  the  club  pre- 
sented an  unusual  appearance  and  the  ladies 
greatly  enjoyed  the  occasion  which  is  to  be  re- 
peated weekly.  The  Olympic  is  the  first  local 
club  to  allow  women  in  the  main  dining  room  and 
the  Sunday  night  privilege  could  be  extended  to 
other  clubs  with,  I  am  sure,  equally  successful 
results.  A  number  of  years  ago  the  Uni- 
versity Club  maintained  a  Ladies'  dining  room. 
A  separate  entrance  to  the  basement  of 
the  building  where  it  was  located  prevented  any 
encroachment  on  the  domain  of  the  members. 
The  Olympians  in  extending  to  their  fair  guests 
the  freedom  of  the  dining  and  reception  rooms 
once  a  week,  have  established  a  precedent. 


The  Fays  in  Germany 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paul  Fay  who  are  spending  their 
honeymoon  in  Europe  have  been  enjoying  the 
sights  of  Paris  but  are  now  in  Germany  where 
they  are  visiting  the  former's  sister  Maud  Fay 
who  has  been  singing  in  Munich  this  season. 
The  gifted  California  girl  is  hailed  as  one  of 
the  operatic  stars  of  Europe.  Mrs.  Paul 
Fay  who  was  pretty  Katherine  Oliver  be- 
fore her  recent  marriage  is  a  great  favorite 
with  her  talented  sister-in-law  who  has  been  an- 
ticipating this  visit  of  the  young  couple.  The 
two  families  are  intimate  and  Miss  Fay  was  en- 
tertained by  the  Olivers  on  the  occasion  of  her 
last  visit  to  San  Francisco. 


The  Charm  of  Tait's 

"Tell  me  where  you  eat  and  I  will  tell  you 
what  you  are"  is  paraphrasing  an  old  saying.  It 
also  expresses  local  sentiment  on  the  subject  of 
dining  out.  Where  you  dine  in  San  Francisco  is 
just  as  important  as  where  you  shop,  where  you 
live.  Each  expresses  your  taste  and  your  taste 
indicates  where  you  "belong."  Of  course  there 
is  always  the  quiet  retreat  to  be  considered 
where  one  can  dine  in  seclusion  and  take  pleasure 
in  being  "diflferent,"  but  continued  pilgrimages 
to  such  places  soon  turn  the  unique  into  the 
ordinary.  It's  human  nature  to  want  to  be  on  the 
"firing  line" — where  things  happen  fast  and 
furious;  and  it  seems  that  the  San  Francisco  pub- 


lic has  made  Tait's  the  "firing  line"  of  its  dining 
"engagements."  ■  This  popular  cafe  is  always 
crowded  and  every  face  you  see  there  is  beaming, 
expectant.  That  "bored  look"  so  peculiar  to  the 
habitual  diner-out  is  never  seen.  And  the  sea- 
soned diner-out  constitutes  a  large  percentage  of 
the  establishment's  patronage.  I  overheard  the 
following  fragments  of  a  conversation  there  last 
night:  "Say,  Bob,  what  makes  you  always  come 
here;  why  do  you  like  the  place?"  "Blamed  if  I 
know,  Bess,"  the  man  answered;  "ask  me  why 
I  like  one  book,  one  painting,  or  one  piece  of 
music  better  than  another.  Guess  the  charm  of 
the  place,  while  hard  to  define,  is  on  the  same 
key  with  my  temperament.  Whenever  I  leave 
home  to  dine  out,  my  feet  naturally  point  this 
way,  and  by  the  crowd  I  see  here  every  time  I 
come,  I  guess  I'm  not  the  only  one  who  lik^s  the 
place."  And  there  really  is  a  charm  about  Tait's. 
You  feel  you're  one  of  a  number  of  babes  in  Toy- 
land,  and  you  therefore  proceed  to  enjoy  yourself 
according  to  your  most  impulsive  whim  and 
fancy.  And  you  prove  to  yourself  that  you  did 
have  a  good  time  by  coming  again. 


In  the  Social  Spotlight 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  P.  Giannini  and  family  and 
Mrs.  and  Miss  Scatena,  of  San  Francisco,  who 
have  been  automobiling  in  Italy  and  the  South 
of  France  for  several  months,  have  arrived  in 
Paris,  says  the  Paris  edition  of  the  New  York 
Herald.  Mr.  Giannini,  who  is  vice-president  and 
manager  of  the  Bank  of  Italy,  in  San  Francisco, 
has  left  again  for  a  fortnight's  trip  to  Tripoli. 
His  family  will  remain  in  Paris  pending  his  re- 
turn. 

Judge  Thomas  F.  Graham,  Mrs.  Graham  and 
Miss  Ethel  Graham  are  going  to  spend  their  vaca- 
tion in  Shasta  County. 

Leo  Alexander  and  Michael  Alexander  will 
spend  a  short  vacation  at  Yellowstone  Park. 

Dr.  and  Mrs.  Pedar  S.  Bruguiere  and  their  lit- 
tle daughter  are  at  Del  Monte  for  a  few  weeks. 

Miss  Virginia  Walsh  has  been  at  .'\etna  Springs 
with  her  aunts  Mrs.  C.  P.  Overton  and  Mrs. 
Edgar  A.  Jones. 


Western  Pacific 
Railway 

THE  FEATHER  RIVER  ROUTE 


Daily  Limited  Trains  to  Salt  Lake  City,  Den- 
ver, Omaha,  Kansas  City,  Saint  Louis,  Chicago 
and  all  points  East,  passing  through  the  beauti- 
ful canyon  of  the  Feather  River. 
Latest  types  of  Steel  Coaches,  Dining,  Obser- 
vation, Standard  and  Tourist  Sleeping-Cars. 

EQUIPMENT  ABSOLUTELY  NEW 
ELECTRIC  LIGHTED  THROUGHOUT 

SERVICE  UNEXCELLED 
INCOMPARABLE  SCENIC  SPLENDOR 

For  Full  Information  Address 
Any  Western  Pacific  Agent  or 

TICKET  OFFICES: 
665  Market  Street,  Palace  Hotel 

Phone  Sutter  1651 

Market  Street  Ferry  Depot 

Phone    Kearny  4980 

1325  Broadway,  Oakland 

Phone  Oakland  132 


-Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  Shilling  and  Miss  Shilling 
motored  down  from  Mr.  Shilling's  home  at  Wood- 
side  to  enjoy  a  few  days  rest  and  recreation  at 
Casa  del  Rey.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  W.  H.  Westphal 
have  taken  apartments  at  the  Casa  Del  Rey  for 
the  summer.  J.  W.  Chapman,  William  A.  Lange, 
and  N.  A.  Stringer,  well  known  San  Francisco 
club  men,  motored  down  in  Mr.  Lange's  Winton 
for  the  week  end.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  C.  M.  Dor- 
oughtey  are  at  Casa  Del  Rey  for  the  summer. 
Mr.  Doroughtey  is  a  well  known  rancher  and 
land  owner  at  Pleasanton. 


Los  Angeles 


$25  Round  Trip 


San  Diego  $29  Round  Trip 

Tickets  on  sale  daily 

Good  for  return  until  October  31,  1912 

Santa  Fe's  new  train 


Angel 


Leaves  San  Francisco 
daily  at  4:00  p.  m. 
This  is  California's 
finest  train 


On  the  return  trip  the  Saint  offers 
the  same  superior  service. 

Phone  or  call  on  me  for  reservations. 

Jas.  B.  Duffy,  Gen.  Agt.,  673  Market  St., 
Cisco.    Phone:  Kearny  315  and  J  3371. 


San  Fran- 


J.  J. 

Phone : 


Warner,  Gen.  Agt.,  1218  Broadway,  Oakland. 
Oakland  425   and   A  4425. 


Santa  Fe 


Santa  Cruz 

"The  Atlantic  City  of  the  Pacific  Coast" 

IS  PLANNING  A 

Wonderful  Water 
Pageant 

For  the  Following  Dates: 

July  20th  to  July  28th 

(Inclusive) 

Yacht  Regattas — Motor  Boat  Races — Review  of 
American  Battleships — Parade  of  Decorated 
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July  13.  1912  TOWNTALK  17 

Showman  and  Playwright 

By  Theodore  Bonnet 


David  Belasco  would  rather  be  celebrated  for 
his  ability  as  a  playwright  than  for  anything  else, 
but  however  kindly  disposed  criticism  may  be  it 
halts  at  the  task  of  paying  the  tribute  most  de- 
sired. This  is  a  trick  that  Fortune  is  pleased  to 
play  with  its  darlings.  It  endows  them  at  once 
with  genius  and  futile  aspirations.  David  Bel- 
asco is  a  playwright  only  incidentally.  He  is 
above  all  things  a  showman — perhaps  the  most 
artistic  showman  the  world  has  ever  seen.  In- 
deed to  him  may  be  given  the  credit  of  having 
raised  the  science  of  stage  management  to  the 
dignity  of  a  fine  art.  Before  him  there  was 
Henry  Irving  who  did  much  with  the  gas-jet,  the 
painted  scene  and  with  "properties"  to  create 
illusion  suitable  to  the  action  of  the  play,  but 
Irving  never  handled  the  tools  of  his  trade  with 
the  facility  with  which  Belasco  starts  emotion 
and  piques  the  imagination.    Belasco  has  lifted 


the  art  of  stage  illusion  into  the  very  realm  of 
intellectual  endeavor.  To  call  him  artist  is  not 
to  abuse  the  word.  He  certainly  has  command 
over  the  senses  of  his  audience,  as  you  may  learn 
at  the  Orpheum,  where,  through  the  medium  of 
Madame  Butterfly  he  is  giving  a  liberal  educa- 
tion in  the  science  of  the  stage.  The  drama  it- 
self is  unadulterated  theatricalism,  but  the  art  of 
the  stage  manager,  or  if  you  will,  the  skill  of 
the  great  intellectual  and  spiritual  machinist 
makes  it  palpitant  with  a  tender  melancholy,  in- 
vests it  with  a  profound  fantasy  and  strange 
poetry.  This  in  a  large  measure  is  a  case  of 
capturing  the  imagination  by  mechanism;  by 
lights  and  shades,  by  an  atmosphere  in  which  the 
piece  has  been  steeped  by  wizard  hand.  It  is 
none  the  less  an  example  of  the  art  of  a  crafts- 
man of  keen  imagination,  with  the  delineative 
power  of  a  painter,  and  with  an  immense  and 


vivid  instinct  of  the  picturesque.  The  subtlety 
of  the  thing  is  all  the  more  remarkable  because 
of  its  insubstantiality.  It  is  more  poignant  in 
its  decorative  silences  than  in  its  iterations.  If 
Madame  Butterfly  would  not  so  often  remark  that 
she  was  waiting  till  the  robins  nest  again  the 
theatricality  of  the  little  drama  would  be  less 
obtrusive.  But  it  is  the  delight  of  Belasco  the 
playwright  to  wallow  in  his  material.  He  is  al- 
ways striving  for  eflPect,  with  the  result  that  he 
makes  elaboration  obvious.  If  he  would  only  be 
a  little  more  economical  with  his  inventions  his 
plays  would  be  less  striking  in  their  insincerity. 
It  is  too  bad  that  the  anecdotist  in  color  and 
light  who  has  attained  a  degree  of  perfection 
beyond  which  it  would  seem  impossible  to  go, 
does  not  refrain  when  play-writing  from  over- 
emphasis by  means  of  incident  and  utterance. 


A  Surprise  from  Chicago 

I  didn't  know  anything  as  good  as  Louisiana 
Lou  cvrr  came  out  of  Chicago — the  city  of  dread- 
ful abattoirs  and  excellent  canned  goods.  Hav- 
ing seen  the  charming  musical  comedy,  Chicago 
has  risen  in  my  estimation.  Barney  Bernard  is 
the  star  of  a  very  good  show.  Pretty  music, 
bright  lines,  pretty  girls,  stylish  clothes,  beautiful 
scenery — everything  that  makes  for  a  delightful 
evening  at  the  theatre.  The  old-time  favorite  of 
Fischers,  Barney  the  Yiddisher,  has  improved 
wonderfully.  He  always  had  something  of  mag- 
netism and  he  had  few  peers  as  a  portrayer  of 
the  popular  conception  of  the  Ghetto  type.  His 
present  role  suits  him  perfectly.  The  long, 
strong  applause  he  receives  nightly  must  make 
him  very  happy  if  he  likes  it  as  much  as  his 
audiences  like  him.  Sophie  Tucker  coon  shouts 
and  acts  "funny"  and  dresses  stunningly.  Bessie 
de  Voie,  a  pretty  girl  with  a  fascinating  way  of 
walking  about  and  a  darling  coiffure,  dances  well, 
and  Eleanor  Henry,  Mortimer  Gelden,  Lester 
Crawford  and  Robert  O'Connor  are  all  bright, 
nimble  and  tuneful.  But  notwithstanding  the 
capabilities  of  these  folks  there  is  one  obscure 
person  in  the  company  who  stands  out  con- 
spicuovsly.  He  is  only  a  "chorus  boy."  He  has 
the  best  voice  in  the  company.  You  can  hear  him 
distinctly  above  the  rest,  especially  in  the  stein 
song.  He  is  also  an  exceptionally  clever  dancer, 
and  he  is  always  in  the  picture  and  in  the  spirit 
of  it,  availing  himself  of  very  meagre  opportun- 
ity to  prove  that  he  has  both  talent  and  tempera- 
ment. In  the  last  act  he  stands  by  the  tree  in 
the  foreground.  Some  day  that  boy  will  be  a 
fixture  right  in  the  center  of  the  stage. 

— H.  M.  B. 


James  K.  Hackett  Coming 

James  K.  Hackett  and  the  splendid  organization 
which  will  assist  him  in  the  presentation  of  his 
plays  at  the  Columbia  leave  New  York  for  San 
Francisco  on  Friday,  July  12.  The  trip  will  be 
made  without  a  stopover.  The  company  will  ar- 
rive on  Wednesday,  preceding  the  opening  date 
of  Monday  night,  July  21.  During  the  New  Work 
engagement  of  Mr.  Hackett  his  offering  "The 
Grain  of  Dust"  received  the  endorsement  of  both 
press  and  public.  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  was 
made  for  Mr.  Hackett's  use  from  David  Graham 


Gossip  of  the  TTieatre 

Phillips'  novel  of  the  same  name,  and  it  is  said 
to  be  one  oi  the  most  forceful  dramas  produced 
in  late  years.    Of  special  interest  to  the  theater- 


MAY  TULLY 

Wlio  will  appear  in  the  Reno,  Nevada,  divorce  sketch 
"The  liattle  Cry  of  Freedom"  this  Sunday  matinee 
at   the  Orpheum. 

goers  of  San  Francisco  is  the  list  of  players  com- 
ing here  with  Mr.  Hackett.    Included  in  the  cast 


are  E.  M.  Holland,  Mrs.  Thomas  Whiffen,  Frazer 
Coulter,  Frank  Burbeck,  Eva  Vincent,  Vaughn 
Trevor,  Luke  Martin,  Beatrice  Beckley  and 
Oliver  Oliver.  "Louisiana  Lou"  at  the  Colum- 
bia is  at  the  full  tide  of  success.  The  engage- 
ment has  another  week  to  run.  The  last  per- 
formance will  be  the  matinee  and  evening  per- 
formances of  Saturday,  July  20.  There  will  be 
the  regular  bargain  matinee  on  Wednesday. 


Bessie  Barriscale  as  "The  Rose" 

Bessie  Barriscale's  engagement  at  the  Alcazar, 
commencing  Monday  night  and  continuing  two 
weeks,  promises  to  be  a  most  popular  one,  for 
the  advance  demand  for  seats  is  unprecedentedly 
strong.  While  this  is  sterling  proof  of  Miss 
Barriscale's  artistic  worth  and  personal  popular- 
ity, the  fame  of  her  opening  vehicle,  "The  Rose 
of  the  Rancho"  must  also  be  given  some  of  the 
credit.  Indeed,  the  local  reputation  of  the  actress 
and  the  play  are  to  some  extent  interdependent, 
as  she  is  the  only  person  who  has  interpreted  the 
title  role  in  San  Francisco.  Her  first  appearance 
under  Belasco  &  Mayer's  management  was  as 
Juanita,  and  the  hit  she  scored  was  responsible 
for  her  retention  as  the  Alcazar's  ingenue 
throughout  three  seasons.  Since  then  she  has 
ascended  to  stardom,  having  been  engaged  to 
lead  in  a  high-price  production  next  September 
on  Broadway.  David  Belasco  and  Richard  Wal- 
ton Tully  constructed  "The  Rose  of  the  Rancho." 
It  depicts  California  life  during  the  late  fifties, 
when  land-hungry  Americans  were  dispossessing 
the  Spaniards  who  had  held  the  soil  for  centuries 
— when  Spanish  pride,  resentment,  passion  and 
inertia  were  pitted  against  business  shrewdness 
and  activity.  The  scene  of  the  play  is  a  rancho 
near  the  Mission  of  San  Juan  Bauista,  with  none 
but  three  generations  of  women  to  defend  it 
against  the  "Gringo"  invaders.  "The  Rose  of 
the  Rancho"  will  be  presented  during  one  week 
only,  as  "Smith,"  a  delicious  English  comedy  in 
which  Miss  Barriscale  made  her  greatest  recent 
success,  is  to  be  the  medium  of  her  farewell  ap- 
pearances. 


All  Tastes  Suited  at  the  Orpheum 

"The  Battle  Cry  of  F'reedom,"  a  breezy  satire 
on  Reno  divorces  will  be  presented  next  week 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


at  the  Orphcum  by  May  Tully  who  will  be 
pleasantly  recalled  for  her  sketch  "Stop,  Look  and 
Listen."  The  piece  was  written  by  Miss  Tully  and 
Bozeman  Bulger,  the  well-known  sporting  writer 
and  co-author  of  "Curves,"  the  baseball  skit.  The 
playlet  has  bright  lines  and  exhibits  Miss  Tully 
at  her  best.  The  Kaufman  Brothers  Jack  and 
Phil,  will  amuse  with  their  tuneful  originalities. 
These  black-face  comedians  are  among  the  best 
in  their  class.  Harry  Atkinson,  the  .Australian 
Orpheus,  will  present  his  monologue  of  nursery 
rhymes  and  his  imitations  of  musical  instruments. 
The  act  to  be  presented  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Elliott 
next  week  is  decidedly  out  of  the  ordinary.  These 
two  gifted  artists  arc  virtuosi  on  that  most  dif- 


ficult instrument,  the  harp  on  which  they  play 
everything  from  grand  opera  to  ragtime.  They 
are  also  vocalists  of  merit.  Next  week  will  con- 
clude the  engagements  of  Ray  L.  Royce  in  his 
eccentric  character  impersonations;  the  O'Mcers 
Sisters  and  Company,  and  Honors  and  Le  Prince. 
It  will  also  be  the  last  of  David  Belasco's  superb 
production  of  "Madame  Butterfly." 


The  African  Films  at  the  Cort 

That  the  motion  pictures  of  the  Paul  J.  Rainey 
African  Hunt  have  lived  up  to  their  advance  no- 
tices is  proved  by  the  capacity  houses  which  have 
been  the  rule  at  the  Cort  ever  since  last  Sunday. 
They  were  acclaimed  the  "most  marvelous  mo- 


tion pictures  ever  taken,"  and  that  this  statement 
is  true  has  been  conceded  by  the  entire  local 
press  as  well  as  by  the  patrons  of  the  Cort.  The 
pictures  start  on  the  second  and  tinal  week  of 
their  engagement  tomorrow.  These  films  repre- 
sent an  expenditure  of  a  quarter  of  a  million  dol- 
lars as  well  as  years  of  effort  and  research.  An 
expedition  of  350  men.  under  the  direction  of 
Mr.  Rainey.  spent  a  year  in  the  wilds  of  .\frica 
and  braved  death  from  fever  and  wild  beasts  in 
order  that  science  might  be  enriched.  Mr.  Rainey 
who  is  a  millionaire  sportsman  of  Cleveland,  un- 
dertook his  first  .-\frican  big  game  hunt  purely 
for  sport,  but  he  eventually  came  to  hunt  for  the 
camera  and  not  for  fun.    The  result  is  that  he 


has  done  much  for  such  institutions  as  the  Smith- 
sonian Institute  and  the  .American  Geographic 
Society.  The  London  Zoological  Gardens  and 
the  Bronx  Zoo,  of  New  York,  are  also  consider- 
ably in  his  debt.  An  illuminative  lecture  is  given 
which  adds  much  to  the  entertainment.  Matinees 
are  given  daily  in  addition  to  the  evening  per- 
formances. On  Sunday  night,  July  21,  comes  the 
New  York  Casino  star  cast  in  a  four  weeks'  sea- 
son of  revivals  of  the  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  comic 
operas. 


Pantages  Offers  Novelties 

The  diversified  bill  at  Pantages  is  serving  to 
crowd  the  popular  vaudeville  house  to  the  doors 


these  afternoons  and  evenings.  On  Sunday  there 
will  be  the  usual  complete  change  of  program  and 
as  a  distinct  novelty  the  moving  pictures,  in  their 
entirety,  of  the  Wolgast-Rivers  fight  will  be 
shown.  Every  incident  in  the  thirteen  exciting 
rounds,  including  the  sensational  knockout  which 
has  created  so  much  talk  and  dispute  in  the  pugil- 
istic world,  will  be  faithfully  portrayed  and  every- 
one will  have  an  opportunity  of  judging  for  him- 
self as  to  the  justice  of  Referee  Welsh's  decision. 
The  vaudeville  portion  of  the  entertainment  will 
be  up  to  the  usual  high-class  Pantages  standard. 
"A  Night  in  the  Edelweiss,"  a  miniature  musical 
comedy  presented  by  Howland,  Lane  and  their 
company  of  ten  musical  comedians,  heads  the  at- 
tractions. Carl  Rosine,  European  magician,  as- 
sisted by  Marguerite  Rosine,  will  present  a 
mysterious  act  in  a  special  setting.  The  Romano 
brothers,  exponents  of  physical  culture  and 
Grecian  art,  will  offer  a  posing  exhibition.  Docsch 
and  Zilbauer,  Viennese  street  musicians,  will  offer 
a  musical  specialty.  Bond  Morse,  "the  man  from 
nowhere,"  will  appear  in  a  tramp  monologue  and 
an  eccentric  dance.  Clark  and  Verdi,  the  Italian 
comedians  who  made  a  hit  here  the  early  part  of 
the  year,  will  return  in  their  original  act  which 
has  been  impruved  upon. 


A  Rhapsody  on  Pavlova 

London  critics  are  quite  capable  at  times  f>f 
"going  off  their  heads,"  as  the  Londoners  say. 
They  rise  to  the  vertiginous  heights  of  panegyric 
with  the  same  ease  as  provincial  play-weighers. 
They  arc  not  ashamed  to  be  carried  away  by  their 
emotions.  Just  now  it  is  the  fashion  in  London 
Town  to  throw  ecstatic  fits  about  Pavlova's  danc- 
ing. But  some  of  the  critics  throw  their  fits  ac- 
cording to  rule  of  thumb.  For  instance,  here  is 
a  carefully  calculated  fit  which  was  thrown  by 
the  critic  of  the  London  Telegraph: 

"You  may  as  well  try  to  describe  sunlight  as 
dancing.  The  charm  of  both  is  something  which 
will  not  go  into  words.  A  thermometer  is  as 
capable  of  expressing  what  light  is  like  as  the 
most  careful  description  of  preserving  the  beauty 
in  a  dance.  If  you  like  to  be  pedantic  you  may 
talk  aesthetics  and  analyze  your  sensations,  so 
much  for  color,  so  much  for  music.  But  all  this, 
even  if  you  have  the  luck  to  make  it  interesting, 
will  tell  nothing  of  the  dance  itself.  That  is,  if 
the  dancer  was  an  artist.  The  dancing  which  is 
not  art  can  be  described  easily  enough.  More 
easily  described  than  endured.  If  it  is  an  athletic 
display,  if  it  is  acrobatics  masquerading  under  an- 
other name,  if  it  is  an  imholy  mixture  of  sinuosity 
and  ferocity,  if  it  is  grovelling  upon  the  ground 
which  claims  interest  as  the  effect  of  something 
quite  nasty,  then  a  phrase  will  deal  with  it 
adequately,  and  one  glimpse  of  it  suffice  for  those 
who  know  what  dancing  can  be.  Of  all  these 
eccentricities  wc  have  enough,  and  as  there  will 
always  be  many  people  who  want  to  see  how 
queer  their  species  can  look,  such  performances 
will  never  lack  an  audience.  But  the  best  of 
dancing  ranks  with  the  other  arts  in  its  beauty 
and  its  power  over  the  emotions.  Just  as  music 
can  give  an  ctat  d'ame  which  is  not  in  the  power 
of  painting,  and  the  painter  express  a  landscape  in 
a  fashion  beyond  the  poet's  reach,  so  dancing 
has  its  own  mission.  That  is  the  ultimate  reason 
why  description  cannot  describe  it.  No  one  ever 
thought  that  Ruskin  put  all  of  Turner  into  words. 
No  one  ever  expected  a  painter  to  show  us  the 
agony  of  Lear.  The  dancer,  of  course,  calls  the 
aid  of  the  other  arts  to  her  finest  work.  Music 
and  a  fine  scheme  of  color  are  needed  for  the 
thrill  of  Pavlova's  Bacchanale.  But  the  dance  is 
itself  a  unity.  Color  and  music  are  inextricably 
mingled  with  the  dancer's  own  charm  and  mas- 
tery.   You  cannot  describe  it  except  by  similes. 


I'.M  I-  J.  R.MNEY'S  .\1-K1CAN  HUNT 

Scene  from  the  great  hunter's  expedition  which  is  l)eing  shown  in  motion  pictures  to  capacity 

audiences  at  the  Cort. 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


19 


You  may  find  it  in  the  cry  and  throb  of  one  of 
Swiiiburne's  rushing  lyrics.  It  has  the  surge  and 
laughter  of  a  spring  wind  in  sunshine.  But  the 
glowing  life  of  it  and  its  wild  excitement  are  its 
own.  Words  only  illustrate,  they  cannot  express 
its  beauty  and  its  appeal." 


A  Ray  Cox  Story 

Ray  Cox  who  was  at  the  Orpheum  recently, 
is  one  of  the  most  superstitious  individuals  you 
will  find  in  a  day's  run.  Her  knuckles  on  both 
hands  are  worn  to  the  bone  as  a  result  of  con- 
tinually knocking  on  wood  and  her  faith  in  the 
uncanny  would  do  justice  to  a  Georgia  coon.  But 
this  may  or  may  not  have  anything  to  do  with 
the  facts  in  a  story  she  told  to  a  party  of  friends 
over  a  St.  Francis  supper  table.  For  many  years 
she  numbered  among  her  acquaintances  m  the 
South  an  old  lady  of  whom  she  was  extremely 
fond.  The  old  lady  was  getting  on  in  years,  and 
like  many  old  people,  assumed  some  of  the  gay 
and  giddy  habits  of  youth  as  life's  sun  began  to 
set.  One  of  her  oddities  was  a  passion  for  a  cer- 
tain peculiar  perfume  with  which  she  loved  to 
surround  herself.  "I  can't  tell  you  what  it  was 
like,"  Miss  Cox  said,  "and  I  never  knew  anyone 
els;  who  used  it,  but  it  always  reminded  me  of 
lavender  and  old  lace,  and  I  will  always  associate 
it  in  my  mind  with  her.  While  I  was  i}n  my  way 
to  San  Francisco  1  received  a  letter  from  a 
mutual  acquaintance,  giving  a  very  good  account 
of  my  friend  whom  I  had  every  reason  to  believe 
was  in  her  usual  health.  One  night  in  a  Pull- 
man, after  I  had  fallen  asleep,  I  was  suddenly 
awakened  and  discovered  that  I  was  sitting  up- 
right fighting  for  breath  while  the  air  seemed 
heavy  with  the  odor  of  that  peculiar  perfume.  I 
opened  the  curtain  and  poked  my  head  through; 
the  air  outside  was  entirely  different,  but  when 
I  turned  my  nose  back  into  the  berth  there  was 
that  odor  again.  I  looked  at  my  watch  and  it  was 
exactly  two  o'clock.  Twenty-four  hours  later  I 
received  word  that  the  old  lady  had  died  at  that 
very  hour." 


Guests  at  Our  Hotels 

At  Casa  del  Rey 

Recent  arrivals  at  Casa  del  Rey  include:  E.  C. 
Miles  and  wife,  W.  H.  Edwards  and  wife,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  T.  H.  Beaver  and  Miss  Beaver,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  P.  F.  Kingston,  San  Francisco;  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  James  T.  Grace,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  P.  Over- 
ton, Santa  Rosa;  W.  G.  Perkins  and  Miss  Ruth 
Perkins,  Mr.  J.  M.  Masten  and  Miss  Eugenie 
Masten,  Mr.  J.  C.  McKinstry,  John  S.  Partridge, 
J.  C.  Rollifs,  Miss  K.  Crawford,  San  Francisco; 
Mrs.  B.  P.  Cook,  Berkeley;  Mrs.  B.  F.  Norse, 
James  A.  Cole,  San  Francisco;  Mrs.  C.  F.  Mac- 
Dermont,  Mr.  A.  J.  MacDermot,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Frank  Proctor,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  F.  Rossiter, 
Oakland;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  G.  Garden,  Mrs.  S. 
Gaylot,  Berkeley;  Mrs.  E.  B.  Davis  and  family, 
Mrs.  N.  S.  Rhcem  and  family,  Oakland;  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  C.  W.  Cook,  Miss  Lucy  Cook,  San  Rafael; 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  Lion,  Mr.  P.  Lion,  San  Jose; 
James  R.  McElroy  and  wife,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  O. 
McCormick,  Miss  Henry,  Mr.  J.  B.  Morehcad, 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  C.  Leavy,  Dr.  G.  Herzog,  A.  P. 
Marion,  Olive  Donavan,  Eva  Rhodes,  Mrs.  C.  M. 
Reiss,  W.  T.  Power  and  wife,  San  Francisco;  Mr. 
S.  E.  Slade,  R.  C.  Slade,  Mineral  Park;  Dr.  Mc- 
Crowe  and  wife,  San  Jose;  J.  T.  Baxter  and  wife, 
Jack  Dean,  Mrs.  G.  Ellison,  W.  G.  Knowltnn, 
Bowie  Dctrick,  S.  W.  Dcjohns,  William  Johnson, 
Mrs.  B.  Weil,  San  Francisco;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wick- 
ham  Havens,  Miss  Sallie  Havens,  Miss  Pem- 
berthy.  Piedmont;  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  C.  Newell, 
Berkeley;  Herbert  Proctor,  Walter  M.  Lemert, 
Piedmont;  Maurice  McLoughlin,  Mrs.  J.  C.  Wil- 


son and  children,  Mrs.  G.  W.  Downey  and  chil- 
dren, H.  W.  Baker,  Mrs.  Neimeyer,  Melville  H. 
Long,  Herbert  E.  Long,  R.  G.  Hunt,  San  Fran- 
cisco; Mrs.  R.  J.  Davis,  Miss  Constance  Davis, 
R.  J.  Davis,  Ross;  P.  S.  Minot,  Mrs.  George 
Wilhelm,  San  Francisco;  Mrs.  C.  A.  Belden,  Miss 
Margaret  Belden,  Ross. 


At  the  Victoria 

Mrs.  L.  L.  Blankenburg,  wife  of  Philadelphia's 
mayor,  Mrs.  George  A.  Peirsal,  Mrs.  Harry  C. 
Baden  of  Philadelphia,  Mrs.  Emmons  E.  Crocker 
of  Pittsburg,  Mrs.  S.  Blair  Lucke  of  Chester  and 
Miss  M,  L.  Dock  of  Fayetteville,  Penn.,  are  a 
party  of  Keystone  State  club  women  who  spent 
several  days  at  the  Hotel  Victoria  after  the  close 
of  the  biennial  convention  here.  Mrs.  L.  D.  Bax- 
ter of  Washington,  D.  C,  with  her  daughter,  Mrs. 
George  S.  Gillis  spent  several  days  at  the  same 
hotel  before  leaving  for  Monterey  where  Lieut. 
Gillis  and  Mrs.  Gillis  will  be  stationed  for  the 
coming  months.  Mrs.  Baxter  accompanied  the 
Gillises  to  their  new  home.  Mrs.  Henry  B.  Myers 
of  New  Orleans  and  Thomas  J.  C.  Mathewes  of 
that  city  have  been  registered  at  the  Victoria 
during  the  past  week.  Mrs.  Frank  Gray  of  Fort 
Worth,  Mrs.  H.  W.  Crawford,  Cincinnati,  E.  D. 
Buss  of  Bakersfield,  Charles  H.  Stephens  of  Cin- 
cinnati are  among  the  week's  arrivals. 


At  Castle  Crags  Farm 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  S.  Boone,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  G.  W. 
Colby,  W.  D.  Potter  and  Mrs.  Potter  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Robert  H.  Fletcher  are  San  Franciscans  who 
are  enjoying  the  July  weeks  at  Castle  Crags  Farm. 
A  Fourth  of  July  dance,  unusually  fine  fishing, 
tramping  and  riding  are  pastimes  which  have 
been  shared  by  the  guests  at  the  Farm  during  the 
past  week.  Mrs.  E.  H.  Simonson  and  Miss  Caro 
Simonson  of  Alameda,  Commander  J.  M.  Reeves, 
U.  S.  N.,  and  Mrs.  Reeves  with  their  sons,  J.  M. 
Reeves  Jr.  and  W.  C.  Reeves  are  at  the  Farm  for 
a  fortnight  or  more. 


At  Del  Monte 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Benno  Hart  and  their  two  chil- 
dren, Constance  and  Benno  Jr.,  were  among  the 
San  Franciscans  spending  a  part  of  the  holiday 
week  amid  Del  Monte's  restful  surroundings.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Abraham  Stern  and  their  son  John  are 
enjoying  their  summer  at  Del  Monte,  motoring 
with  friends.  Mr.  C.  S.  Stanton,  Cuyler  Lee, 
Knox  Maddox,  W.  Prescott  Scott,  C.  H.  Turner, 
Ernest  Folger,  Arthur  Vincent,  Vincent  Whitney 
and  H.  McDonald  Spencer  were  among  the  en- 
trants in  the  Del  Monte  tournament  of  the 
Fourth.  Mrs.  John  C.  Breckenridge  who  with  her 
father,  Mr.  S.  G.  Murphy  and  valet,  is  spending 
some  weeks  at  Del  Monte,  was  joined  this  week 
by  her  son  Master  John  C.  who  has  just  returned 
from  Paris.  Mr.  M.  E.  Pinckard  of  San  Fran- 
cisco is  spending  much  of  his  time  at  Del  Monte 
with  Mr.  Gardner  Williams,  Mrs.  W.  Mein  and 
Miss  Dorothy  Williams  of  Washington,  D.  C. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burke  Corbett,  with  Francis  and 
Charles,  motored  down  early  in  the  week.  Messrs. 
F.  M.,  Russell  and  their  father  J.  E.  Slade  went 
down  in  their  car  the  other  day  for  a  few  days 
of  golf.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alexander  Heynemann 
with  their  son  and  daughter,  Lloyd  Gibbs  and 
Rosalie  Gibbs,  have  taken  a  suite  of  rooms  for  a 
long  stay.  The  next  train  out  of  Santa  Clara 
after  the  marriage  of  Miss  Genevieve  O'Brien  and 
Earl  Harriman  Pier  bore  the  happy  couple  to- 
ward Del  Monte  where  they  spent  ten  days  of  an 
ideal  honeymoon.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Hopkins 
went  motoring  on  their  honeymoon,  but  they 
wound  up  at  Del  Monte  just  the  same.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  R.  D.  Girvin  are  there  for  the  summer. 


AMUSEMENTS 

ALCAZAR  THEATRE 

O'Farrell,  near  Powell.  Phones,  Kearny  2  and  Home  C  4455 
Monday    Evening,   July    IStli,   and   Throughout   the  Week, 

BESSIE  BARRISCALE 

Assisted  by  the  Alcazar  Company,  in  David  Belasco  and 
Richard   Walton   Tully's   Famous    Play  of 
Early  California 

THE  ROSE  OF  THE  RANCHO 

A    Magnificent    Pictorial  Production 
Prices:  Night,  25c  to  $1.00;  Matinee,  25c  to  50c. 
Matinee:   Thursday,   Saturday  and  Sunday. 

COLUMBIA  THEATRE 

The  Leading  Playhouse.    Geary  and  Mason  Stt 
Phones,  Franklin  150  and  Home  C  5783 

beginning  -Sunday  Night,  July  Uth— Third  and  Last  Week 

Ti      r      c.  Wednesdays  and  Saturdays 

Ihe   La  Salle  Theater,   Chicago  Musical   Comedy  Triumph 

"LOUISIANA  LOU" 

With   BARNEY   BERNARD,  SOl'IUE  TUCKER  and 
Many  Others 
Bargain   Matinees  Wednesday— Prices,  25c  and  $1. 
Evenings  and  Saturday  Matinees — 25c  to  $1.50. 
Monday,    July    21st— JAMES    K.    HACKETT    and  his 
Criterion  Theater,  N.  Y,  Coni/i.iny  in  '■The  Crain  of  Dust." 


Pantage's  Theatre 

Market  Street,  Opposite  Mason 

Week  of  Sunday,  July  14th 
MIRTH,  DANCE  AND  MELODY! 
"A  Night  at  the  Edelweiss,"  with  10  Musical  Comedians; 
Carl  Rosine  &  Co.,  in  Mystery  and  Magic;  Romano 
Brothers,  Physical  Culture  and  Grecian  Art;  Dolesch  and 
Zillbauer,  Viennese  Street  Musicians;  Clark  and  Verdi 
Ital  ian  Comedians;  Bond  Morse,  "Tlie  Man  from  Nowhere, 
and 

WOLGAST-RIVERS  MOVING  PICTURFS 

Matinee  Daily  at  2:30.  Nights,  7:15  and  9:15.  Sunday 
and  Holidays  Matinees  at  1:30  and  3:30.  Nights  Con- 
tinuous from  6:30.  ' 

Prices — 10c,  20c  and  30c. 


Safest  and 
Magnihc*  - 
Theatre  • 

O'f  (^RRE\-\.        SlOCVsTOVA  £r  PQVJtVV  America 


Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afternoon.  Matinee  Every  Daj 

THE  HIGHEST  STANDARD  OF  VAUDEVILLE 

••THE  BATTLE  CRY  OF  FREEDOM,"  a  one  act  comedy 
of  Divorce  Life  in  Reno,  Nev.,  introducing  M.\Y  TL'LLY 
and  her  Company;  K.'\UFM.'\N  BROTHERS  in  Tuneful 
Originalities;  HARRY  ATKINSON,  the  .\ustralian  Or- 
pheus; MR.  and  MRS.  EIXIOTT,  Harpists  and  Singers; 
RAY  L.  ROYCE;  (VM  EERS  SISTERS  &  CO.;  HONORS 
&  LE  PRINCE;  NEW  DAYLIGHT  MOTION  PIC- 
Tl'RES.  Last  Week — Immense  Success  of  D.WID  BEL- 
.\SCO'S  Superb  Production  of  ■'MADAME  BUTTERFLY." 

Evening   Prices,    10c,   25c,   50c,   75c.     Box   Seats,  $1.00. 
Matinee  Prices  (except  Sundays  and  Holidays),  10c,  25c,  50c. 
Phones,  Douglas  70  and  Home  C  1570. 


Leading  Theatre 

Ellit  and  Market 
Phone  Sutter  2460 


YOU'LL  H.WE  TO  IRIRRY 
Second   and   Last    Big   Week   Starts  Toinorrw 
Matinee   Daily  at  2:30.    Every   Night  at  8:30 

PAUL  J.  RAINEY'S 
AFRICAN  HUNT 

The  Most  Marvelous  Motion   Pictures  Ever  Taken 
Interesting  Lecture 
Prices — 25c  and  50c. 
.Sunday,  July  21st — N.   Y.  Casino  Star  Cast  in  Revivals 
of  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  Comic  Operas. 

Governess — Tommic,  -what  is  the  future  of  "I 
diagnose?" 

Physician's  child — "I  operate,"  Miss  Brown. 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


The  Financial  Outlook 


By  R.  E.  Mulcahy 


Stocks — The  only  really  important  element  of 
uncertanity  which  has  restricted  the  growth  of 
confidence  is  that  regarding  the  crop  yields. 
Granted  only  a  favorable  outcomt  of  the  hay, 
cereal  and  corn  crops  and  we  shall  have  the 
feeling  of  confidence  needed  to  insure  a  further 
forward  movement.  This  will  easily  shake  off  the 
restrictions  on  new  enterprises  exercised  by 
political  considerations.  The  opinion  prevails  in 
the  financial  community  that  the  choice  of  the 
majority  of  the  people  can  still  be  counted  upon 
to  place  the  right  sort  of  man  in  the  White 
House,  and  that  the  political  situation  should  not 
be  permitted  to  be  a  restraining  factor  in  busi- 
ness and  finance.  The  proposal  to  eliminate 
financial  influence  was  slow  at  first,  but  is  now 
favored  by  all  who  have  had  opportunity  to  study 
the  character  of  the  fundamentals  on  which  the 
business  and  financial  fabric  is  being  constructed, 
without  regard  to  politics  and  the  Presidential 
campaign.  First  and  foremost  among  these  fun- 
damentals are  the  crops.  Recent  reports  on  the 
condition  of  all  growing  vegetation  have  been 
satisfactory.  The  burden  of  advices  upon  the 
winter  wheat  is  still  that  the  harvest  will  be  much 
better  than  was  indicated  a  month  ago  by  the 
Government,  while  private  reports  on  the  spring 
wheat  conditions  state  that  the  recent  rains  in 
the  Northwest  have  improved  that  crop.  With 
the  partial  removal  of  the  political  influence,  it 
was  perceived  that  the  iron,  steel  and  copper 
metal  industries  bad  continued  to  improve,  al- 
though the  la^t  mrntioncd  suffered  a  brief  set- 
back due  to  the  operations  of  speculative  in- 
terests in  London.  Among  the  developments 
which  supplied  new  evidence  of  increasing  activ- 
ity and  profits  were  the  decrease  of  $1  a  ton  in 
prices  on  bars,  plates,  beams  and  angles,  shapes 
and  numerous  minor  steel  products,  and  the  un- 
checi:ed  buying  by  consumers  at  the  higher 
quotations.  The  market  in  the  meantime  con- 
tinues to  mark  time,  but  we  believe  stocks  should 
be  bought  around  present  levels  for  a  good  ad- 
vance later  on. 

Wheat — E.Tch  week  it  has  been  a  spurt  of 
activity  and  an  upturn  in  prices,  only  to  turn 
round  for  a  retrograde  movement  to  the  starting 
point.  The  market  has  been  invariably  dull  and 
weak  just  at  this  time  every  year.  This  for  the 
reason  that  cash  wheat  from  the  harvest  fields 
always  has  been  crowded  on  the  market  faster 
than  the  demand  could  assimilate  it.  The  result 
was  of  course  an  accumulation  of  stocks,  neces- 
sitating hedging  sales  for  the  speculative  trade 
to  carry.  But  this  is  not  the  case  now.  This 
year  is  a  noticeable  exception  to  the  conditions 
of  other  years,  especially  to  that  of  last  year 
wlien  the  receipts  in  Chicago  were  twelve  million 
trshcls  during  the  month  of  July  and  the  visible 


increased  eighteen  million  bushels  during  that 
time  and  continued  to  increase  until  it  reached 
seventy-one  million  bushels.  We  commenced  the 
crop  year  with  a  trifle  smaller  visible  supply  than 
a  year  ago,  and  if  the  stocks  in  private  elevators 
were  excluded,  as  was  the  case  last  year,  the 
visible  supply  would  be  considerably  less  than 
that  of  a  year  ago.  But  this  of  itself  is  of  but 
slight  consequence.  It  is  the  question  of  future 
supplies  that  is  the  most  important  feature.  In 
this  respect  there  is  but  little  soft  wheat  that 
will  not  be  required  in  the  immediate  locality 
where  it  grew.  There  are  large  areas  that  are  so 
bare  of  wheat  that  local  mills  will  have  to  import 
it  from  the  beginning  of  the  season  to  the  end 
of  the  crop  year.  The  first  results  of  threshing 
returns  are  of  course  conflicting.  Some  good 
yields  are  reported,  but  many  more  that  are  small, 
of  light  weight  and  inferior  grade.  There  is  al- 
most an  entire  exhaustion  of  interior  reserves 
to  begin  with,  which  was  not  the  case  last  year. 
In  our  opinion  it  is  only  a  question  of  time  when 
the  situation,  both  foreign  and  domestic,  will  ex- 
ercise such  a  compelling  force  as  to  cause  a  re- 
turn to  active  and  appreciating  markets. 

Corn — The  corn  market  has  had  the  depressing 
influence  of  unfavorable  climatic  conditions. 
Values  have  suffered  in  consequence.  While  the 
crop  is  backward  it  is  doing  well.  The  question 
of  receipts  is  the  most  important  factor  at  pres- 
ent. It  is  claimed  that  farmers'  deliveries  will 
be  light  until  the  new  crop  reaches  maturity.  The 
demand  will  be  sufficient  to  maintain  present 
values,  if  indeed  it  does  not  show  some  apprecia- 
tion in  this  respect. 

Cotton — The  week  should  be  classed  as  favor- 
able, for  progress  was  made  in  the  growth  of 
cotton  and  in  cultivation  also.  Temperatures 
averaged  near  normal  which  was  a  very  favorable 
thing,  but  in  the  States  of  .'\rkansas,  Tennessee, 
Mississippi,  Alabama  and  Georgia  the  rainfall 
vas  continuous  and  in  many  places  quite  heavy, 
so  that  cultivation  was  checked  and  in  a  few 
localities  altogether  suspended.  There  is  some 
danger  of  grass  if  rains  continue  in  these  States, 
as  the  plant  has  not  attained  its  normal  size  for 
the  season.  It  does  not  appear  that  any  recent 
damage  has  been  done  which  a  week  of  bright 
warm  weather  would  not  rectify.  In  all  other 
States  cultivation  and  growth  proceeded  together 
and  the  crop  status  is  improved.  In  Texas  and 
Oklahoma  the  crop  is  excellent  in  promise,  the 
only  bar  being  its  lateness  which  some  corres- 
pondents in  Oklahoma  fear  will  expose  it  to 
damage  from  frost.  The  greatest  complaint 
lodged  against  the  plant  is  its  small  size,  for 
there  are  fields  in  all  States  save  Texas  which 
contain  cotton  not  more  than  six  inches  higli 
which  is  far  below  normal  size  for  the  season. 


Merchants  National  Bank 
of  San  Francisco 

Corner  New  Montgomery  and  Market  Streets 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  .$1,768,076.98 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   1.639,482.36 

Deposits    6.368,228.50 

OFFICERS 

Alfred  L.  Meyerstein  President 

J.    H.    Spring  Vice-President 

C.   A.    Hawkins  Vice-President 

R.  B.  Murdoch   Assistant  to  President 

W.    W.   Jones  Cashier 

Geo.  Long   Assistant  Cashier 

C.   C.   Campbell  .\ssistant  Cashier 

F.    \V.    Judson  Assistant  Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Geo.   C.    Boardman         W.  J.  Hotchkiss 
James  C.  Eschen  C.  A.  Hawkins 

John  M.  Keith  Gavin  McN'ab 

Alfred  Meyerstein  Robert  Oxnard 
Frederick  F.  Sayre  John  H.  S,)ring 
Harry  N.  Stetson  (',.  H.  l„mbsen 

A.  A.  Watkins 
The  officers  of  this  Bank  will  be  pleased  to  meet  or 

correspond    with    those    who    contemplate  making 

changes  or  opening  new  accounts. 

Safe  Deposit  Vaults  open  from  7:30  a.  m.  to  12 

p.  m.,  Sundays  and   Holidays  included. 


The  German  Savings  and  Loan  Society 

(THE  GERMAN  BANK) 
Savings  Incorporated  1868  Commercial 

526  CALIFORNIA   ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Member  of  the   Associated   Savings  Banks 
of  San  Francisco 

The  following  Branches  for  Receipt  and  Payment  of 
I  )ep<)sits  only  : 

MISSION   BRANCH.   2572   MISSION  STREET 
Between  21st  and  22nd 

RICHMOND    DISTRICT    BRANCH.   601  CLEMENT 
Corner  of  7th  Avenue 
HAIGHT    ST.    BRANCH.    1456    HAIGHT  ST. 
Near  Masonic  Ave. 

JUNE  29th,  1912: 

Assets   $51,140,101.75 

Capital  actually  paid  up  in  Cash   1.000,000.00 

Reserve  and  Contingent  Funds   1.656,403.80 

Employees'  Pension  Fund   140.109.60 

Number  of  Depositors    56.609 

Office  Hours:  10  o'clock  a.  m.  to  3  o'clock  p.  m.,  ex- 
c'pl  .Saturdays  to  12  o'clock  m.  and  Saturday  evenings 
from  6:30  p.  m.  to  8  o'clock  p.  m.  for  receipt  of  deposits 
only. 


Wells  Fargo  Nevada  National  Bank 

OF   SAN  FRANCISCO 
No.  2  MON1GUMLHY      i  KEET 

Capital.  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits ...  .$1 1 .055.471. 1 1 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   10.519.217.23 

Deposits    25,775,597.47 

Officers — Isaias  VV.  Hellman,  Pres.;  I.  W.  Hellman  Jr., 
v. -Pres.  ;  F.  L,  Lipman,  V. -Pres.  ;  James  K.  Wilson, 
V.-I'res. ;  Frank  B.  King,  Cashier ;  W.  McGavin.  Asst. 
Cashier;  F.  L.  Jacobs,  Asst.  Cashier;  C.  L,  Davis,  Asst. 
Cashier;  A.  D.  Oliver,  Asst.  Cashier;  A.  B.  Price,  Asst. 
Cashier. 

Directors — Isaias  W.  Hellman,  I.  VV.  Hellman  Jr., 
Joseph  Sloss,  A.  Christeson,  Percy  T.  Morgan,  Wm. 
Hans.  1".  W.  Van  Sicklen,  Hartland  I. aw.  VVm.  F. 
Herrin,  Henry  Kosenfeld.  John  C.  Kirkpatrick,  James 
L.  Flood,  J.  Henry  Meyer,  Chas.  J.  Deering.  A.  H. 
Payson.  James  K.  Wilson  and  F.  L.  Lipman. 
Customers  of  this  Bank  are  offered  every  facility  consis- 
tent with  prudent  banking.  New  accounts  are  invited. 
Safe  Deposit  Vaults 


Telephone    DQI^GLAS  2487 


Members 
New  York  Stock  Exchange 
New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
New  York  Coffee  Exchange 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade 


E.  F.  HUTTON  &  CO. 

THE  PIONEER  HOUSE 

BROKERS 


]490  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
Branch,  ST.  FRANCIS  HOTEL 


R.   E.  MULCAHY,  Manager 


Two  Private  Wire*  to 
Chicago   and   New  York 


Washington,  D.  C.  1301  F  Stre« 
Los  Angeles.  112  W.  Third  Street 
New   York,  31-33-35   New  Strtet 


July  13,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


21 


It  is  noteworthy,  however,  that  growth  is  now 
more  rapid  and  will  continue  so  with  warm 
weather.  Cotton  is  beginning  to  open  as  far 
north  as  La  Grange,  Tex.  The  cotton  caterpillar, 
although  found  in  several  localities,  has  as  yet 
made  little  headway  and  the  same  may  be  said 
of  the  boll  weevil. 


FINANCIAL  NOTES 

The  Oakland,  Antioch  and  Eastern  Railroad 
Company  has  placed  its  full  issue  of  bonds  for 
five  million  dollars,  and  will  receive  its  second 
payment  of  twenty  per  cent  in  August.  The  road 
will  be  completed  and  in  operation  from  Oak- 
land to  Bay  Point,  a  distance  of  thirty  miles,  by 
the  first  of  January.  When  finished  the  road  will 
extend  from  Oakland  to  Sacramento,  a  distance 
of  seventy-eight  miles,  and  will  open  up  a  pro- 
ductive area  of  country  rich  in  market  and  dairy 
produce.  The  system  will  be  electric,  the  cars 
of  the  latest  style  and  appointments.  The  Hol- 
man  Car  Works  of  San  Francisco  were  awarded 
a  contract  for  twelve  cars  for  December  delivery. 
There  are  four  hundred  men  engaged  at  present 
on  construction  work.  Just  now  they  are  build- 
ing the  three-thousand  foot  tunnel  at  Redwood 
Canyon. 

Tonopah  stocks  are  showing  a  great  deal  of 
strength  these  days.  The  properties  are  in  a 
flourishing  condition,  and  the  prospect  for  larger 
output  is  very  bright.  Those  who  are  on  the  in- 
side are  watching  the  Tonnpahs  with  lively  ex- 
pectations of  great  improvement  in  values. 

The  trade  journals  are  optimistic  about  the 
business  outlook.  They  find  that  the  first  half 
of  the  year  closed  with  much  actual  achievement 
i::  the  betterment  of  business  and  much  promise 
for  the  remainder  of  the  year.  There  is  strength- 
ened confidence  among  manufacturers,  traders 
and  investors.  Railroad  gross  earnings  in  June 
increased  4.3  per  cent.  The  money  market  is  re- 
ported to  be  in  good  shape. 


Smith  has  a  lovely  baby  girl, 
The  stork  left  her  with  a  flutter. 

Smith  named  her  Oleomargerine, 
For  he  hadn't  any  but  her. 


In  a  Safe  Deposit  box  in  the 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

All  it  will  cost  you  is  $4.00  per  year  and  you 
have  the  assurance  that  your  valuable  papers, 
etc.,  are  safe. 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults  p.*;r;„'dMar"';"s'u. 

John  F.  Cunningham,  Manager 


Boum-Boum 

(Continued  from  Page  7.) 

which  he  had  bought,  very  dearly,  at  a  toy-shop. 
It  had  cost  him  his  wages  for  several  days' 
work.  But  he  would  have  given  much  more  to 
bring  back  a  smile  to  those  pale  Hps. 

The  child  looked  for  a  moment  at  the  toy 
glittering  on  the  white  sheets,  then  said  sadly: 

"This  is  not  Boum-boum!  I  want  to  sec 
Boum-boum !" 

Ah,  if  Jacques  could  only  have  wrapped  him 
up  in  the  bed-clothes,  carried  him  off  to  the  cir- 
cus, and  said  to  him,  "See,  there  he  is!" 

Jacques  did  better  than  that.  He  went  to  the 
circus,  asked  for  the  clown's  address,  and  timidly, 
with  legs  trembling  from  anxiety,  he  went  up 
the  steps  which  led  to  the  artist's  apartment  at 
Montmartre.  What  he  was  doing  seemed  very 
rash;  yet,  after  all,  the  actors  often  went  to  the 
houses  of  rich  people  to  sing  or  to  recite  mono- 
logues. Perhaps  the  clown  would  be  willing  to 
come  to  say  good  day  to  Francois.  And  then 
he  wondered  how  Boum-boum  would  receive  him. 

But  this  was  not  Boum-boum!  It  was  M. 
Moreno,  a  charming  man  who  greeted  Jacques 
in  his  beautiful  home,  full  of  rare  books  and 
choice  paintings.  Jacques  looked  at  him,  not 
able  to  recognize  the  clown,  and  stood  helplessly 
twirling  his  felt  hat  between  his  fingers,  while 
the  other  man  patiently  waited.  Then  the  father 
made  his  excuses.  He  had  come  to  ask  a  most 
astonishing  thing.  It  was  all  about  the  poor 
little  one.  A  pretty  little  boy,  Monsieur,  and  so 
intelligent!  Always  at  the  head  of  his  classes 
at  school — except  at  arithmetic,  which  he  could 
not  understand.  A  dreamer.  Monsieur,  yes,  a 
dreamer;  and  the  proof  of  it  is  that  he  wants  to 
see  you,  that  he  thinks  of  no  one  but  you,  and 
that  you  are  before  him,  like  a  star  which  he 
longs  to  have,  and  at  which  he  is  always  gazing. 

When  he  had  finished,  Jacques  was  pale,  and 
the  big  drops  stood  upon  his  forehead.  He  dared 
not  look  at  the  clown,  who  stood  with  his  eyes 
fixed  upon  the  workman.  What  would  Boum- 
boum  say?  Would  he  send  him  ofif  roughly, 
would  he  take  him  for  a  crazy  man? 

"Where  do  you  live?"  Boum-boum  asked. 

"Oh,  quite  near — in  the  Rue  des  Abbesses!" 

"All  right,"  said  the  clown.  "Does  your  boy 
want  to  see  Boum-boum?'    He  shall  see  him!" 

Wlien  the  door  opened,  Jacques  Legrand  called 
joyfully  to  his  son: 

"Francois,  be  happy,  my  boy!  Here  is  Boum- 
boum!" 

A  gleam  of  joy  lighted  the  child's  face.  He 
raised  himself  upon  his  mother's  arm,  and  turned 
his  head  toward  the  two  men  who  were  coming 
to  his  bedside.  He  looked  earnestly  for  a  mo- 
ment at  the  gentleman  in  the  frock  coat,  smiling 
so  gaily  at  him,  and  whom  he  did  not  know. 
But  when  they  told  him  that  this  was  Boum- 
boum,  he  slowly  and  sadly  let  his  head  fall  back 


ANGLO  &  LONDON 
PARIS  NATIONAL  BANK 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

PAIO-UP    CAPITAL  S4.000.000 
SURPLUS  AND  UNDIVIDED  PROFITS       »  I.600.000 
TOTAL  RESOURCES  $40,000,000 
OFFI  CER5 


HERBERT  FLEISHHACKER 


PRESIDENT 


SIG.  GREENEBAUM 

JOS  FRIEDLANDER 

C.F  HUNT 

R  ALTSCHUL 

C  R  PARKER 

WM  H  HIGH 

H  CHOYNSKI 

G    R  BURDICK 

A.  L  LANG  ER  MAN 


CHAIRMAN  OF  THE  BOARD 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
CASHIER 
ASSISTANT  CASHIER 
ASSISTANT  CASHIER 
ASSISTANT  CASHIER 
ASSISTANT  CASHIER 
SECRETARY 


upon  the  pillow,  and  his  eyes  became  fixed  again, 
his  beautiful,  large  blue  eyes,  which  looked  be- 
yond the  walls  of  the  little  room,  still  searching, 
searching  so  anxiously  for  Boum-boum's  make- 
up, his  tinsel,  spangles,  and  butterflies,  even  as  a 
lover  pursues  his  dream. 

"No,"  the  child  said,  and  his  voice  was  no 
longer  dull,  but  sorrowful,  "No,  this  is  not 
Boum-boum !" 

The  clown,  standing  near  the  little  bed,  gazed 
upon  the  boy's  face  with  an  earnest  look,  very 
serious  and  infinitely  tender.  He  shook  his  head, 
glanced  at  the  anxious  parents,  and  said,  with  a 
smile: 

"He  is  quite  right!  This  is  not  Boum-boum!" 
And  he  went  away. 

"I  shall  never  see  him!  I  shall  never  see 
Boum-boum  again!"  said  the  child. 

All  at  once — it  was  not  half  an  hour  since  the 
clown  had  gone — the  door  was  suddenly  thrown 
open,  and  there  stood  the  real  Boum-boum,  in 
his  black  spangled  tights,  with  the  little  yellow 
tuft  on  his  head,  the  golden  butterflies  upon  his 
breast  and  his  back,  and  a  broad  smile,  like  a 
slot  in  a  money-box,  spreading  across  his  jolly 
powdered  face.  Yes,  it  was  the  real  Boum-boum 
of  the  circus,  little  Francois's  Boum-boum! 

The  joy  of  life  shone  in  the  child's  laughing, 
weeping,  happy  eyes.  He  clapped  his  thin  hands, 
and  cried  "Bravo!"  and  exclaimed  with  all  his 
old  gaiety: 

"That  is  he!  That  is  he  this  time!  There  is 
Boum-boum!    Good-day,  Boum-boum!" 

When  the  doctor  came  back  that  day  he  found, 
seated  on  the  foot  of  little  Francois's  bed  a  white- 
faced  clown,  who  was  making  the  boy  laugh  and 
laugh  again,  and  who  said,  as  he  stirred  a  lump 
of  sugar  at  the  bottom  of  a  cup  of  herb-tea: 

"You  know,  if  you  don't  drink  this,  Francois, 
Boum-boum  won't  come  back  any  more!" 

And  the  child  drank. 

"Isn't  it  good?" 

"Very  good!    Thanks,  Boum-boum!" 

"Doctor,"  said  the  clown,  "don't  be  jealous! 
But  it  really  seems  to  me  that  my  grimaces  have 
done  him  as  much  good  as  your  prescriptions!" 

The  father  and  mother  were  weeping,  but  this 
time  it  was  from  joy. 

And  until  little  Francois  was  on  his  legs  again, 
every  day  a  carriage  stopped  before  the  work- 
man's door,  at  Montmartre,  and  a  man  got  out 
of  it,  wrapped  in  a  cloak,  with  the  collar  turned 
up,  and  underneath  it  he  wore  the  circus  costume, 
and  his  merry  face  was  powdered. 

"What  do  I  owe  you.  Monsieur?"  said  Jacques 
Legrand  to  the  great  clown,  when  the  child  went 
out  of  doors  for  the  first  time. 

The  clown  stretched  out  his  big  hands  to  the 
parents,  like  a  gentle  Hercules,  and  said: 

"Only  the  clasp  of  your  hands!" 

Then,  kissing  the  rosy  cheeks  of  the  child,  he 
added  laughingly: 

"And  you  must  permit  me  to  put  upon  my 
visiting  cards:  "Boum-boum,  acrobatic  doctor; 
physician-in-ordinary  to  little  Francois!'" 


22 


TOWN  TALK 


July  13,  1912 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  Caliiornia,  in  and  for 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,177; 
Department  No.  10.  „ 

CLARA  JESSURUN,  Plaintiff,  vs.  WALTER  S.  JES- 
SL'RUN,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greetmg  to : 
Walter  S.  Jessurun,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  directed  to  appear  and  answer  the  com- 
plaint in  an  action  entitled  as  above  brought  against  you 
in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  within  ten  days 
after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons — if  served  within 
this  City  and  County;  or  within  thirty  days  if  served  else- 
where. , 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  money  or  damages  in  the  complaint  as 
arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court  for  any 
other  relief  demanded  in  the  complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
at  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, this  7th  day  of  May,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  H.  L  PORTER,  Deputy  Clerk. 
HENRY  ACH,  Atty.   for  Plaintiff, 

Rooms  316-320   Balboa   Building,   Southeast   Corner  ot 
Market  and  Second  Sts.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  5-18-10 

CERTIFICATE  OF  NAME  OF  BUSINESS 

I.  the  undersigned,  Victor  R.  Ulman,  do  hereby  state 
that  I  am  engaged  in  business  and  am  doing  business  in  the 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  California,  un- 
der the  name  and  style  of  Victor  R.  Ulman  &  Co. 

That  I  am  the  only  one  interested  in  the  said  busmess 
and  that  I  am  the  sole  owner  thereof. 

That  my  name  and  residence  is  as  follows:  Victor  R. 
l  lman,  314  Locust  Street,  in  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco,  State  of  California. 

That  my  place  of  business  is  No.  149  New  Montgomery 
Street,  in  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of 
California.  ,    ,        ,  , 

Dated  at  San  Francisco,  Cal.,  this  11th  day  of  June,  1912. 

VICTOR  R.  ULMAN. 

STATE  OF  CALIFORNIA, 
City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — ss. 

On  this  nth  day  of  June,  1912,  before  me,  Julius  Cal- 
mann,  a  Notary  Public  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  State  of  California,  residing  therein,  duly 
commissioned  and  sworn,  personally  appeared  Victor  R. 
Ulman,  known  to  me  to  be  the  person  whose  name  is  sub- 
scribed to  the  foregoing  instrument,  and  he  acknowledged 
to  me  that  he  executed  the  same. 

In  witness  whereof,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and 
affixed  my  official  seal  at  my  office  in  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco.  State  of  California,  the  day  and  year  in 
this   certificate   first   above   written  .,^t 

(Seal)  JULIUS  CALMANN, 

Notary  Public  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, State  of  California. 
OTTO    IRVING  WISE,  Atty.   at  Law, 

First  National  Bank  Bldg.,  San   Francisco,  Cal.  6-15-5 

ORDER   TO    SHOW   CAUSE   WHY    SALE   OF  REAL 
REAL  ESTATE  SHOULD  NOT  BE  MADE 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  12,438; 
Department  No.  10.  a 
In   the    Matter   of   the    Estate   of   MAJOR  CONWAY, 

^nnie  Conway,  the  Administratrix  of  the  estate  of  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  having  filed  in  this  Court  her  petition 
for  an  order  to  sell  the  real  estate  of  said  decedent  for 
the  purposes  therein  set  forth,  and  it  appearing  from  said 
petition  that  it  is  necessary  to  sell  the  whole  or  some  por- 
tion of  said  real  estate,  and  good  cause  appearing  there- 

Now  therefore,  it  is  hereby  ordered,  adjudged  and  decreed 
that  all  persons  interested  in  the  said  estate  of  said  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  be  and  appear  before  the  above  en- 
titled Court,  Department  No.  10  thereof,  on  Wednesday, 
the  31st  day  of  July,  1912,  at  10  o'clock  a.  m.  of  said  day, 
at  the  Courtroom  of  said  Court,  Room  No.  519,  in  the 
temporary  City  Hall  on  Market  Street  near  Eighth  Street, 
in  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, then  and  there  to  show  cause  why  an  order  should 
not  be  granted  to  the  said  Administratrix  to  sell  the  whole 
or  some  portion  of  the  real  estate  of  said  deceased. 

It  is  further  ordered  that  a  copy  of  said  order  be  pub-_ 
lished  for  at  least  four  successive  weeks  in  "Town  Talk, 
a  newspaper  printed   and  published  in  the  said  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco. 

Done  in  open  Court  this  21st  day  of  June,  1912. 

(Signed)       THOMAS  F.  GRAHAM, 

Judge. 

HUGH  K.  McKEVITT,  Atty.  for  .-Xdministratrix, 

Hearst  Bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-29-5 


5%  Per  Month 

SAVED  on  the  Investment  by  Buying 

THE 

ALASKA  REFRIGERATOR 

900,000  SOLD  SINCE  1878 
We    have    a   Test    Refrigerator   to   prove    what  we 
claim  for  it.    Please  call  and  see  it. 
Pacific  Coast  Agents 

W.  W.  MONTAGUE  &  CO. 

557-563  MARKET  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


Patrick  &  Company 

RUBBER  STAMPS 

Stencils,  Seals,  Signs,  Etc. 

560  Market  Street  San  FranciKO 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,026; 
Department  No.  10. 

l.UCILE  V.  LARM,  Plaintiff,  vs.  G.  LARM,  Defendant. 

-Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California,  Send  Greeting  to: 
(i.  I.arm,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  Required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  Summons,  if  served 
within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere  within 
thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and 
decree  of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony 
now  existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  Wilful  Desertion  and  Habitual  Intemperance; 
also  for  genera!  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in  the 
Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby  made. 

.\nd  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take  judg- 
ment for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the  Com- 
plaint as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court 
for   any  other   relief  demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  27th  day  of  Aprti,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH.  Deputy  Clerk. 
McGOWAN  and  WESTLAKE,  Attys.  for  Plaintiff, 

Humboldt  Bank  Bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-1-10 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  43,036  ; 
Department  No.  10. 

LOU  ETTA  WILMOTH,  Plaintiff,  vs.  HOWARD 
WELLINGTON  WILMOTH,  Defendant. 

.\ction  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to; 
Howard   VVellington   Wilmoth,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  P'rancisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons,  if 
served  within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere 
within    thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and  de- 
cree of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony  now 
existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  fiefendant's  willful  desertion  and  willful  neglect  of  plain- 
tiff; also  for  genera]  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in 
the  Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby 
made. 

.\nd  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appe.ir 
and  answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the 
Complaint  as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the 
Court   for   any   otller   relief  demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  26th  day  of  June,  .\.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  T.  WELCH,  Deputy  Clerk. 
M.  M.  GETZ,  ROBINSO.V  &  GETZ,  .\tty.  for  Plaintiff. 
45  Kearny  St.,  San  Francisco.  Cal.  6-29-10 

NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 
ICstate  of  LIP1'M.\X.\'  SACHS.  Deceascil— No.  \(,.M,}. 
N.  S. ;  I)ei>artment  No.  10. 
Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  undersigned,  Mary  Sachs 
and  Albert  liaruch.  Executors  of  the  Last  Will  and  Testa- 
ment of  Lippmann  Sachs,  deceased,  to  the  creditors  of  and 
all  persons  having  claims  against  the  said  deceased,  to  ex- 
hibit them  with  the  necessary  vouchers  within  ten  (10) 
months  after  the  first  publication  of  this  notice  to  the  said 
Executors  at  the  office  of  Heller,  Powers  &  P'hrman,  Room 
713  Nevatla  Bank  Building,  No.  14  Montgomery  Street, 
San  Francisco,  California,  which  said  office  the  undersigned 
select  as  their  place  of  business  in  all  matters  connected  with 
the  said  estate  of  Linpmann  Sachs,  deceased. 

MARY  SACHS. 
ALBERT  BARUCH, 
Executors  of  the   Last   Will   and  Testament  of  Lippmann 
Sachs,  Deceased. 
Dated:   July   13,  1912. 
HELLER,  POWERS  &  EIIRMAN, 
.Attorneys  for  Executors, 

Xev:rfla  Bank  Bldg.,  San  Francisco.  7-13-5 

Senator  Hoar's  Changed  Letter 

Medical  men  tell  with  unction  a  .story  at- 
tributed to  Senator  Hoar  and  told  at  the  expense 
of  a  close  friend  of  his  and  some  hospital  doctors 
;it  Washington. 

The  story  goes  that  the  friend  was  stricken  ill, 
suddenly,  so  ill  that  he  was  rushed  off  to  a 
private  hospital.  The  case  was  hurriedly  diagno- 
sed as  acute  appendicitis,  and  Senator  Hoar  was 
notified  that  an  operation  would  in  all  probability 
be  performed  at  once.  The  Senator  immediately 
prepared  to  send  a  note  of  condolence  and  en- 
couragement to  the  patient,  when  a  second  mes- 
sage arrived  informing  him  that  the  original 
diagnosis  was  incorrect,  and  that  the  case  was 
merely  one  of  acute  indigestion.  The  Senator 
clianged  his  rnind  about  the  letter  of  condolence, 
and,  instead,  sent  the  following: 

"I  notice  that  the  trouble  resulted  from  the 
table  of  contents  and  not  from  the  appendix." 


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VALUABLE  INFORMATION 

Of  a  Business,  Personal  or  Social  Nature 
from  the  Press  of  the  Pacific  Coast 

DAKES'  PRESS  CLIPPING  BUREAU 

12  GEARY  STREET,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

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Phones,  F  1289  and  Main  4133 

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Saved  the  Man  With  the  Red  Hair 

It  requires  great  coolness  and  experience  to 
steer  a  course  down  the  rapids  of  Sault  Ste.  Marie, 
and  a  short  time  ago  two  bold  Ameri- 
cans ventured  to  descend  them  without  boat- 
men, and  were  consequently  upset.  As  the  story 
is  told,  one  of  them  owed  his  salvation  to  a  sing- 
ular incident.  As  the  accident  took  place  im- 
mediately opposite  the  town,  many  of  the  in- 
habitants were  attracted  to  the  bank  of  the  river 
to  watch  the  struggles  of  the  unfortunate  men, 
thinking  that  any  attempt  at  a  rescue  would  be 
hopeless.  Suddenly,  however,  a  person  appeared 
rushing  toward  the  group,  frantic  with  excitement. 

"Save  the  man  with  the  red  hair!"  he  vehe- 
mently shouted;  and  the  exertions  which  were 
made  in  consequence  of  his  earnest  appeals 
proved  successful,  and  the  red-haired  individual, 
in  an  exhausted  condition,  was  safely  landed. 

"He  owes  me  eighteen  dollars,"  said  his  res- 
cuer, drawing  a  long  breath,  and  looking  ap- 
provingly on  his  assistants. 


July  13,  1912 


TOV/N  TALK 


23 


Letters 


Sad  But  Not  Disheartening 

"And  the  Lord  God  said:  Behold  this  man  has 
become  one  of  us."  This  is  the  genesis  of  the 
title  of  Ezra  Brudno's  novel,  "One  of  Us,"  a 
psychological  study  given  in  the  form  of 
biography,  in  which  a  crippled  artist  tells  in  sim- 
ple but  strong  language  the  story  of  his  growth 
and  development.  Raphael  was  born  with  a  de- 
formed back,  and  his  misfortune  appears  to  have 
excited  neither  affection  nor  compassion  from  his 
parents  who  looked  upon  him  as  just  one  more 
failure  in  their  unsuccessful  lives  until  he  devel- 
oped a  talent  for  music.  The  boy  was  passion- 
ately attached  to  his  violin  and  the  father  was 
looking  forward  to  an  exploitation  of  his  prodigy 
when  the  sensitive  lad  caught  sight  of  himself 
in  a  mirror  while  at  practice  and  was  appalled  at 
the  incongruity  of  his  ambition  and  his  appear- 
ance and  refused  to  pursue  his  studies.  A  little 
tact  and  sympathy  might  have  tided  him  over 
the  difficult  time  but  neither  was  forthcoming, 
and  being  reproached  for  his  idle  dependence 
it  is  scarcely  to  be  wondered  at  that  he  ran  away. 
Afoot  and  penniless  it  should  not  have  been 
difficult  to  reclaim  him  but  apparently  no  effort 
was  made  in  that  direction,  and  the  first  friend 
the  little  waif  made  was  an  escaped  convict,  with 
a  promising  chance  of  beginning  a  career  of 
crime,  had  he  not,  fortunately,  been  arrested  on 
the  first  venture.  The  burglar  escaped  arrest,  but 
the  singular  ontcoi-Hc  of  the  attempt  was  the  es- 
tablishment of  the  identity  of  Jack  Jessup,  escaped 
convict,  as  a  brother  of  Alfred  K.  Jessup,  many 
times  millionaire  and  local  magnate,  and  the 
placing  of  the  lad,  Raphael,  on  probation  as  a 
sort  of  protege  of  the  millionaire.  The  Jessups 
were  an  example  by  no  means  unique  in  Ameri- 
can history,  a  worthless  father,  an  abnormally 
large  family  struggling  in  poverty,  one  brother 
more  selfish  and  less  patient,  striking  out  for 
himself,  developing  his  talent  and  reaping  its  full 
value  while  the  other  remained  at  home,  shoulder- 
ing the  domestic  burden  until  he  broke  under 
the  weight  of  the  accumulation,  the  family  dis- 
integrating and  losing  touch  with  each  other  un- 
less something  as  unexpected  as  the  burglarizing 
of  a  namesake's  mansion  out  of  sheer  bravado, 
leads  to  revelations.  Raphael  developed  a  sec- 
ondary talent  for  drawing  and  painting,  which,  in 
time,  leads  us  into  the  Latin  quarter  of  Paris 
where  Mr.  Brudno  shows  us  less  of  the  cocotte 
and  the  cabarets  than  most  writers.  Possibly  a 
sensitive  hunchback  would  find  them  less  enter- 
taining than  the  average  student,  but  in  any  case, 
some  one  must  attend  to  some  work  sometimes. 
Here  again  we  meet  with  the  Jessups,  Walt,  the 
son,  a  pleasant,  handsome  lad  having  developed 
into  a  handsome,  weak  and  vicious  young  man 
who,  though  he  has  not  come  within  the  clutches 
of  the  law,  is  a  far  worse  citizen  than  his  convict 
uncle.  Walt  is  the  typical  son  of  the  American 
millionaire  who  expects  to  buy  everything  and 
is  seldom  disappointed.  Here  again  we  meet 
with  other  Americans,  more  especially  with  the 


wife  and  daughter  of  the  Rev.  Lennox,  of  the 
Jessup  metropolis.  Mrs.  Lennox  is  a  type  of  the 
able  and  managing  mother,  quite  overshadowing 
her  husband  and  carefully  cultivating  her  one 
daughter  for  a  marriage  of  money,  Jessup  money 
for  choice.  Norma  Lennox  had  inspired  the  boy 
Raphael  with  a  passionate  and  renunciatory  affec- 
tion, for  his  morbid  fancy  had  pictured  himself 
as  repulsive  and  altogether  outside  the  common 
experiences  of  mankind,  and  on  the  theory  that 
since  Walt  Jessup  was  what  she  wanted  Walt 
Jessup  she  should  have,  when  a  very  ugly  trans- 
action in  which  Jessup  was  involved  came  to 
light,  it  was  Raphael  who  assumed  the  responsi- 
bility, a  mistaken  form  of  generosity  which  en- 
abled Mrs.  Lennox  to  accomplish  her  end,  with 
the  usual  result  of  a  miserably  unhappy  marriage 
for  Norma  with  a  dissolute  and  untruthful  mate 
who  could  blubber  of  his  love  for  his  wife  but 
walk  out  into  any  form  of  dissipation,  and  a  swift 
slide  into  the  depths  of  tragedy  from  which  there 
came  forth  two  who  knew  definitely  good  from 
evil.  "One  of  Us"  is  a  sad  but  not  a  dishearten- 
ing story.  Ezra  Brudno  is  not  a  prolific  writer 
as  such  things  are  measured  in  these  days  when 
some  of  our  industrious  authors  turn  out  two 
full  sized  novels  a  year,  but  all  he  does  is  worth 
consideration.    From  J.  B.  Lippincott. 


A  Novel  of  Paranoiac  Society 

"His  Worldly  Goods"  which  appears  to  be 
Margaretta  Tuttle's  first  novel  takes  us  into  the 
highest  of  high  American  society — nothing  less 
than  the  circle  in  which  move  the  paranoiac  multi- 
millionaires. A  young  girl,  beautiful,  accom- 
plished, of  good  family  but  poor,  with  a  grudging 
domicile  among  relatives,  married  the  heir  to 
thirty  millions,  and  everyone  was  ecstatic  over 
the  match  and  her  astounding  good  luck.  To  be 
sure  Colin  Carson  was  "eccentric,"  "original,"  "in- 
dependent," and  all  the  other  synonyms  for  what, 
in  slang  phrase  and  amongst  humbler  folk,  would 
be  just  plain  "nutty."  No  one  would  dare  to 
question  the  sanity  of  thirty  millions  until  their 
possessor  commits  a  crime  which  brings  him  be- 
fore a  criminal  court  and  then  a  sanatorium  is  in- 
finitely preferable  to  a  penitentiary,  so  Colin 
Carson  did  pretty  much  as  whim  dictated  until 
two  years  after  his  marriage,  when,  he  developed 
a  mania  for  arson  and  was  privately  committed 
to  an  institution  designed 'for  the  care  and  re- 
straint of  his  class.  Meanwhile  his  young  wife, 
unable  to  divorce  a  lunatic,  was  enjoying  herself 
and  his  wealth  in  her  own  way,  more  or  less 
legitimate  and  laudable,  but  including  prolonged 
flirtations  with  eligibles  of  the  other  sex.  Of 
course  there  wasn't  a  bit  of  harm  in  it  except  in 
the  eyes  of  the  female  relatives  of  the  semi- 
detached and  those  of  other  women  who  would 
have  been  glad  to  attach  them  permanently. 
The  manager  of  the  Carson  estate  was  a  lawyer, 
one  Harding  who,  assuming  that  Mrs.  Carson  was 
too  ignorant  of  business  and  too  busy  spending 
money  to  pay  any  attention  to  details,  was  in- 
dustriously feathering  his  own  nest  at  the  ex- 
pense of  the   Carson   estate,   when  just  in  the 


DO  YOE  EYES  TROUBLE  YOU? 

If  so  consult  George  Mayerle,  the  German  Optical  Expert,  whose  professional  services 
have  been  appreciated  and  acknowledged  by  most  eminent  men. 

Mayerle's  German  Eye-Water,  the  greatest  eye  tonic  in  the  world,  at  reliable  druggists, 
50c,  or  by  mail  from  San  Francisco,  65c.  •  ,  i  .  a 

When  your  eye-glasses  or  spectacles  blur  or  tire  the  eyes,  wipe  them  with  Mayerle  s  An- 
tiseptic eye-glass  cleaner.  This  is  a  specially  prepared  chemical  cloth  for  polishing  lenses, 
opera,  field  and  marine  glasses.  .  -i    -j  r  -jc 

It  removes  all  stains  and  blemishes  immediately  without  sw.atching.    By  mail,  3  for  ^5c. 

EstablUhed  18  Year».    Always  look  for  the  name,  Mayerle 

GERMAN  OPTICAL  INSTITUTE 
960  MARKET  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 


George  Mayerle 


depth  of  his  transactions  he  discovered  that  she 
had  been  quietly  observant  and  was  about  to  have 
him  removed.  Just  as  quietly  he  made  his  own 
move,  and  it  was  quite  by  accident  that  Mrs.  Car- 
son discovered  he  had  taken  steps  for  a  re-ex- 
amination of  the  incompetent,  taking  advantage 
of  a  lucid  interval  which  would  further  his  plans, 
and  once  free  from  restraint,  with  Carson  under 
his  control,  he  would  have  a  free  hand.  To  cir- 
cumvent Harding  called  for  quick  work  and  a 
trusty  friend,  and  of  all  the  host  whom  she  had 
known  and  played  with  and  substantially  helped 
in  one  way  or  another,  the  choice  was  speedily 
narrowed  down  to  one,  the  rector  of  the  parish 
in  which  she  resided.  Out  of  the  incidents  relat- 
ing to  the  frustration  of  Harding's  plans,  the  sub- 
sequent escape  of  the  lunatic,  aided  and  con- 
cealed by  those  who  expected  to  profit  from  his 
control,  there  was  developed  a  genuine  love  be- 
tween Mrs.  Carson  and  Rev.  Rex  Thorne  which 
could  come  to  nothing  since  divorce,  besides  be- 
ing distasteful  to  the  minister,  was  impossible  to 
the  lady,  who  meanwhile  received  some  severe 
lessons  in  the  matter  of  the  advantages  there  are 
for  even  a  very  rich  and  charming  woman  in 
heeding  the  social  conventions.  Apparently  the 
affair  had  reached  an  impasse,  and  there  seemed 
to  be  nothing  to  do  but  wait.  However  a  way 
out  was  discovered  in  the  disclosure  of  a  secret 
marriage  years  before  and  sufficient  hush  money 
paid  over  at  the  crucial  moment  to  insure  silence. 
It  is  only  heroines  in  books  who  succeed  in  hav- 
ing their  cakes  and  eating  them  too.  Much  is 
made  of  the  unsophisticated  Nadine's  lack  of 
warning  of  the  character  of  the  man  she  was 
about  to  wed,  but  of  what  avail  has  warning  ever 
been?  What  girl  has  ever  listened,  even  when 
dissipation  has  been  ungilded,  and  what  mother 
would  counsel  her  daughter  against  wealth  no 
matter  what  accompanied  it?  Side  by  side  with 
the  main  interest  there  are  two  other  love  stories 
which  travel  an  uninterrupted  path  towards  mar- 
riage, and  some  interesting  and  amusing  glimpses 
of  social  and  clerical  vagaries.  The  story  is 
rather  above  the  average  unless  one  is  inclined 
to  withhold  sympathy  from  deluded  innocents 
who  marry  wealth  indifferent  to  its  attachments. 
From  Bobbs-Merrill. 


Pacific  Printing  Co. 

Catalogue,  Pamphlet,  Commercial 
and  Law  Work 

PRINTERS 


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SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


Vol.  XX.    No.  1039 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  JULY  20,  1912 


PRICE,  10  CENTS 


TOWN  TALK 


Casa  Del  Rey 


THE  HOTEL  BEAUTIFUL 


ACCOMMODATIONS  FOR  1000  GUESTS 


SANTA  CRUZ 


Entrance  Casa  Del  Rey 


Don't  Miss  The 


Coast  View,  Santa  Cruz 


Wonderful  Water  Pageant 

July  20th  to  July  28th 

Yacht  Regattas,  Motor  Boat  Race,  Review  of  American  Battleships,  Parade  of 
Decorated  Water  Floats,  Swimming  and  Rowing  Contests,  Dancing, 

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Leading'  Hotels  and  Resorts 


IN  THE  GOOD  OLD  SUMMER  TIME 

we  want  you  at 

Hotel  Del  Monte  or  Pacific  Grove  Hotel 

where  we  have  the  most  glorious  ch'mate  on  the  coast;  never  a  hot 
day.  Here  you  can  Golf,  Motor,  Ride,  Swim,  and  Fish  with  perfect 
comfort. 

OUR  GOLF  COURSE 

is  now  pronounced  the  best  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  and  equal  to  any  in 
the  Eastern  States.     Write  for  rates  and  literature  to 

H.  R.  WARNER,  Del  Monte,  California 


CORONADO  BEACI^TALIifORNIA 


A CHOICE  retreat  away  from  the  intense  heat 
o(  summer.  Golting,  tennis,  motoring,  bay 
and  surf  bathing  and  every  other  imaginable  out- 
of-door  diversion  to  be  enjoyed  here.  Only  a 
few  minutes  ride  across  the  bay  from  San  Diego, 
bummer  Rates. 

H.  W.  Willi,  Maoater,  Corooado,  Cal.  or 
H.  F.  Norcroii,  A;:!.,  334  So.  Spring  St.,  Los  Aogcles,  CaL 


CLIFF  HOUSE 

SAN    FRANCISCO'S    MOST    FAMOUS  RESORT 

Unsurpassed  Cuisine 

(.1    la    carte  service) 

Dancing  in  Ball  Room  Every  Evening 
Private  Banquet  and  Dining  Rooms 
Friday  Fish  Dinner 

(table  d'hote) 
Vocal  and  Instrumental  Entertainment 


PARAISO 

HOT  SPRINGS 

Grandest   and   Most  Accessible. 
California's  Real  Paradise 

Only  four  hours  from  San  Francisco.  Wonderful 
natural  hot  soda  and  sulphur;  guaranteed  for 
rheumatism,  liver,  kidney  and  malaria,  all  stomach 
troubles.  Expert  masseurs.  Rates  $12  to  $16,  in- 
cluding baths.  Round  trip,  $6.35,  including  auto. 
.Autos  running  daily.  Leave  Third  and  Townsend 
7  a.  m.  and  4  p.  m.  Booklets  Peck-Judah,  687 
Market  street. 

H.  H.  McGOWAN,  Proprietor  and  Manager, 
Paraiso  Springs,  Monterey  County 


CASA  DEL  REY 


New  300-room,  fire-proof  hotel 
located  near  the  beach 
and  Casino. 


OPEN  ALL  YEAR  ROUND 
AMERICAN  PLAN 


Tennis  Courts,  Good  Boating, 
Bathing- and  Fishing.  Numer- 
ous drives  along  the  Coast 
and  through  the  Mountains. 

SUPERIOR  GOLFING 


Santa  Cruz  Beach  Hotel  Co. 


CASTLE  CRAGS  FARM 

NEAR  MT.  SHASTA 

California's  Most  Delightful  Mountain 
Resort 

Real  pine  log  cabins,  with  great  stone 
fireplaces;  hot  and  cold  shower  baths;  elec- 
tric lights;  fine  table  with  home  cooking. 


HOTEL  VICTORIA 

COR.  BUSH  AND  STOCKTON  STS. 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

A  downtown  residence  hotel  of  the  high- 
est order,  appealing  particularly  to  those 
who  value  comfort  and  convenience  more 
than  mere  ostentation  and  who  appreciate 
excellence  of  cuisine  and  service  at  mod- 
erate expense. 

American  Plan,  from  $3.00  per  day  up 
European  Plan,  from  $1.50  per  day  up 

For  rates  and  reservations  address 

MRS.  W.  F.  MORRIS 

Proprietor 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


HOTEL  ST.  FRANCIS 

Turkish  Baths 

12th  Floor 
Ladies  Hair  Dressing  Parlors 

2d  Floor 
Cafe 

White  and  Gold  Restaurant 

Lobby  Floor 
Electric  Grill 
Barber  Shop 

Basement,  Geary  St.  entrance 
Under  the  Management  of  James  Woods 


PALACE  HOTEL 

Situated  on  Market  Street 
In  the  Center  of  the  City 

Take  Any  Market  Street  Car  from  the  Ferry 

FAIRMONT  HOTEL 

The  Most  Beautifully  Situated  of  Any  City 
Hotel  in  the  World 

Take  Sacramento  Street  Cars  from  the  Ferry 

TWO  GREAT  HOTELS 
UNDER  THE  MANAGEME.NT  OF  THE 
PALACE   HOTEL  COMPANY 


Hotel  Rowardennan 


BEN  LOMOND.  CAL. 


In  the  Mountains  by  the  Sea 
Open  All  Year  Round 
Under   New  Managenaent 

Rates  $17.50  to  $25.00  per  Week 
Excellent  Cuisine  and  Service 

Automobile   parties   will    find   this  resort 
|)lace   to   stop   at.    Fishing   season   now   open.  For 
information  and  booklet,  address, 

J.  M.  SHOULTS 

Ben   Lomond,  Cal. 
Or  the  Peck-Judah  Co.,  San  Francisco. 


good 


Golf,  Bathe  and  Rest  at 

Paso  Robles  Hot  Springs 

Five  Hours  from  San  Francisco 


WILLOW  RANCH 

REDWOOD  HEIGHTS— Grandest  view  of  the 
Santa  Cruz  Mountains;  overlooking  ocean  and  beach. 
Delightfully  located  in  the  Redwoods,  5  miles  from 
Santa  Cruz.  Spring  water.  Excellent  table,  bath 
houses,  swimming  pool,  dance  pavilion,  hunting  arid 
fishing.  Splendid  auto  service  free.  Daily  mail 
Phone  Santa  Cruz  8  J  13.    $8.00  per  week. 

MRS.   M.  J.  CRANDELL, 
Santa  Cruz,  Cal. 


GILROY  HOT  SPRINGS 

SANTA  CLARA  CO. 

Most  favorably  noted  for  its  health-healing  waters, 
ideal  climate,  grand  mountain  scenery  and  first-class 
table. 

Only   four   hours   from   San    Francisco,  including 
delightful  stage  ride  over  the  best  kept  mountain  road 
in  California.    Hunting  and  trout  fishing.    Send  for 
booklet  or  see   Peck-Judah,  687  Market  street. 
W.  J.  McDonald,  Proprietor 


TOWN  TALK 

THE   PACIFIC  WEEKLY 


Vol.  XX.  San  Francisco,  July  20,  1912  No.  1039 


JAMES  K.  HACKETT 

Who  comes  to  the  Columbia  Theater  on  Monday  night,  July  22,  to  inaugurate  a  nutable  dranialic  season.  His  first 
play  will  be  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  to  be  followed  by  other  plays  by  well  known  and  accepted  authors  that  will  have  their 
premieres  here. 


4 


TOWN  TALK 

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A  Plea  for  Tradition 

The  legends  of  a  country  are  among  its 
most  valuable  assets.  Legends  have  served 
as  the  inspiration  of  some  of  the  most  bril- 
liant exploits  of  history.  It  was  a  legend, 
for  example,  that  nerved  the  arms  of  the 
Normans  in  the  Battle  of  Hastings.  For 
was  it  not  the  Song  of  Roland  that  served 
as  the  signal  for  the  onset  when  the  gallant 
minstrel  Taillefer  advanced  on  horseback 
tossing  his  sword  in  the  air  and  chanting 
the  metrical  story  of  the  stirring  romance? 
If  a  legend  or  anything  that  goes  by  the 
name  of  tradition  does  nothing  more  than 
raise  national  enthusiasm  it  is  of  priceless 
value  and  should  be  cherished.  Because 
the  truth  of  it  cannot  be  established  is  not 
sufficient  reason  for  putting  it  on  an  index 
expurgatorius.  If  we  were  such  sticklers 
for  the  truth  as  to  reject  everything  that 
]>artakcs  of  the  nature  of  the  apocryphal  we 
should  have  to  turn  our  back  on  many  pages 
of  history.  Now  what  we  are  coming  to  is 
this, — that  being  a  very  young  nation  we 
have  a  very  meagre  supply  of  the  kind  of 
literature  that  serves  for  wholesome  inspira- 
tion, and  therefore  we  should  guard  jealously 
our  small  stock  of  tradition  and  resent  with 
indignation  every  attempt  to  deplete  it. 
This  observation  we  make  because  we  learn 
that  a  Philadelphian,  Joseph  Jackson,  de- 
scribed in  the  Eastern  press  as  "Pennsyl- 
vania's best  known  historian,"  after  "years 
of  study  and  research,"  has  come  forward  in 
a  spirit  of  iconoclasm  to  shatter  the  tradi- 
tion that  has  clung  through  the  years  to 
the  dear  old  Liberty  Bell.  Joseph  Jackson 
is  a  stranger  to  us.  Hitherto  we  had  not 
heard  of  him  as  a  historian  or  anything  else, 
but  it  is  not  necessary  to  our  purpose  to 
deny  that  he  is  a  writer  of  history.  We  have 
eminent  authority  for  it  that  history  is  no 
more  respectable  than  an  old  woman's  tale. 
Frederick  the  Great  called  for  "my  liar" 
when  he  wanted  to  read  history.  Napoleon 
pronounced  all  history  "a  fable  agreed 
upon."  It  is  absurd  to  challenge  tradition 
when  it  cannot  be  traced  to  a  writer  of 
history  who  was  contemporaneous  with  the 
event.  But  that  is  what  Joseph  Jackson 
has  done  in  the  matter  of  the  story  of  the 
bell  that  proclaimed  liberty  through  all  the 
land.    A  great  mass  of  history  we  should 


TOWN  TALK 

have  to  reject  as  worthless  if  we  accepted 
the  principle  which  Joseph  Jackson  pre- 
sumes to  apply  to  the  story  of  the  ringing 
of  the  Liberty  Bell  on  a  certain  memorable 
day  in  1776.  Everybody  that  makes  his- 
tory doesn't  have  time  to  write  it.  Nor 
when  history  is  in  the  making  is  everybody 
aware  that  it  is  worth  preserving.  By 
tradition  alone  has  many  a  virtuous  action 
been  rescued  from  oblivion.  Some  of  the 
greatest  historians  are  unknown.  They 
were  old  women  with  veracity,  good  sense, 
memory  and  imagination.  In  many  a 
woman  of  this  type  we  may  find  the  history 
of  her  times  or  neighborhood  enriched  by 
circumstances  never  to  be  found  in  books. 
And  so  we  say  to  this  unimaginative  person 
Joseph  Jackson,  Get  thee  gone  with  thy 
dry-as-dust  data  and  worthless  negative 
testimony !  Our  faith  in  the  sweet  tradition 
of  our  native  land  is  not  to  be  shaken  by  an 
old  fogy  of  Philadelphia  who  spends  his 
time  in  the  role  of  devil's  advocate.  The 
echoes  of  the  old  bell  have  come  down  to  us 
from  the  swaddling-clothes  days  of  the  Re- 
public, and  its  historic  utterance  is  not  to 
be  misinterpreted.  As  well  try  to  blot  out 
from  the  retina  of  the  eye  the  picture  of 
Paul  Revere  astride  his  foaming  charger  on 
the  eighteenth  of  April  in  seventy-five,  or 
of  Sheridan  sweeping  down  the  valley  of  the 
Shenandoah,  or  of  Barbara  Frietchie  in  her 
window  casement.  We  have  never  seen 
George  Washington's  hatchet,  but  we  are 
as  firmly  convinced  that  it  existed  as  that 
there  was  a  battle  of  Bunker  Hill.  At  any 
rate  there  is  much  more  of  truth  attached  to 
the  cherry  tree  incident  than  to  the  Roose- 
velt incident  at  San  Juan  which  was  re- 
corded by  contemporary  historians. 

The  Lorimer  Case 

Guilty  or  innocent,  ugly  as  he  has  been 
pictured  by  his  enemies,  we  cannot  ponder 
the  colossal  humiliation  of  William  Lorimer 
without  feelings  of  compassion  and  com- 
miseration. The  best  of  us,  it  has  been  said, 
are  but  poor  wretches  just  saved  from  ship- 
wreck. In  the  presence  of  what  is  tragic 
then, — a  fellow-pasenger  swallowed  up  by 
the  waves — it  is  but  natural  for  us  to  be 
touched  with  awe  and  pity.  There  were 
tears  in  the  Senate  we  are  told  when  Will- 
iam Lorimer  was  cast  into  outer  darkness. 
We  are  convinced  that  also  there  was  heard 
the  ironic  laughter  of  the  gods  in  the  back- 
ground. For  whatever  be  the  truth  regard- 
ing the  manner  of  Lorimer's  election  to  the 
Senate  the  fact  is  he  was  made  to  serve  as 
the  scapegoat  of  that  once  serene  delibera- 
tive body  now  become  extremely  sensitive 
to  the  ephemeral  mood  of  the  masses.  There 
are  times,  as  Schiller  tells  us,  when  the  gen- 
eral belief  of  the  people  works  its  efTect  as 
sure  as  truth  itself.  On  such,  we  believe, 
has  \\'^illiam  Lorimer  fallen.  Aside  from 
the  fact  that  thumbs  were  down  on  the 
bleachers,  the  sentiment  prevailed  in  the 
Senate  that  something  should  be  done  to  re- 
pair the  damaged  reputation  of  a  body  that 
has  been  the  object  in  recent  years  of  much 
calumny  as  well  as  of  much  honest  and  just 
animadversion.    As  the  expulsion  of  Lori- 


July  20,  1912 

mer  might  tend  to  expunge  the  impression 
that  the  Senate  holds  its  honor  lightly,  Lori- 
mer was  belled,  booked  and  candled  with 
all  the  sins  of  all  the  Senators  that  were 
ever  seated  by  corrupt  means  woven  in  a 
crown  of  thorns  on  his  obstinate  head.  We 
do  not  mean  to  impugn  the  honesty  and 
courage  of  all  the  Senators  who  voted  for 
Lorimer's  expulsion.  Even  a  Senator  may 
think  with  his  heart,  which  is  an  organ  sub- 
ject to  many  influences.  Town  Talk  is  of 
the  faith,  however,  of  Senator  Tillman,  ven- 
erable statesman,  victim  of  paralysis,  now 
feebly  approaching  his  grave,  his  thoughts 
chiefly  of  the  hereafter.  Senator  Tillman 
is  no  longer  subject  to  the  cravings  of  am- 
bition. The  curtain  is  slowly  descending 
on  the  last  scene.  He  is  conscious  of  its 
shadow.  And  Senator  Tillman  affirms  his 
belief  in  Lorimer's  innocence.  Senator 
Tillman  is  of  the  minority  wherein  so  often 
have  resided  truth,  justice,  rectitude.  But 
he  is  also  with  the  majority,  for  of  the  com- 
mittee of  eight  Senators  that  investigated 
the  charges  against  Lorimer,  the  court 
that  heard  all  the  testimony  and  saw 
all  the  witnesses,  five  members  rendered 
judgment  for  the  accused.  Five  of  the  eight 
members  of  that  court  reported  not  only 
that  the  charges  had  not  been  proved  but 
that  the  innocence  of  the  accused  had  been 
established  by  an  overwhelming  preponder- 
ance of  evidence.  Certain  newspapers  have 
told  us — the  same  unscrupulous  newspapers 
that  pictured  Lorimer  as  pleading  for  mercy 
when  he  was  challenging  and  defying  his 
enemies — these  newspapers  have  told  us 
that  Lorimer  was  "whitewashed"  by  the 
committee.  The  truth  is  that  never  in  the 
history  of  inquisitions  was  accused  man  so 
fully  and  emphatically  cleared  of  a  charge 
as  was  William  Lorimer.  The  majority  of 
the  committee  did  more  than  pronounce  him 
innocent;  They  cited  affirmative  proof  of 
the  infernality  of  the  men  who  were  trying 
to  compass  his  downfall,  and  they  paid  a 
tribute  to  the  character  of  the  accused  which 
an)'  man,  whether  in  public  or  in  private  life, 
might  he  proud  to  deserve.  Was  it  the  pur- 
pose of  these  judges  to  deceive  the  Senate? 
If  so  they  should  be  driven  from  its  portals. 
Now  what  about  the  three  Senators  who  dis- 
sented from  the  majority?  What  we  know 
of  them  is  this,— that  day  after  day  during 
his  argument  in  his  own  behalf  William 
Lorimer  challenged  these  three  Senators  to 
produce  any  kind  of  proof,  hearsay  or  legit- 
imate, of  some  of  the  things  which  they 
charged  in  their  report  and  on  which  they 
based  their  findings.  Not  one  of  them  came 
forward  to  deny  what  was  implied — that  he 
had  deliberately  falsified  the  record.  Now 
the  worst  that  has  been  said  of  William 
Lorimer,  even  by  his  enemies,  is  not  that 
he  committed  bribery,  but  that  he  was  the 
beneficiary  of  a  corrupt  transaction.  It  is 
not  even  asserted  that  he  was  aware  of 
wrongdoing.  All  things  considered,  per- 
haps it  is  to  be  hoped  for  the  honor  of  the 
United  States  Senate  that  this  was  one  of 
those  rare  instances  of  the  minority's  being 
in  the  wrong. 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


Proof  Conclusive 

Let  us  not  be  contemptuous  of  our  neigh- 
bors' prepossessions  and  prejudices.  The 
minds  of  all  of  us  are  warped  by  them  in 
some  degree.  They  are  not  to  be  dis- 
pensed with.  They  are  an  inseparable 
element  of  human  weakness.  So  instead  of 
sneering  at  the  crotchets  and  whimsies  of 
our  neighbors  we  should  be  mindful  of  our 
own  and  modest  about  them,  since  they  may 
not  stand  the  cold  pervading  light  of  rea- 
son. With  no  disposition  to  sneer,  then, 
being  conscious  of  our  weakness,  we  draw 
attention  to  our  neighbor  the  Bulletin  in 
one  of  its  fine  frenzies  induced  by  attach- 
ment to  what  is  at  once  a  prepossession  and 
a  prejudice.  We  allude  to  the  principle  of 
the  recall.  On  this  subject  our  neighbor 
delivers  brawling  judgments  unashamed  all 
week  long.  If  to  be  wise  were  to  be  ob- 
stinate the  Bulletin  might  set  itself  up  as 
one  of  the  profoundest  of  all  Progressive 
philosophers,  its  conclusions  being  as  in- 
corrigible to  proof  as  the  most  absurd  that 
emanate  from  the  new  primary  school  of 
political  thought.  Listen  to  our  neighbor: 
"Ji-idge  Archbald  of  the  United  States  Court 
of  Commerce  has  conclusively  proved  that 
it  is  a  mistake  to  put  any  judicial  officer  be- 
yond the  reach  of  the  recall."  How  has 
Judge  Archbald  proved  this?  By  getting 
impeached.  Here  is  a  clear  case  of  a  man 
impressing  on  himself  as  a  conviction  what 
is  obviously  nothing  but  a  prepossession. 
Of  course  the  editor  of  the  Bulletin  has  a 
reason  for  his  singular  dictum.  And  doubt- 
less he  thinks  that  having  a  reason  for  a 
thing  makes  it  right.  Men  have  had  a  rea- 
son why  two  and  two  make  five.  The  truth 
is  the  editor  of  the  Bulletin  doesn't  reason. 
He  merely  strikes  as  by  intuition  at  what 
he  conceives  to  be  the  result  of  an  intel- 
lectual process,  and  affirms  as  a  conclusion 
what  is  only  a  gratuitous  assertion.  The 
case  of  Judge  Archbald,  according  to  the 
Bulletin,  conclusively  proves  the  necessity 
of  the  recall  because  it  appears  that  he  is 
not  fit  for  the  bench  and  because  "Dem- 
ocrats and  Republicans  alike  agreed  on  ar- 
ticles of  impeachment."  Now  it  is  no  easy 
matter  to  follow  the  processes  of  the  think- 
ing machine  that  produces  argument  of  that 
sort.  Watchmakers  have  gone  crazy  study- 
ing the  derangements  of  an  extraordinarily 


bad  watch,  and  the  same  thing  might  hap- 
pen to  any  frail  being  who  would  attempt 
to  follow  the  windings  of  thought  resulting 
from  the  anatomical  lesion  in  this  particular 
case.  We  shall  therefore  curb  curiosity 
and  merely  observe  what  is  obvious, — that 
if  the  case  of  Judge  Archbald  proves  any- 
thing it  proves  there  is  no  necessity  of  the 
recall  since  a  bad  judge  may  be  reached  in 
the  sane,  orderly  manner  prescribed  by  the 
Constitution.  If  a  bad  judge  may  be  im- 
peached by  competent  authority  why  apply 
the  recall  ?  To  be  sure  Judge  Archbald  has 
not  yet  been  impeached.  And  that  appears 
to  be  the  Bulletin's  reason  for  regarding  as 
conclusive  the  necessity  of  the  recall ;  not 
the  recall  by  the  people,  however,  but  a  re- 
call by  Congress.  More  speed  is  what  the 
lUilletin  regards  as  essential  to  our  happi- 
ness. Be  precipitous  and  you  will  be 
blessed,  appears  to  be  the  Bulletin's  motto ; 
in  other  words,  administer  hemlock  today 
and  recompense  with  a  statue  tomorrow. 


The  Quizzer  of  Collier's 

Our  dialecticians  of  the  Progressive  school 
have  great  admiration  for  one  another. 
What  one  says  the  others  quote  as  though 
it  were  a  divine  emanation.  In  this  way 
nonsense  receives  wide  and  rapturous  dis- 
semination. As,  for  instance,  the  Norman 
Hapgood  editorial  in  Collier's  quoted  by  the 
Bulletin  the  other  day.  Taking  William 
Barnes  of  New  York  to  task  for  charging 
Roosevelt  with  being  a  demagogue  and  an 
apostle  of  "reckless  change,"  Editor  Hap- 
good wants  to  know  what  the  education 
which  the  New  York  politician  received  at 
Harvard  has  done  for  him.  "Has  it  failed 
to  teach  him,"  the  erudite  of  Collier's  sol- 
emnly demands,  "that  the  United  States  in 
social  adjustment  is  behind  nearly  every 
hiohly  civilized  nation  in  Europe?"  Again: 
"Has  it  failed  to  teach  him  that  .practically 
all  of  what  Mr.  Roosevelt  advocates  has 
been  tried  out  and  every'  item  is  conserva- 
tive in  England,  in  Germany,  in  Denmark, 
in  Italy  or  in  Switzerland?"  Also:  "Does 
Mr.  Barnes  think  he  can  prevent  this  coun- 
try from  taking  part  in  the  march  of  the 
world  conscience?"  Thus  is  Mr.  Barnes 
reproved,  rebuked  and  refuted  according  to 
the   polemic   system   that   was  hammered 


into  Mr.  Hapgood's  noddle  in  the  halcyon 
days  of  his  brilliant  university  career.  It 
is  evident  that  education  has  done  much  for 
the  editor  of  Collier's.  It  has  familiarized 
him  with  the  interrogatory  method  of  ar- 
riving, not  at  truth,  but  at  triumph  over  an 
adversary.  This  method  is  especially  to  be 
recommended  to  editors  of  moderate  men- 
tality, plenty  of  intellectual  dishonesty  and 
some  rhetorical  fluency.  For  the  editor  has 
an  immense  advantage  over  an  adversary. 
He  is  complete  master  of  the  situation,  be- 
ing sole  occupant  of  the  forum.  Every 
question  must  go  unanswered.  He  must  be 
careful  only  to  measure  accurately  the 
stupidity  of  his  readers.  Now  Mr.  Hap- 
good is  somewhat  reckless  in  this  respect. 
It  may  be  true  enough,  as  he  suggests,  that 
the  United  States  in  social  adjustment 
(whatever  that  means)  is  behind  nearly 
every  highly  civilized  nation  in  Europe,  but 
it  is  difficult  to  see  how  this  argues  that  we 
need  Mr.  Roosevelt  to  drive  us  to  the  front. 
If  Editor  Hapgood  means  that  the  United 
States  is  behind  the  civilized  States  of 
Europe  in  the  best  characteristics  of  men 
and  society,  in  the  elements  which  con- 
stitute the  direct  converse  of  rudeness  or 
barbarism,  he  is  not  to  be  gainsaid,  but 
surely  the  Rough  Rider  of  the  range,  the 
standard-bearer  of  the  Bull  Moose  faction, 
the  Mighty  Hunter  whose  hat  is  in  the  ring, 
is  not  the  person  to  be  looked  to  for 
"sweetness  and  light."  If  Mr.  Hapgood 
has  been  reading  any  of  the  leading  news- 
papers of  civilized  Europe  since  the  Chicago 
convention  he  must  be  aware  that  with  re- 
markable unanimity  they  pronounce  Mr. 
Roosevelt  the  most  pernicious  demagogue 
and  dangerous  innovator  that  ever  threat- 
ened the  integrity  of  a  republic.  The 
Chicago  chapter  in  the  Roosevelt  career  was 
an  eye-opener  to  Europe.  Now  as  to  the 
question  whether  Mr.  Barnes  hasn't  learned 
that  practically  all  of  what  Mr.  Roosevelt 
advocates  has  been  tried  out  in  England, 
Germany,  Denmark  and  Italy,  the  truth 
is  that  practically  nothing  advocated  by  him 
with  the  e-xception  of  the  Decalogue  has 
been  tried  out  anywhere.  Surely  the  recall 
of  decisions  is  not  in  operation  in  any  of 
the  civilized  countries  mentioned.  Mr.  Hap- 
good has  been  confounding  Europe  with 
Mexico. 


Perspective  Impressions 


Nat  Goodwin  has  now  reached  the  Angora  cat 
stage — that  is  he  sees  Angora  cats.  Nat  prob- 
ably changes  his  brands  as  he  does  his  wives. 


"I  want  to  show  the  hypocrisy  running  ram- 
pant through  the  country." — Senator  Lorimer. 
Right  there  the  blond  boss  put  his  finger  on  the 
bad  spot  in  the  body  politic. 


Notice  to  Senator  John  D.  Works:  Please  stop 
sending  copies  of  your  "Independent  Health 
Service"  speech  to  this  office.  The  seventeen  so 
far  received  are  clogging  the  waste  paper  basket. 


Would  you  object  to  being  pinched  by  a  lady 
cop? 


What  is  called  the  unrest  of  a  nation  is  in 
reality  a  national  brainstorm. 


"I  did  it"  exclaimed  Theodore  Roosevelt,  point- 
ing with  pride  and  exultation  to  the  downfall 
;ind  humiliation  of  William  Lorimer.  Precisely 
the  same  ecstasy  that  uttered  itself  when  the 
same  proud  one  was  gloating  over  the  shot  in 
the  back  that  laid  a  Spanish  soldier  low. 


Every  time  two  young  fools  marry  on  a  dare 
some  divorce  lawyer  rubs  his  hands  and  chuckles. 


To  perceive  the  burlesque  contradictions  of 
American  politics  is  one  of  the  priceless  gifts  en- 
joyed by  the  amiable  cynic. 


A  Providence  despatch  says,  "When  a  detective 
tried  to  arrest  Annie  Curric,  aged  22  today  on 
a  charge  of  larceny  she  held  him  at  bay  by  dis- 
robing." A  detective  who  permits  himself  to  be 
foiled  in  that  fashion  ought  to  be  dismissed  for 
incompetency. 


6 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


A  Bored  Observer 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  As  one  who  never 
misses  an  issue  of  your  bright  paper  let  me  say 
that  I  admire  your  stand  on  political  questions. 
Your  untiring  persistency  in  smashing  away  at 
the  humbuggery,  the  hypocrisy  and  the  fakery  of 
so-called  Progrcssivism  fills  me  with  delight.  At 
the  same  time  I  don't  see  how  you  keep  up  the 
pace.  Don't  you  ever  get  weary  of  exposing  pre- 
tense, puncturing  buncombe  and  unveiling  the 
hidden  motives  of  the  pseudo  reformers?  I  think 
you  must.  It  seems  to  me  there  must  be  times 
when  you  throw  down  your  pen  in  disgust  and 
throw  up  your  hands  in  fatigue,  saying,  "What's 
the  use?"  Of  course  there  is  a  use,  a  great  and 
good  use  for  all  you  write  on  the  subject,  but 
how  hard  it  must  be  at  times  to  continue  the 
assault  on  popular  purblindness  I  can  judge  from 
my  own  experience.  There  was  a  time  when  I 
was  eager  in  the  fight;  when,  in  my  own  small 
circle,  I  dealt  swashing  blows  for  truth  and  com- 
mon sense.  I  used  to  think  that  I  succeeded  in 
unmasking  some  of  the  pretenders.  But  that 
time  has  passed.  I've  given  up.  "A  plague  on 
both  your  houses"  represents  my  attitude.  I'm 
through.  Let  the  Montagus  and  the  Capulets 
light  it  out  among  themselves.  Let  them  eat  one 
another  like  the  Kilkenny  cats,  for  all  I  care. 


Correspondence 

I'm  bored  with  the  whole  shooting  match.  I've 
come  to  the  conclusion  that  politics  is  like 
Tincombe  Hill.  Do  you  know  the  old  wheeze? 
It  runs  like  this: 

Tincombe  Lane  is  all  uphill. 

Or  downhill,  as  you  take  it; 
You  tumble  up  and  crack  your  crown 

Or  tumble  down  and  break  it. 

Tincombe  Lane  is  crooked  and  straight 

.■\s  pothook  or  as  arrow. 
'Tis  smooth  to  foot,  'tis  full  of  rut, 

'Tis  wide,  and  then  'tis  narrow. 

Tincombe  Lane  is  just  like  life 

From  when  you  leave  your  mother. 
'Tis  sometimes  this,  'tis  sometimes  that, 
'Tis  one  thing  or  the  other. 

Sincerely  yours, 

— A  Blase  Republican. 


The  Moving  Picture  Man  Speaks 
Editor  Town  Talk,  Dear  Sir:  Say,  kiddo,  it  was 
some  class!  I  been  around  some  in  my  day,  but 
believe  muh,  them  nupshals  beat  anything  1  have 
every  saw.  The  bride  was  a  Poughkcepsie  dream, 
and  the  groom — Huh?    What's  a  Poughkcepsie? 


Why,  just  a  bit  above  Auburn.  You  obtain  me, 
Stephen?  Thanks.  As  I  was  saying,  the  groom 
was  there  million.  Never  for  a  minute  let  on  he 
knew  I  was  unwinding  the  film  on  him.  Do  you 
make  me?  Haughty  and  unconscious,  all  through 
the  wedding  stunt.  Of  course  he  knowed  we  was 
making  the  pitchers,  but  he  never  let  on.  I  didn't 
even  have  to  tell  him  to  look  pleasant.  He  en- 
joyed his  wedding  all  through.  But  then  they 
tell  me  he's  been  there  before.  And  say,  them 
bridesmaids  was  swell  dames.  Huh?  No,  they 
wasn't  what  you'd  call  chickens  exactly;  been  out 
of  the  shell  too  long  for  genu-ine  Petalumas,  but 
swell  lookers  just  the  same,  and  the  dresses — 
why  you  couldn't  buy  'em  for  a  month's  salary, 
on  the  square.  But  the  best  of  it  was  the  wed- 
ding breakfast.  They  call  it  breakfast  in  our  set, 
donchakow,  even  if  it  was  a  few  hours  too  late 
for  lunch.  Huh?  Yeh,  some  of  'em  did  get  a  bit 
frisky,  but  I'm  not  a-going  to  give  'em  away.  I 
was  there  to  take  pitchers,  not  to  do  the  bayvard 
stunt.  Huh?  Most  certainly  not!  The  very 
idear!  Of  course  the  Indoor  Yacht  Club  can't 
borry  them  wedding  pitchers.  They  aint  that 
kind  of  pitchers. 

Yours, 

—The  "Movie"  Man. 


Siftings  from  Many  Sources 

Being  a  Brief  Chronicle  of  Significant  Events  the  Wide  World  Over 


French  Race  Suicide  Again 

Paul  Leroy-P)caulieu,  the  eminent  French  econ- 
omist, has  issued  a  striking  appeal  to  Frenchmen 
and  Frenchwomen,  in  which  he  points  out  the 
grave  danger  of  depopulation  and  the  denational- 
ization of  France  by  the  reduced  birth  rate.  Last 
year  the  deaths  exceeded  the  births  in  France 
by  almost  35,000,  and  the  total  number  of  births 
in  1911  was  263,000  less  than  the  annual  birth 
rate  during  the  second  period  of  the  Second  Em- 
pire. M.  Leroy-Beaulieu  declares  that  the  drop 
in  the  French  birth  rate  is  immoral,  due  to  the 
universal  wish  to  limit  the  family  to  the  minimum. 
It  is  not  alone  due  to  the  fear  of  the  expense 
of  bringing  up  children,  but  also,  he  claims,  to 
the  pure  egotism  of  married  couples  who  do  not 
wish  to  be  bothered  by  the  rearing  of  infants. 
The  economist  has  several  remedies  for  what  he 
considers  a  very  threatening  situation  for  the 
future  of  France.  First  he  thinks  it  is  absolutely 
necessary  to  teach  the  Frenchman  that  the  nor- 
mal family  should  include  not  fewer  than  three 
children.  This  teaching  should  begin  in  the 
schools,  both  public  and  denominational,  so  that 
it  may  be  propogated  as  a  truth  essential  to  the 
maintenance  of  the  nation.  Furthermore,  he 
favors  the  adoption  of  a  law,  to  be  applied  with- 
out exception,  providing  that  no  persons  shall 
hold  public  positions  or  be  eligible  for  govcrn- 
nunt  employment  of  any  kind  unless  they  have 
three  children.  The  need  of  the  third  child — that 
is  what  must  be  insisted  upon  throughout  France, 
M.  Leroy-Beaulieu  declares.  He  estimates  that 
of  tiie  average  ten  marriages  usually  one  or  two 
bring  forth  no  children,  while  the  remaining 
couples  content  themselves  with  either  one  or 
two  children.    As  an  additional  encouragement. 


By  Robert  McTavish 

the  economist  recommends  the  establishment  of 
a  system  of  State  premiums. 


New  Seal  has  Forty-eight  Stars 

The  House  of  Representatives  is  to  have  a  new 
great  seal.  The  old  seal  was  adopted  in  1830. 
The  old  seal  bears  twenty-four  stars.  The  new 
one  will  have  forty-eight.  The  score  and  four 
which  make  the  difference  spell  the  nation's 
growth  since  the  time  when  statesmen  wore 
beaver  hats  and  tight  trousers,  came  to  Congress 
in  stage  coaches  and  didn't  have  to  make  speeches 
about  the  right  to  draw  20  cents  a  mile  for  travel- 
ing expenses. 


The  Portuguese  Republic  and  the  Vatican 

What  has  taken  place  between  the  Vatican  and 
the  Republic  of  Portugal  is  most  interesting  and 
instructive,  as  showing  the  trend  of  European 
politics.  When  th-;  house  of  Braganza  was  de- 
throned and  the  republic  proclaimed  in  Lisbon 
in  October,  1910,  complete  separation  was  also 
decreed  between  Church  and  State,  and  the  Por- 
tuguese Embassy  of  the  Vatican  was  suppressed. 
About  a  year  and  a  half  have  now  passed,  and 
without  any  move  on  the  part  of  the  Vatican 
both  the  Senate  and  the  Chamber  of  the  Por- 
tuguese Republic  have  voted  for  the  re-establish- 
ment of  diplomatic  relations  with  the  Pontiff. 
This  would  be  inexplicable  without  knowing  what 
has  been  going  on  behind  the  scenes.  The  men 
w-ho  are  in  power  at  Lisbon  are  not  converted  to 
clericalism,  but  have  come  to  understand  the 
great  danger  that  their  country  is  facing  and  the 
necessity  of  not  creating  more  enemies.  It  has 
come  out  that  one  of  Germany's  greatest  aspira- 


tions is  to  seize  the  Portuguese  colonics  and 
that  England,  notwithstanding  her  traditional 
friendship  for  Portugal,  would  not  have  sufficient 
interest  in  the  question  to  prevent  the  seizure. 
Of  course  Germany,  before  making  the  coup, 
would  have  to  prepare  the  ground,  and  one  of  the 
many  ways  to  reach  her  object  would  have  been 
that  of  taking  advantage  of  the  broken  relations 
between  Church  and  State  in  Portugal.  Consid- 
ering the  w-ay  the  republic  was  treating  the 
Vatican,  the  former  could  not  expect  that  the 
Church,  having  acquired  complete  liberty  of  ac- 
tion, would  send  to  the  Portuguese  colonies 
patriotic  Portuguese  clergy.  On  the  other  han.d, 
it  was  anticipated  that  the  Church  would 
gradually  substitute  for  them  German-speaking 
Portuguese.  Steps  to  gain  this  end  had  already 
been  taken  by  the  German  Government,  whose 
relations  with  the  Vatican  have  been  constantly 
improving,  when  the  politicians  woke  up  in  Lis- 
bon and  saw  the  risk  they  were  running.  They 
now  think  they  have  avoided  the  danger  by  de- 
ciding to  send,  if  not  an  Ambassador,  at  least  a 
Minister  to  the   Holy  See. 


INVITATIONS  MONOGRAMS  CRESTS 

VISITING  CARD  PLATES  ENGRAVED 


ROBERTSON 


UNION  SQUARE  SAN  FRANCISCO 


u  V  .\   912  TOWNTALK  7 

Varied  Types 


LXXXIII— FRANK  C.  DREW 


By  Edward  F.  O'Day 


To  know  a  man  in  his  putilic  relations  is  to  see 
only  one  side  of  him.  It  may  (ir  may  not  be 
the  better,  the  more  important  s'.de;  it  is  seldom 
the  more  interesting. 

Take  Frank  Drew  for  instance.  It  is  very 
well  to  know  Frank  Drew  as  a  member 
of  a  law  firm  and  as  a  business  man  with 
great  lumber  interests.  Those  who  find  delight 
in  such  things  may  appraise  his  standing  at  the 
bar,  his  skill  as  a  financier.  But  you  might  know 
Frank  Drew  as  a  public  man  for  a  long  time,  and 
still  be  ignorant  of  his  ardor  for  Esperanto. 
When  you  learn  that  fact  about  his  private  life 
you  sit  up  and  take  a  notice  of  Frank  Drew  which 
you  would  not  accord  to  his  more  prosaic  ac- 
tivities. There  are  so  many  good  lawyers  and 
able  financiers;  there  are  so  few  Esperantists. 

In  San  Francisco,  aside  from  Frank  Drew,  the 
only  followers  of  Dr.  Zamenhof  whose  names  I 
can  recall  are  former  Judge  Daingerficld  and 
present  Judge  Treadwcll.  But  in  the  city  of 
Athenian  culture  across  the  l!ay  there  is  (|nite  a 
group  which  includes  prominent  railniad  men  and 
civil  engineers.  You  never  know  when  you  are 
going  to  run  across  somebody  who  speaks  the 
ingeniously  constructed  and  thoroughly  prac- 
tical international  language.  That  must  be  part 
of  the  charm  of  mastering  it.  In  this  connec- 
tion Frank  Drew  told  me  a  story. 

"Dr.  Yemans,  a  student  of  Esperanto  who  is 
now  with  the  army  in  Manila,  was  crossing  the 
Atlantic  to  America  at  the  same  time  that  a 
delegation  of  Esperantists  was  journeying  from 
this  country  to  the  Esperanto  Congress  at 
Antwerp.  He  sent  them  a  pleasant  message  in 
Esperanto  by  wireless.  Before  the  delegates  on 
the  other  steamer  had  a  chance  to  reply,  the  wire- 
less operator  who  had  received  the  message 
flashed  an  answer  to  Dr.  Yemans  in  Esperanto, 
stating  that  the  doctor's  and  his  were  the  first 
wireless  messages  in  Esperanto  ever  exchanged 
at  sea.  Now  who  would  expect  to  find  a  wireless 
operator  who  knew  Esperanto?" 

"In  this  connection,"  continued  Drew,  "it  may 
be  mentioned  among  the  advantages  of  Esperanto 
that  if  it  were  adopted  for  the  international  wire- 
less code  there  would  be  no  such  disastrous  mis- 
takes as  occurred  recently  when  the  English,  the 
Japanese  and  the  Norwegian  operators  misun- 
derstood the  messages  which  they  were  exchang- 
ing. 

"Esperanto  supplies  a  common  ground  of  inter- 
course on  which  all  people  can  meet.  In  travel- 
ing it  is  invaluable.  All  over  the  world  there 
are  clubs  or  groups  of  Esperantists,  and  if  the 
traveler  wears  in  his  buttonhole  the  little  green 
star  which  is  the  Esperanto  emblem,  he  will 
come  in  contact  everywhere  with  interesting  peo- 
ple whom  otherwise  he  would  be  unable  to  con- 
verse with. 

"Once  in  Chalons-sur-Marne  I  met  a  French 
army  officer  named  Dr.  Jenny.  He  knew  no 
English  and  at  the  time  I  knew  no  French,  and 
yet  we  had  a  delightful  conversation  for  half 
an  hour  in  Esperanto.  The  first  ten  minutes  of 
our  talk  were  a  bit  unsatisfactory,  but  after  that 
it  was  smooth  sailing. 

"There  is  absolutely  no  other  cominon  means 
of  communication.  During  the  past  few  years  I 
have  corresponded  with  people  who  spoke  twenty- 
one  different  foreign  languages,  but  no  English. 
Using  Esperanto  I  have  been  able  to  exchange 


letters  with  men  whose  native  tongues  were 
French,  German,  Spanish,  Italian,  Portuguese, 
Danish,  Dutch,  Norwegian,  Swedish,  Russian, 
Polish,  Czech,  Dalmatian,  Magyar,  Arabian, 
Syrian,  Chinese,  Slovak,  Javanese,  Hindustance 
and  Grecian.  Without  Esperanto  that  would  be 
impossible. 

"Esperanto  has  come  to  stay.  This  is  par- 
ticularly evident  in  Europe.  You  will  find  Es- 
peranto books  and  pamphlets  at  the  railway 
stations,  especially  in  Russia,  Poland  and  Bo- 
hemia. In  Belgium  the  government  has  en- 
couraged the  study  ever  since  the  Esperanto 
Congress  was  held  in  Antwerp.  In  that  city  the 
policemen  speak  it,  and  so  do  the  conductors 
on  the  street  cars.  The  cars  contain  signs  and 
n(  lices  in  Esperanto. 


Photo,  Vaughan  and  Fraser 


FRANK  C.  DREW 

"More  than  that,  Esperanto  is  the  international 
means  of  communication  used  by  the  anarchists 
of  Europe.  When  Francisco  Ferrer  was  arrested 
by  the  Spanish  authorities  he  had  on  his  person 
a  kodak  and  an  Esperanto  grammar.  Now  if  the 
forces  of  evil  use  Esperanto  to  advance  their 
cause,  it  will  be  necessary  for  the  opposing  forces 
of  good  to  fight  them  with  it.  If  anarchy  is  to 
be  combatted  by  arguments,  pamphlets  and  so 
forth,  Esperanto  must  be  used,  for  there  is  no 
other  way  of  appealing  at  one  and  the  same 
time  to  people  of  difTerent  nationalities.  The 
use  which  the  anarchists  make  of  Esperanto 
shows  that  it  has  ceased  to  be  a  fad;  it  is  an 
eminently  practical  means  of  communication. 

"The  world  is  alive  to  the  need  of  a  universal 
auxiliary  language.  Some  think  that  the  tendency 
is  to  use  French  for  this  purpose.  But  there 
are  serious  objections  to  French.  It  is  impossi- 
ble for  the  ordinary  adult  to  learn  to  pronounce 


French  correctly,  or  even  to  write  it  correctly, 
there  are  so  many  idioms.  The  same  thing  is 
true  of  English.  Both  are  objectionable  too  on 
account  of  international  jealousies.  And  the 
same  thing  applies  to  German.  For  instance, 
would  the  Germans  be  willing  to  use  French? 
Would  the  English  be  willing  to  adopt  German? 

"Esperanto,  on  the  other  hand,  is  easy  to  learn. 
I  am  still  studying  it,  but  I  obtained  a  working 
knowledge  of  it  by  devoting  one  hour  a  night  to 
its  study  for  six  weeks.  At  the  end  of  that  time 
I  could  read  and  write  it  with  a  good  deal  of 
ease. 

"You  see,  there  are  no  idioms  in  Esperanto. 
And  there  will  be  none.  There  are  no  excep- 
tions to  its  grammatical  rules.  It  does  away 
with  irregular  verbs  which  are  such  a  terror  to 
people  attempting  to  learn  French  and  other 
European  languages.  There  is  no  such  difficulty 
as  the  student  has  with  the  German  pronouns 
either. 

"Esperanto  has  a  literature  of  its  own.  I  re- 
call a  novel  called  'The  Pharaoh'  in  three  vol- 
umes which  describes  the  Egyptian  life  of  ancient 
days  with  its  religious  doctrines,  ceremonies  and 
so  on.  Esperanto  is  capable  of  describing  such 
scenes  and  incidents  just  as  minutely  as  any  of 
our  mother  tongues.  It  can  convey  the  various 
shades  of  meaning;  the  delicate  distinctions  be- 
tween our  own  synonyms  can  all  be  expressed. 

"Esperanto  also  has  a  large  translated  liter- 
ature. The  Bible  has  been  translated  into  Es- 
peranto. So  have  a  number  of  Shakespeare's 
plays,  notably  Hamlet,  Julius  Caesar  and  The 
Tempest.  Goldsmith's  She  Stoops  to  Conquer  is 
in  Esperanto;  so  are  Schiller's  dramas  and  many 
Polish  novels.  In  addition  there  are  many 
medical  journals,  mathematical  and  other  scien- 
tific treatises.  The  advantage  of  Esperanto  for 
scientific  works  is  obvious.  How  many  great 
treatises  invaluable  to  physicians  and  others  are 
beyond  the  reach  of  students  because  they  are  in 
a  foreign  tongue!  Sometimes  these  works  are 
not  translated  for  years;  sometimes  the  great  ex- 
pense prevents  them  from  being  translated  at  all. 
If  they  were  written  in  Esperanto,  as  the  scholars 
of  old  wrote  their  books  in  Latin,  they  would  be 
immediately  available  for  all  nations. 

"But  one  of  the  greatest  goods  which  would 
come  out  of  the  use  of  Esperanto  was  that  which 
Dr.  Zamenhof  had  in  mind  when  he  invented  it. 
He  was  a  college  student  at  Warsaw,  and  was 
painfully  aware  of  the  racial,  political  and  re- 
ligious misunderstanding  which  kept  the  students 
in  a  constant  state  of  warfare.    He  came  to  the 

(Continued  on  Page  21.) 


Going  Abroad? 

To  the  Orient? 

To  the  Mediterranean? 

To  the  West  Indies? 

To  South  America? 

To  Egypt  and  the  Nile? 

To  London,  Paris,  Berlin  and  Italy? 

Around  the  World? 

Or  a  flight  in  a  Zeppelia  Ainhip? 

Get  prosranu  of  our  Famoui  Pteaiure  Cruiae* 
Handioinely  illuttated  pamphleti  gralii. 

HAMBVRG- AMERICAN  LINE 

160  POWELL  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


8 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


The  Last  Rapture 


Before  the  war  Colonel  Champlenac  lived  at 
Ban-Saint-Martin,  quite  at  the  end  of  the  modest 
little  street  which  goes  up  towards  Plappcville 
between  the  vines  and  the  iron  gratings.  He 
lived  in  a  clean  little  white  house  with  a  tiled 
roof,  upon  which  flocks  of  pigeons  disported  them- 
selves, with  a  garden  scarcely  bigger  than  a  nap- 
kin spread  out  to  dry  in  the  sun,  a  garden  in 
which  chimps  of  rose-bushes  marked  out  the 
lawn. 

He  was  a  tall  old  man,  dry  and  thin  as  a 
vagabond's  stafif,  with  a  straight-cut  moustache 
which  marked  with. a  white  line  his  long,  wrinkled 
face,  the  stretched  skin  of  which  had  the  tawny 
hues  of  old  parchment. 

He  limped  upon  his  left  leg,  especially  in  rainy 
weather;  he  had  the  rough  air  of  a  trooper  who 
has  played  his  life  fifty  times  as  one  throws  dice, 
and  he  constantly  took  snufT  from  a  gold  snuflF- 
box  which  the  Emperor  had  given  him  in  the 
field-hospital  after  the  battle  of  Champaubert. 
He  spoke  in  a  sharp,  strong  voice,  as  if  he  were 
still  shouting  his  orders  in  the  midst  of  a  furious 
cannonade. 

He  had  as  many  scars  as  campaigns,  and  yet 
held  his  own  right  well  and  made  death  mark 
time — as  he  was  wont  to  say,  laughing  his  great 
merry  laugh. 

Of  all  the  pensioners — the  veterans  covered 
with  chevrons,  who  had  taken  part  in  the  great 
epic,  and  who  now  made  much  of  themselves, 
sitting  close  together  in  their  corner  of  the  Cafe 
Colignon — of  all  these  the  Colonel  seemed  the 
strongest  and  soundest;  and  when  he  was  a 
little  warmed  by  stirring  up  the  far-off  memories 
of  his  glorious  marches,  when  he  had  drunk  a 
little  more  than  usual,  he  would  start  up  like  an 
old  cavalry  horse  who  suddenly  hears  the  familiar 
trumpet-call,  and  would  swear  that  he  would 
return  to  service  upon  the  first  occasion  which 
offered.  He  would  take  down  his  heavy  cuiras- 
sier's sword,  which  had  been  hacked  and  red- 
dened in  so  many  battles.  They  would  see  that 
Colonel  Eusebe  Champlenac  was  no  more  broken- 
down  than  any  conscript  twenty  years  old,  and 
that  he  could  still  sit  in  his  saddle  and  charge 
at  the  head  of  his  troop  as  in  the  good  old  days. 

These  heroic  boasts,  these  oaths  of  an  old 
trooper  who  dealt  out  his  words  like  trumpet- 
calls,  woke  up  all  the  others,  filled  them  with  a 
contagious  intoxication,  made  young  again  all 
those  poor  old  cracked  heads;  and  when  they 
went  home  afterwards,  still  full  of  illusions  and 
pursuing  their  dreams,  they  rummaged  in  the 
bottoms  of  closets,  brought  out  the  uniforms 
carefully  kept  as  relics,  put  them  on  and  put  on 
also  their  tarnished  epaulets.  Then  they  viewed 
themselves  in  the  glass  for  a  long  time,  without 
seeing  that  their  figures  were  bowed  down,  that 
they  had  acquired  stomachs,  and  that  in  these 
laced  and  moth-eaten  garments,  with  their  big 
shakos  and  broken  plumes,  they  looked  like  the 
carnival  masqueraders  whom  the  street  boys  fol- 
low with  mocking  shouts. 

This  close  of  life,  haunted  by  memories,  flowed 
quietly  along,  tranquil  and  almost  mechanical. 
The  few  sous  which  he  possessed,  together  with 
his  pension,  enabled  the  Colonel  to  have  good 
wine  in  his  cellar,  to  entertain  a  guest  now  and 
then,  to  be  always  well  clad  in  his  long  coats, 
buttoned  up  to  the  throat  in  the  old-fashioned 
style,  and  to  doze  at  home,  with  his  old  relics, 
his  old  maid-servant,  Nanine,  and  his  old  friends, 
in  an  idleness  of  mind  and  body  which  nothing 


By  Rene  Maizeroy 

disturbed,  neither  disquieting  anxiety  for  the 
morrow,  nor  the  torments  of  a  fierce  struggle 
with  poverty,  nor  the  bitterness  of  regret-S. 

He  had  only  one  relative,  a  sister  who  lived 
in  Paris.  Upon  certain  anniversaries  they  wrote 
to  each  other,  more  from  habit  than  from  af- 
fection, and  they  never  saw  each  other,  both 
having  that  instinctive  selfishness,  that  dread  of 
traveling,  which  keeps  old  folks  at  home.  How- 
ever, when  the  terrible  battle-storm  which  had 
laid  waste  the  country  was  at  last  over.  Mile. 
Hortense  Champlenac,  receiving  no  tidings  and 
guessing  all  that  her  brother  must  be  suffering 
in  his  solitude,  the  tragic  overthrow  of  his  be- 
liefs, the  wound  which  his  patriotism  had  re- 
ceived, this  black  cloud  of  defeats  which  covered, 
like  a  pall,  the  splendid  visions  of  the  past — 
considering  these  things,  she  packed  a  few  gar- 
ments in  a  trunk  and  hastened  to  pay  a  visit  to 
the  Colonel. 

She  found  him  looking  old,  dejected,  sitting 
in  his  big  arm-chair,  from  which  he  did  not  rise 
without  moaning  like  a  sick  man,  as  if  he  were 
paralyzed.  He  no  longer  went  out;  he  had  for- 
bidden Nanine  to  open  the  blinds;  he  closed 
his  ears  in  a  kind  of  rage,  so  as  not  to  hear  the 
heavy  steps  of  the  German  sentries  who  passed 
through  the  little  street.  From  time  to  time  he 
shook  his  fist  at  some  imaginary  enemy;  his 
whole  body  trembled,  shaken  by  furious  anger; 
and  he  cried  in  his  rough  voice:  "Blackguards, 
blackguards !" 

Ah!  The  gallant  discourses  at  the  Cafe 
Colignon,  the  youthful  thoughts,  the  outbursts 
of  enthusiasm,  the  little  glasses  which  clinked  to- 
gether, the  blustering  plans  which  had  frightened 
the  plump  cashier,  seated  at  her  counter  and 
silent  behind  her  open  account-book  and  her 
plates,  upon  which  the  pieces  of  sugar  were  ar- 
ranged in  rows!  How  they  had  humiliated  tiic 
wretched  people!  How  the  people  had  suffered 
during  those  days  when  the  cannon  never  ceased 
to  growl,  and  in  which  they  were  caught  in  a 
network  which  still  grew  tighter  round  them 
day  by  day,  while  they  were  crushed  by  famine 
and  by  hatred! 

Then  the  downfall  had  come!  That  beautiful 
army,  which  had  always  been  victorious,  was 
decimated,  dragged  like  a  sick  herd  into  Ger- 
many, the  horses  turned  loose  on  the  outskirts 
of  Metz,  the  flags  burnt  or  surrendered,  and 
hope  failing.  Bad  tidings  followed  each  other, 
and  then  the  peace  which  dismembered  the  land 
like  a  dead  beast  of  prey. 

These  strokes  had  been  like  the  terrible  blows 
of  a  hammer  falling  upon  the  Colonel's  worn- 
out  brain,  following  each  other  in  an  unfailing 
procession.  The  finale  came  when  there  was  im- 
posed upon  him  the  humiliation  of  being  forced 
to  entertain  some  of  the  Bavarian  cavalrymen 
in  his  own  home,  to  be  the  host  of  those  men 
whom  he  had  formerly  ordered  as  a  master; 
in  the  midst  of  his  dear  relics,  arms  hanging  upon 
the  walls,  portraits  of  marshals,  tattered  stan- 
dards riddled  by  bullets,  to  see  these  lumbering 
conquerors  who  spat  upon  his  floors,  who  jab- 
bered a  hateful  language,  who  stole  everything 
that  they  found,  and  who  laughed  in  his  face  with 
a  heavy,  brutal  laughter. 

Hortense  hastened  to  snatch  the  Colonel  from 
this  cruel  contemplation,  which  was  killing  him 
like  a  cleverly  protracted  torture.  She  took  hiin 
off  to  Paris  with  her.  He  made  no  resistance, 
and  let  himself  be  taken  away  by  these  two 


women,  his  sister  and  Nanine,  like  a  little  child. 
He  did  not  weep  when  he  heard  the  gate  close 
behind  him.  He  did  not  even  turn  his  head 
sadly  to  take  a  last  look  at  the  white  front  of 
his  house,  at  the  rose-bushes  which  the  butter- 
flies surrounded  with  a  fluttering  of  white  wings. 
He  said  not  a  word,  sad  or  gay  or  anxious. 
Only,  at  times,  his  cry  of  rage  contracted  his 
lips:  "Blackguards,  blackguards!" 

It  was  not  insanity,  but  a  suspension  of  his 
being,  an  absolute  failure  of  all  his  powerful 
faculties,  something  like  death  without  being 
dead.  In  their  small  apartment  on  the  Rue  Tur- 
bigo,  the  old  man  remained  prostrate  for  days, 
watching  through  the  window-panes  the  move- 
ments of  the  pedestrians  and  of  the  carriages. 
He  did  not  reply  to  the  questions  addressed  to 
him.  They  rolled  him  from  room  to  room  in  a 
wheel-chair.  The  years  followed  each  other  with- 
out bringing  any  change  in  his  condition,  without 
quickening  this  extinct  mind  or  reviving  these 
broken  forces. 

One  summer  evening,  a  stifling  evening  in 
July,  when  Nanine  had  propped  him  up  on  the 
pillows  by  the  window-sill,  the  old  man  sud- 
denly started  and,  before  the  sight  which  met  his 
eyes,  seemed  to  be  miraculously  restored.  He 
leaned  forward  to  see  better,  to  see  everything, 
and  in  an  eager  voice  he  called  to  his  sister: 

"Little  sister!  Little  sister,  look  there!  Sec 
those  flags  everywhere,  those  lanterns — " 

In  the  golden  mist  of  the  twilight  which  was 
covering  the  depths  below  with  a  vague  haze, 
from  all  the  windows,  from  all  the  balconies, 
floated  the  tri-colored  flags,  joyous,  flaunting, 
waving  before  the  least  breath  of  air  which  came 
from  the  Seine.  The  radiant  hues,  melted  to- 
gether, shone  like  a  bunch  of  rockets  and  dif- 
fused through  all  this  tranquil  nightfall  a  fairy 
light,  red,  white  and  blue.  The  shrill  cries,  the 
shouting  of  songs,  all  the  gayety  of  a  careless, 
happy  people,  rose  up  from  the  swarming  street, 
rose  from  the  four  corners  of  Paris  like  the 
heavy  sound  of  a  fabulous  tide.  Now,  standing 
erect,  no  longer  trembling  upon  his  legs,  drawing 
himself  up  to  his  full  height,  the  Colonel  strove 
to  understand,  brought  together  the  confused 
ideas  scattered  in  his  brain,  restrained  with  his 
hand  the  wild  beating  of  his  heart.  A  holiday, 
the  flags  hoisted,  their  glory  hovering  over  the 
crowds,  the  salvos  of  artillery  sounding  above  the 
triumphal  music — all  these  things  could  only  mark 
the  end  of  a  victorious  war,  could  only  be  in 
honor  of  the  armies  returning  from  the  frontier. 

"Little  sister,  you  are  hiding  something  from 
me.  We  have  beaten  them,  have  we  not?  We 
have  retaken  Metz  and  Strasburg  from  them, 
and  have  swept  away  all  those  vermin?" 


(Continued  on  Page  21.) 


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July  20.  1912  TOWN  TALK 

Poems  About  San  Francisco 


(Ralpl 
Cisco  newspaperman 


E.    Renaud    the  author  of  the  following  excellent  parody,  was  for  many  years  a  well  known  San  Fran- 
.aperman.    Less   than   a   year  ago   he  left   this  city   for  the  larger  field  of  New   York     The  ••Refueees- 
Ruba.yat      was   wntten    very   shortly   after  the   disaster   of  April,    1906,    and    was    published   in   the    Bulletin  Pro- 
of the  F^"[^:    ^t""  ^J^%^"'^  "ked  it  so  much  that  he  declared  he  would  embalm  it  in  the  pages  of  his  great  History 


XLIX— REFUGEES'  RUBAIYAT 
By  Ralph  E.  Renaud 


I 

Wake!  for  the  Shock  which  scattered  into  flight 
The  sleepers  in  their  underclothes  bedight 
Has  raised  the  roof  and  brought  the  chimneys  down 
And  given  Mrs.  Grundy  such  a  fright. 

II 

Before  the  glimmer  of  the  flames  had  died 
Methought  a  Voice  within  the  Tavern  cried, 
"When  all  the  bottles  are  set  up  within, 
Why  lags  the  thirsty  traveler  outside?" 

Ill 

But  no  cork  popped,  and  those  who  stood  before 
The  Tavern  shouted,  "Open,  then,  the  door!" 
Yet  still  the  stern  policeman  barred  the  way. 
And  still  the  thirsty  refugees  foreborc. 

IV 

Ah,  not  a  drop  that  from  our  cups  we  threw 
For  earth  to  drink  of  but  we  keenly  rue; 
To  quench  this  inner,  unextinguished  fire 
What  profits  ginger  ale  or  iron  brew? 

V 

Would  but  this  desert  of  the  barroom  yield 
One  glimpse — if  dimly,  yet  indeed  revealed! 
But  posted  on  the  swinging  door  appears 
The  Mayor's  proclamation — unrepealed! 

VI 

Ah,  sadly  pour  the  ginger  pop  which  clears 
The  toper's  eye  despite  protesting  tears. 
Tomorrow!    Why,  tomorrow  he  may  be 
In  roaring  Oakland,  throwing  dice  for  beers. 


VII 

The  seismograph  but  writes,  and  having  writ, 

The  scientists  can't  seem  to  make  it  quit. 

And  yet  how  comforting  these  daily  quakes 

Which  soothe  the  nerves  and  calm  the  temper — NIT! 

VIII 

A  can  of  corned  beef  underneath  the  bough, 
A  coffee  pot,  a  loaf  of  bread— and  Thou 
Beside  me  cooking  in  a  vacant  lot. 
Ah,  wilderness  were  Paradise  enow. 

IX 

A  moment's  halt — a  momentary  taste 
Of  army  rations  o'er  the  camp  fire  placed. 
And  then  the  weary  refugee  creeps  back 
The  route  he  took  in  such  unseemly  haste. 

X 

Think,  in  the  battered  caravanserai 

They  called  the  Palace  no  one  needs  to  pay. 

Now  anyone  can  run  a  hotel  bill 

And  pitch  his  tent  where  once  the  clerk  got  gay. 

XI 

They  say  the  homeless  and  the  hoboes  keep 
The  courts  where  Nob  Hill  gloried  and  drank  deep. 
And  while  the  bread  line  lasts  the  millionaire 
Rubs  elbows  with  the  grimy  chimney  sweep. 

XII 

Ah.  Love,  could  you  and  I  with  Fate  conspire 
To  wreck  this  sorry  scheme  of  things  entire — 
If  we  would  shatter  it  to  bits — why,  then 
We'd  surely  choose  an  earthquake  and  a  fire! 


Ruef  a  Frost 

Thus  far  Mr.  Abe  Ruef  has  not  made  good 
from  the  standpoint  of  yellow  journalism.  Up 
to  Monday  of  this  week  his  autobiography  has 
been  flat,  stale  and  unprofitable.  He  has  not 
kept  the  town  on  the  qui  vive.  There  has  been 
nothing  like  breathless  interest  in  his  narrative. 
The  circulation  that  Donald  Lowrie  stimulated 
till  Publisher  Crothers  almost  died  with  elation 
has  been  steadily  dropping  back  to  normal,  and 
though  Publisher  Crothers  has  kept  on  posting 
the  figures  he  is  about  to  utter  a  Macedonian 
cry  for  an  Alfred  David  witness  of  the  Rider- 
hood  type.  It  is  no  secret  that  Editor  Older  has 
been  much  disgruntled.  Day  after  day  he  has 
prodded  his  San  Quentin  correspondent  in  the 


J.  C.  WILSON  &  CO. 

/New  York  Stock  Exchange 
Members^  Cotton  Exchange 

j  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
vThe  Stock  and  Bond  Exchange,  S.  F. 

Main   Office— MILLS   BUILDING,   San  Francisco 

Branch  Offices — Los  Angeles,  San  Diego,  Coronado 
Beach,  Portland,  Ore.,  Seattle,  Wash,  Vancouver,  B.  C. 


The  Spectator 

hope  of  inducing  him  to  come  through  with  some 
intimate  details  of  a  really  sensational  character, 
but  Ruef  has  proved  obstinate.  He  has  been 
going  through  the  same  experience  that  he  so 
graphically  describes  in  the  affidavit  which  he 
made  when  the  immunity  contract  was  broken. 
Expostulated  with  to  put  a  little  ginger  into  his 
narrative  he  has  responded  with  a  lot  of  verbiage 
about  his  own  wonderful  achievements  as  a 
political  strategist.  Indeed,  he  has  deftly  em- 
ployed the  Bulletin  as  a  means  of  glorifying  him- 
self and  swatting  the  people  who  have  been  try- 
ing to  get  him  out  of  jail.  He  has  told  us  that 
during  Schmitz's  first  term  in  office  the  attacks 
made  on  him  were  inspired  by  a  desire  to  destroy 
the  Union  Labor  party.  It  was  the  Bulletin, 
be  it  remembered,  that  made  most  of  the  attacks. 
Ruef  has  pictured  himself  as  a  public  spirited 
citizen  to  whom  we  are  indebted  for  averting 
serious  labor  troubles,  but  he  has  said  nothing 
of  his  proposal  to  Rudolph  Spreckels  to  "tie  up 
the  whole  city"  and  scare  ofif  bond  buyers.  Ruef 
is  not  confessing  anything  that  would  be  dis- 
cordant with  the  rhapsody  of  self-laudation  that 
runs  through  his  serial  story. 


A  Johnsonite  Crucified 

What  Ruef  has  told  us  about  his  employment 
as  attorney  for  public  service  corporations  is  not 
new.  Nor  is  it  untrue.  But  the  story  is  not 
satisfactory  to  the  men  who  prosecuted  the  graft 
cases.  It  was  for  sticking  to  that  story,  for  not 
interlarding  it  with  a  few  misrepresentations  cal- 
culated to  support  scores  of  indictments,  that  the 
immunity  contract  was  broken.  So  the  Bulletin 
has  kindly  enabled  Ruef  to  make  a  liar  of  the 
Bulletin,  for,  of  course  the  Bulletin  is  now  en- 
dorsing Ruef's  story.  Also  the  Bulletin  has  en- 
abled Ruef  to  crucify  one  of  the  warmest  friends 
of  the  Johnson   administration,   a  distinguished 


On  July  1,  1912 
We  will  move  our  offices  to 
410  MONTGOMERY  ST.         San  Francisco 
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10 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


civic  patriot  who  is  now  one  of  Governor  John- 
son's jobholders,  no  less  a  personage  than  the 
Hon.  George  C.  Pardee.  The  chapters  on  the 
Tartuffe  of  Oakland  are  the  most  interesting  of 
all  of  Ruef's  contributions.  They  were  read  with 
something  of  satisfaction  in  Town  Talk's  office 
because  they  are  corroborative  of  much  that  haS 
been  said  in  these  columns  with  reference  to 
the  great  man  who  was  "turned  down"  by  the 
Santa  Cruz  convention. 


Pardee  and  the  Octopus 

For  having  "turned  down"  Dr.  Pardee  the 
Santa  Cruz  convention  is  remembered  by  the 
dear  people  as  the  most  infamous  body  that  ever 
transacted  any  political  business  in  this  country — 
only  up  to  the  time,  to  be  sure,  that  Roosevelt 
was  "turned  down"  in  Chicago.  The  perform- 
ance at  Santa  Cruz  was  iniquitous  because  Dr. 
Pardee  was  a  reformer,  and  like  the  Colonel  he 
was  the  implacable  enemy  of  the  bosses.  Now  we 
learn,  thanks  to  the  Bulletin,  that  Abe  Ruef  was 
a  most  welcome  guest  beneath  the  Pardee  roof- 
tree,  at  the  Pardee  fireside,  in  the  very  heart  of 
the  Pardee  family.  We  learn,  thanks  to  the  Bul- 
letin, that  Pardee  was  supported  by  the  Octopus, 
but  that  in  the  hope  of  cancelling  his  obligations 
he  affected  the  suspicion  that  the  beast  had  been 
disloyal  to  him,  and  that  Ruef  had  to  give  him  the 
assurance  that  the  S.  P.  put  up  large  wads  of 
money  for  his  campaign  expenses.  What  a 
luminous  sidelight  is  thus  thrown  on  one  of  our 
typical  reformers!  Here  is  a  man  who  has  been 
posing  as  a  victim  of  Southern  Pacific  vengeance. 
H  the  Southern  Pacific  put  him  in  office  surely 
the  Southern  Pacific  ought  not  to  be  execrated 
for  kicking  him  out  of  office.  It  appears  from 
Ruef's  story  that  Dr.  Pardee  is  doubly  obligated 
to  the  Southern  Pacific.  He  is  indebted  to  the 
Southern  Pacific  for  a  great  honor  he  once  re- 
ceived, and  he  is  indebted  to  the  Southern  Pa- 
cific for  the  office  he  now  holds.  For  if  the 
Southern  Pacific  had  not  kicked  him  out  of 
office  he  would  be  bearing  its  brand  today.  The 
Southern  Pacific  made  a  reformer  out  of  him  in 
the  way  that  most  reformers  are  made,  and  as 
a  reformer  he  became  eligible  to  the  favor  of 
Reformer  Johnson. 


There  Was  No  Flag 

That  Abe  Ruef  is  showing  considerable  talent 
as  a  writer  of  romance  is  the  opinion  of  some 
who  are  able  to  check  up  from  memory  the  in- 
accuracies in  his  published  story.  A  politician 
with  a  keen  memory  who  has  at  his  finger-ends 
the  details  of  every  political  meeting  held  "south 
of  the  slot"  for  twenty-five  years  told  me  the 
other  day  that  Ruef's  story  about  wrapping  the 
American  flag  around  Pardee  to  prevent  the 
crowd  from  attacking  him  was  fiction  unadulter- 
ated by  any  element  of  truth.  "I  remember  that 
meeting  well,"  he  said.  "Ruef's  crowd  was 
pretty  nervous  when  Pardee  entered  the  meeting 
place,  but  there  was  no  danger  of  personal  vio- 
lence, and  there  was  not  much  noise  until  Pete 
Kelly  in  announcing  that  Mayor  Schmitz  was  for 
Pardee  mispronounced  the  mayor's  name  rid- 
iculously by  a  slip  of  the  tongue.  That  started 
the  uproar,  principally  of  laughter.  The  noise 
continued  when  Pardee  appeared,  and  there  were 
some  hisses.  Congressman  Julius  Kahn  was  with 
Pardee,  and  there  was  considerable  curiosity  as 
to  what  he  would  do.  Julius  had  never  been 
hissed  during  his  political  career.  Without  hes- 
itating he  sprang  to  the  front  of  the  platform, 
told  the  crowd  how  the  Republican  party  had 
built  the  city  a  Postoffice  on  the  lot  where  soup 
kitchens  stood  during  the  Democratic  administra- 
tion, and  held  the  crowd  without  difficulty.  He 
was  applauded  when  he  got  through.  Then  Par- 
dee spoke.    But  there  was    no  American  flag 


wrapped  around  him.  Ruef  invented  that  little 
touch  of  color." 


World's  Fair  Progress 

The  work  on  the  World's  Fair  seems  to  be 
progressing  very  satisfactorily.  The  filling-in  of 
the  water  lots  goes  along  at  a  good  pace,  and 
pretty  soon  the  fence  around  the  exposition 
grounds  will  be  in  course  of  construction.  That 
fence  will  look  like  business,  and  will  no  doubt 
silence  the  few  grumblers  who  think  that  the 
Fair  is  not  going  ahead  rapidly  enough.  Mean- 
while the  various  States  are  picking  out  the  sites 
for  their  buildings.  Fifteen  States  and  territories, 
including  Hawaii  and  the  Philippines,  have  al- 
ready chosen  the  spots  where  they  will  display 
their  resources  in  1915.  Before  the  month  is 
ended  the  first  foreign  country  will  have  its  com- 
missioners in  San  Francisco  for  the  same  pur- 
pose. That  country  is  Japan  which  has  despatched 
three  representatives  to  this  city. 


Hiram  Not  in  Evidence 

Governor  Johnson  is  very  sorry  he  attacked  the 
officials  of  the  World's  Fair,  and  has  let  -  them 
know  as  much.  But  he  doesn't  take  any  part  in 
exposition  business.  There  has  been  no  direct 
communication  between  him  and  the  exposition 
officials  since  the  clash  which  occurred  in  the 
primary  campaign.  He  has  not  honored  the  head- 
quarters in  Pine  street  with  his  presence.  It's 
doubtful  whether  he  has  ever  gone  out  to  Harbor 
View  to  look  things  over  since  the  work  began. 
He  didn't  even  take  the  trouble  to  extend  the 
hand  of  welcome  to  Governor  John  K.  Tencr  of 
Pennsylvania  who  was  here  over  the  Fourth  of 
July  to  pick  out  a  site  for  the  Keystone  btatc 
building.  Governor  Tener  chose  the  site  on  July 
5,  and  naturally  the  occasion  was  a  ceremonious 
one.  But  Governor  Johnson  was  not  present. 
Then  there  was  a  reception  to  Governor  Tener 
at  the  Fairmont.  On  this  occasion  also  Governor 
Johnson  did  not  put  in  an  appearance.  Governor 
Tener  paid  a  visit  to  the  Elks  Club  and  to  the 
Bohemian  Club.  At  both  of  these  places  Gov- 
ernor Johnson  was  conspicuous  by  his  absence. 
No  doubt  he  was  too  busy  attending  to  the  interests 
the  Bull  Moose  party  in  California,  Besides, 
Governor  Tener  is  not  a  Progressive.  He  be- 
longs to  that  wing  of  the  party  which  Governor 
Johnson  is  so  fond  of  calling  "thieves"  and 
"bandits." 


To  Celebrate  Magna  Charta 

On  June  15,  1215,  bad  King  John  met  his 
barons  on  the  field  of  Runnymede  and  gave  Magna 
Charta  to  the  people  of  England.  So  during  the 
Exposition  the  English-speaking  world  will  cel- 
ebrate the  seven  hundredth  anniversary  of  the 
Great  Charter  of  liberties.  It  is  proposed  to  have 
a  special  celebration  of  this  anniver.sary  at  our 
World's  Fair.  The  plan  is  to  invite  the  hundred 
best  legal  minds  of  the  world  to  meet  in  con- 
vention in  San  Francisco  and  to  consider  ways 
and  means  of  uplifting  the  judiciary  and  improv- 
ing legal  proceedure.  When  this  convention  ol 
one  hundred  makes  its  report,  the  idea  is  to  sub- 
mit it  to  a  great  gathering  of  other  distinguished 
lawyers  for  their  approval  or  disapproval.  In 
this  way  the  best  legal  minds  of  the  world  will 
be  trained  upon  problems  of  immense  importance, 
and  no  doubt  far-reaching  reforms  will  thus 
come  out  of  San  Francisco.  In  addition  to  this, 
it  is  proposed  that  a  great  historical  pageant  of 
Runnymede  be  prepared  for  the  entertainment  of 
ordinary  people  who  cannot  be  expected  to 
take  an  absorbing  interest  in  the  deliberations  of 
the  lawyers'  convention.  The  plans  for  this  great 
commemoration  of  Magna  Charta  have  not  been 
worked  out  in  detail,  but  no  doubt  we  shall  hear 
from  John  Brisben  Walker,  the  director  of  pub- 
licity, on  the  matter  in  due  time. 


15  Cents 

IS  the  Cost  of  th  c  one  soap 

so  perfect  that  you  ought  to  have 
it   in   daily    use.      It  beautifies, 
cleanses,  economizes.    There  is  no 
waste  in 

Pears* 
S  GAP 

  /Sc.  a  Cahe  for  the  Vnscentfd 


J.  B.  PON        J.  BERGICZ        C.  M.MI.HEBUAU 
C.   LALANNE  COUTARD 

Bergez  -  Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE  DOG 

CO. 

HOTEL  AND  RESTAURANT 

Music  and  Entertainment  Every  Evening 
415-421  BUSH  STREET  SAN  FRANCISCO 

(Above  Kearny) 
Exchange,  Douglas  2411 


LUNCH  75c  REGULAR  DINNER  $1.00 

Short  order*  at  all  hours.     Muaic  every  evening. 
Banquet  HalL    Seating  Capacity  800. 


Techau  Tavern 

Cor.  Eddy  and  Powell  Streets 
SAN  FRANCISCO 

Douglas  4700        PHONES :      Home  C  34 1 7 

A  High  Class  Family  Cafe 

A  dainty  lunch  served  gratuitously  to  ladies  every 
day  during  shopping  hours,  between 
3:30  and  5:00  p.  m. 

UNDER  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF 

A.  C.  MORRISSON 


Jules  Restaurant 

Special  Lunches  50c  or  a  la  Carte 
Ladies'  Grill  and  Rooms  for  Parties 

Regular  French  Dinner  with  Wine,  $1.00 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Muaic 

MONADNOCK  BUILDING 

NEXT  TO  PALACE  HOTEL 
Phone  Kearnr  1812 
ALL  CARS  PASS  THE  DOOR       ELEVATOR  SERVICE 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


11 


Percy  Distinguishes 

When  our  ingenious  city  attorney,  Percy  Long, 
was  called  upon  to  justify  the  employment  of  a 
New  York  expert  to  draw  up  a  schedule  of  street 
railway  improvements  for  the  municipality,  he 
pointed  out  that  the  hiring  of  a  non-resident 
would  not  be  against  the  provisions  of  the  Charter 
because  such  a  man  was  not  an  "employe"  in 
the  meaning  of  the  Charter  but  merely  a  "con- 
tractor." A  contractor,  according  to  Percy,  is  a 
man  who  issues  "special  orders,"  not  necessarily 
a  man  who  bids  on  city  work.  But  when  "Teddy" 
Vogt  who  lives  across  the  bay  was  a  candidate 
for  the  position  of  municipal  orchestra  leader, 
and  it  was  deemed  inexpedient  to  give  him  the 
job,  Percy  found  that  an  orchestra  leader  was  a 
city  employe  and  must  therefore  live  in  the  city. 
Vogt's  friends  tried  to  show  that  the  position  was 
that  of  a  contractor.  Did  not  an  orchestra  leader 
issue  "special  orders"  to  his  musicians?  But  there 
was  nothing  doing.  Percy  interpreted  the 
Charter  so  as  to  bar  out  "Teddy."  Perhaps  he 
thought  Vogt's  friends  were  "kidding"  him. 


The  Nevada  Apex  Case 

In  Carson  City  they  talk  of  nothing  these  days 
except  the  trial  of  the  Apex  case  in  which  the 
owners  of  the  Mammoth  National  and  National 
mines  are  lined  up  against  one  another  for  a 
fight  to  the  finish.  Carson  has  never  before  seen 
such  a  gathering  of  legal  luminaries  and  minera- 
logical  scientists.  The  Mammoth  National  mine 
is  controlled  by  a  group  of  Californians,  mostly 
millionaires,  which  includes  Will  Tevis,  R.  G. 
and  Al  Hanford,  Charles  Holbrooke  Jr.,  William 
McGuire,  A.  C.  Eisen  and  Robert  Cords  Jr.  The 
case  is  being  handled  for  them  by  W.  H.  Metson 
of  this  city.  With  Metson  in  Carson  is  his 
secretary,  Miss  Ryan,  herself  a  lawyer,  who  ap- 
pears in  the  court  room  every  day  with  her 
stenographer  and  takes  a  lively  interest  in  the 
case.  Needless  to  say,  the  judge,  the  opposing 
lawyers  and  the  spectators  take  a  lively  interest 
in  Miss  Ryan.  Rufus  Thayer  is  associated  with 
Metson  in  the  handling  of  the  case.  Among  the 
experts  retained  by  the  local  people  are  Professor 
Lawson  of  the  University  of  California  and  Pro- 
fessor Jones  of  the  University  of  Nevada.  These 
and  other  scientists  are  receiving  an  honorarium 
of  one  hundred  dollars  a  day,  and  it  is  conceded 
that  they  are  all  earning  their  money,  for  Apex 
litigation  is  most  complicated  and  the  present 
case  is  one  of  the  most  intricate  of  its  kind.  The 
National  mine  is  controlled  by  a  group  of  capit- 
alists with  headquarters  in  Chicago.  They  are 
represented  by  W.  H.  Dickson  of  Salt  Lake,  an 
attorney  who  has  the  reputation  or  Tiefng  one 
the  best  authorities  on  mining  law  in  the  world. 
George  W.  Bartlett  of  Nevada,  former  Congress- 
man, is  his  associate.  The  National  people  have 
matched  the  array  of  scientists  assemtired  by  the 
Mammoth  National  owners,  and  the  case  is  in 


reality  a  battle  of  highly  specialized  scientific 
testimony.  The  local  men  occupy  thirty-three 
rooms  in  one  of  Carson's  hotels,  and  the  fight 
is  costing  them  thousands  of  dollars  every  day  it 
continues.  And  the  lawyers'  fees  will  be  tre- 
mendous. But  the  stake  is  a  large  one.  If  the 
local  men  win,  it  will  mean  many  millions  to 
them,  for  the  National  mine  has  taken  at  least 
fourteen  millions  out  of  what  is  claimed,  in  pa;t, 
as  Mammoth  National  ground.  On  the  other 
hand,  if  they  lose  they  will  at  least  gain  two 
million  dollars. 


The  Split  in  the  French  Colony 

There  were  two  celebrations  of  the  Fall  of 
the  Bastile  in  this  city  last  Sunday.  The  French 
colony  is  split  into  two  factions,  and  there  is 
so  much  bitterness  that  a  harmonious  celebration 
of  the  whole  colony  under  one  roof  was  im- 
possible. So  the  adherents  of  one  faction  cele- 
brated the  great  day  in  the  Sutter-street  Pa- 
vilion with  dear  old  Fuzzy  Wuzzy  as  the  prin- 
cipal speaker,  while  the  adherents  of  the  other 
faction  filled  Scottish  Rite  Hall  and  listened  to 
Supervisor  Caglie  ri  and  Mayor  Stitt  Wilson  of 
Berkeley.  Henri  Merou,  the  French  consul, 
refused  to  take  sides,  and  cut  the  Gordian  knot 
of  his  difficult  position  by  refusing  to  attend 
either  celebration.  Mayor  Rolph  solved  the  prob- 
lem in  much  the  same  way,  except  that  instead 
of  refusing  to  attend  he  was  "unable"  to  at- 
tend. The  differences  in  the  colony  have  been 
aired  for  some  time  in  the  two  hostile  Frencn 
newspapers,  but  it  would  take  an  expert  to  state 
them  clearly.  It  is  not  so  long  ago  that  the 
Irish  societies  had  a  similar  fracas  over  the 
celebration  of  St.  Patrick's  Daj . 


He  Answered  McCombs 

The  selection  of  William  F.  McCombs  of  New 
York  to  head  the  committee  which  will  handle 
Woodrow  Wilson's  Presidential  campaign  will 
naturally  bring  out  a  lot  of  information  about 
this  comparatively  unknown  young  iawyer.  Let 
me  get  in  on  the  ground  floor  with  a  story  When 
Judge  Parker  was  running  for  President  Mc- 
Combs was  a  candidate  for  the  New  York  As- 
sembly, and  was  beaten.  One  night  he  was  ad- 
dressing an  open-air  meeting  on  the  subject  of 
the  tariflf.  He  recounted  the  varioiis  necessaries 
of  life  upon  which  the  consumer  is  compelled 
to  pay  a  tax,  and  then  paused  dramatically.  "What, 
my  friends,  is  there  left?  What  is  there  upon 
which  the  American  workingman  does  not  have 
to  pay  a  premium  for  the  support  of  special 
privilege?"  McCombs  didn't  expect  an  answer, 
but  he  got  one.  From  a  disgruntled  auditor  came 
the  response:  "Hot  air  and  kids!"  And  Mc- 
Combs ceased  orating. 

Italian-Swiss  Colony  TIPO  (red  or  white)  has 
a  larger  sale  than  any  other  American  wine.  You 
will  know  the  reason  why  when  you  drink  it. 


Tel«phon«  Kearny  1 1 


Armor  Plate  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

OF  UNION  SAFE  DEPOSIT  COMPANY  IN  BUILDING  OF 

Union  Trust  Company 
=  of  San  Francisco  = 

JUNCTION  OF 

MARKET  and  O'FARRELL  STS. 
and  GRANT  AVE. 

Largest,  Strongest  and  Most  Conveniently 
Arranged  Safe  Deposit  West  of  New  York 

BOXES  $4.00  PER  ANNUM  AND  UPWARDS 


HUNTER 
WHISKEY 


HAS  GAINED  PUBLIC  FAVOR 
BECAUSE  IT  IS  A  PERFECTLY 
PURE    RYE   WHISKEY,  RICH, 
RARE  AND  MELLOW 


Sold  at  all  first-class  cafes  and  by  jobbers 
WM.  LANAHAN  &  SON,  Baltimore,  Md. 


HOTEL  ARGONAUT 

Society  of  California  Pioneers  Building 
FOURTH  STREET  NEAR  MARKET 

California's  Most  Popular  Hotel 

400  Rooms,  200  Baths;  European  Plan;  $1.00  per  Day 
and  up.  Dining  Room  Seating  500.  Table  d'hote  or  a 
la  carte  service  as  desired. 

Special  Sunday  Dinner,  including  Wine,  $1.00 

Edward  Rolkin,  Mgr.  Geo.  A.  Dixon,  Asst.  Mgr. 


Santa  Cruz 

"The  Atlantic  City  of  the  Pacific  Coast" 

IS  PLANNING  A 

Wonderful  Water 
Pageant 

For  the  Following  Dates: 

July  20th  to  July  28th 

(Inclusive) 

Yacht  Regattas — Motor  Boat  Races — Review  of 
American  Battleships — Parade  of  Decorated 
Water  Floats — Swimming  and  Rowing  Con- 
tests— Surf-bathing  —  Dancing — Golf  —  Tennis 
— Fire-works. 

DONT  MISS  THE  FUN 

Regular  Rates  at  New  Hotel  Casa  del  Rey 
Special  Low  Ticket  Farea 
Ask  Our  Agents 

Southern  Pacific 

Flood   Building  Palace  Hotel 

Third  and  Townsend  Street  Station 
Market  Street  Ferry  Station 
SAN  FRANCISCO 
Broadway  and  Thirteenth  Street 
OAKLAND 


12 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


Satire  From  Alameda 

Iking  only  an  editor  1  am  permitted  to  lose 
my  tranquility  of  temper,  if  not  when  I  fail  to 
get  applause  commensurate  with  my  merit,  at 
least  when  I  see  a  smartaleck  indulging  his  pro- 
pensity to  ridiculous  display.  If  I  have  one 
weakness  it  is  that  I  permit  the  smartaleck  to 
be  my  pet  aversion.  Now  I  have  flattered  my- 
self that  of  this  breed  there  is  not  one  among 
all  the  fortunate  readers  of  Town  Talk.  In  my 
pride  I  have  said,  "There  is  never  anything  in 
this  paper  to  attract  the  attention  of  a  smart- 
aleck. It  is  just  the  sort  of  paper  that  no  smart- 
aleck would  ever  care  to  read."  Fancy  my  chagrin 
then  to  receive  this  letter: 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Dear  Sir.  I  have  always 
been  of  the  opinion  that  the  Spectator  did  not 
know  whereof  he  wrote  and  I  am  strength- 
ened in  this  on  reading  that  the  name  of  the 
President  of  Columbia  University  is  William 
Murray  Butler.  When  did  he  change  his 
name  from  Nicholas  Murray  Butler?  Or  is 
Nicholas  his  standpat  name  and  William  his 
progressive  name?  Would  the  Spectator 
kindly  take  a  week  or  two  off  and  look  this 
matter  up  for  me.  I  would  be  very  thankful 
to  him  if  he  would  put  me  right  in  the  matter. 

Very  truly  yours, 

— Walter  R.  Graham. 
Mr.  Graham  vindicates  his  confidence  in  him- 
self not  only  by  signing  his  name  but  also  by 
giving  his  address  which  is  552  Santa  Clara  ave- 
nue, Alameda. 


Philosophic  Scrutiny 

Mr.  Graham  has  the  brand  of  the  smartaleck 
blown  in  the  bottle.  You  can  tell  him  because 
unconsciously  he  has  written  himself  down  what 
he  is.  Being  something  of  a  philosopher,  for  the 
edification  of  my  readers  I  will  examine  him  as 
a  scientist  would  a  beetle.    I  will  not  admonish 


Gingerbread 

Well-made  Gingerbread,  never  soggy,  but  \» 
fluffy  and  light,  delights  the  children  and  is 
pleasing  to  grown-ups.  To  make  it  creamy, 
fluffy  and  light,  use 

BORDEN'S  EAGLE  BRAND 
CONDENSED  MILK 

RECIPE— Heat  one-half  pound  ImtUr  and  six  ounces  of 
sugar  to  a  cream,  add  six  well-bealeii  rges  and  l>eat  thor- 
oughly. Dissolve  one  teaspoontnl  8"da  in  a  little  hot 
water,  add  it  t'»  two  cups  molasses;  ndx  and  slir  into  the 
first  miiture;  then  add  .six  tabiespoonfuls  Kagle  Hrand 
Condensed  Blilk  diluted  with  one 
anil  tliree-fonrths  cnps  wat«r,  and 
one  (mart  ami  a  pint  of  flour.  Beat 
sifiooth.  add  two  heaplni;  tahle- 
nifnls  of  ginuer.  mix,  pour 
well -greased  shallow  nans 
il  bake  in  a  moderate  oven  about 
lurty  minutes. 

Write  for  Borden 's  Redpe  Book  = 
0 


him,  knowing  that  admonition  would  fall  on  his 
head  like  the  tap  of  a  woodpecker  on  a  steel 
rail.  Observe,  my  beloved  disciples,  the  smirk  of 
conceit  in  the  face  of  our  smartaleck  as  he  gazes 
at  me  while  I  stand  before  him  convicted  in  his 
opinion  ot  having  perpetrated  a  gross  blunder  in 
what  ought  to  be  a  common  heritage  of  knowl- 
edge. "I  have  always  been  of  the  opinion"'  he 
solemnly  observes,  "that  the  Spectator  did  not 
know  whereof  he  wrote,  and  I  am  strengthened 
in  this  on  reading,"  etc.  Observe  how  my  cor- 
respondent felicitates  himself  on  having  made  the 
discovery  of  prodigious  importance  that  I  ap- 
peared to  be  unfamiliar  with  the  Christian  name 
of  President  Butler.  Mr.  Graham  himself,  know- 
ing President  Butler's  true  name,  and  being 
swollen  with  the  pride  of  his  wonderful  knowledge, 
hastens  to  grin  at  me  through  a  horse-collar.  The 
smartaleckncss  of  my  correspondent  is  evidenced 
by  this, — that  he  has  always  suspected  me  of 
being  ignorant  of  what  I  wrote  and,  presumably, 
has  been  lying  in  wait  to  trip  me  by  the  heels 
without  getting  the  opportunity  till  I  wrote 
"William"  instead  of  "Nicholas."  Thui  his  un- 
conscious confession.  The  average  reader  of 
Town  Talk  knows  that  my  blunders  are  not  at 
all  like  angels'  visits.  Almost  anybody  but  a 
smartaleck  would  be  able  to  catch  me  in  one 
every  week.  I  have  discovered  a  few  myself  and 
gasped  at  them.  He  has  missed  a  very  poignant 
sensation  who  has  not  blushed  in  secret  over 
some  very  hideous  lapse  and  felt  like  hiding  his 
diminished  head  from  the  accusing  light  of  day. 
But  to  return  to  Mr.  Graham  of  Santa  Clara 
avenue.  I  have  given  him  much  space  by  way  of 
warning  not  to  himself  but  to  others  whom  I 
would  admonish  to  renounce  the  ways  of  the 
village  cut-up  ere  Death  snatches  them  to  the 
lowest  ring  of  Dante's  inferno.  It  is  men  with 
intellects  of  the  smartaleck  order  who  rock  the 
boat,  strike  at  objects  in  their  path  with  the  butt 
end  of  a  loaded  gun  and  most  enthusiastically 
devote  themselves  to  the  service  of  mankind  iu 
general  and  T.   R.   in  particular. 


"Interpretations" 

To  one  wearied  of  the  intellectual  reflections 
and  subtle  abstractions  of  poets  mystical  and 
jjoets  with  philosophic  messages,  poets  with 
blinding  doubts  and  pallid  passions,  it  is  most 
agreeable  and  refreshing  to  come  across  a  book 
of  verse  that  appeals  to  the  general  heart.  Es- 
pecially is  it  agreeable  and  refreshing  when  the 
poet  is  a  young  woman  who  knows  something 
of  the  significance  of  life,  of  the  quality  of  ele- 
mental love  and  of  the  joys  and  sorrows  that 
are  the  perdurable  stuff  of  existence.  Such  a 
woman,  I  fancy,  is  Zoe  Akins,  whose  first  book 
of. poems,  "Interpretations,"  has  been  brought 
out  by  Mitchell  Kennerley,  a  publisher  who  is 
bringing  out  many  good  things  these  days.  As 
these  poems  of  Zoe  Akins  pique  curiosity  it  is 
interesting  to  learn  that  she  is  not  far  away. 
Whatever  it  is  in  California  that  appeals  to  tlic 
literary  mind  the  author  of  "Interpretations"'  has 
felt,  and  she  is  now  one  of  us,  living,  alas,  not  in 
Carmel,  but  in  San  Diego.  Miss  Akins  is  a 
fine  lyric  poet  in  the  sense  that  her  poems  re- 
flect her  emotions  and  impressions.  She  is  also 
a  verj'  captivating  poet  because  she  writes  witli 


The 


Ciga^rette 
Quality 

AR.ONATIC  OELICACT 
MILDNESS 
PURITY 


At  your  Club  or  Dealer's  or 
THE  SURBRUa  CO.,  Make™,  New  York 


an  engaging  clearness  and  convinces  you  that 
there  is  a  very  sweet  woman's  heart  beating 
in  unison  with  her  numbers.  Perhaps  the  most 
ambitious  of  her  poems  is  one  in  which  she 
appears  as  the  imaginative  cxegetist  of  Mary 
Magdalen.  This  is  the  poem  or  a  aramatic 
thinker  in  which  she  gives  expression  to  her 
ideas  in  the  fetters  of  monologue  and  with  con- 
siderable force  and  beauty.  She  pictures  the 
Magdalen  as  a  woman  with  a  craving  for  im- 
mortality, eager  to  live  "as  long  in  legend  as  the 
Spartan  queen,"  scorned  by  the  world  but  "too 
imperial  for  scorn  to  touch,"  a  courtesan  whose 
lovers  were  nothing  more  than  her  friends  or 
slaves,  a  wanton  who  "lived  in  ultimate  virginity." 
To  quote  is  tempting,  but  to  do  justice  by  mere 
fragments  is  impossible.  The  poem  is  full  of 
dramatic  fervor  blended  with  sweet  melancholy 
and   religious  rapture. 


The  Tragedy  of  Woman 

Far  be  it  from  me  to  suggest  that  there  ii  any- 
thing of  misanthropia  in  Miss  Akins'  poetry. 
Something  there  is,  however,  of  a  melancholy  dis- 
position. Indeed  it  is  the  keynote  of  her  finest 
poems,  melodious  outpourings  of  a  soul  leaning 
passionately  backwards  to  the  ecstasies  of  a  past 
vibrant  with  ardent  sentiment.  But  there  is  one 
poem  in  which  I  find  something  of  protest  against 
the  lot  of  woman.  Herein  she  takes  for  her  text, 
as  it  were,  the  observation  of  Balzac  "The  life  of 
every  woman  is  one  of  three  tragedies — celibacy, 
marriage  or  unchastity."  By  means  of  the 
monologue  she  expresses  revolt  against  each  of 


MURPHY,  GRANT  &  CO. 

WHOLESALE  DRY  GOODS 

FURNISHING  GOODS.  NOTIONS, 
WHITE  GOODS,  LACES. 

Northeast  corner  BUSH  and  SANSOME  STS. 

SAN  FRANCISCO 


Thru  Railroad  Tickets 


Issued  to  All  Parts  of 


PORTLAND 

Sails  12  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $10,  $12,  $15.    2d  class  $6.00. 

The  San  Francisco  and  Portland  S.  S.  Co. 

A.  OTTIXGER,  General  Agent. 


United  States,  Canada  and  Mexico 

In   connection   with  These   Magnificent   Passenger  Steamers 

LOS  ANGELES 

Sails   11  a.  m.  every  filth  day.    1st  class  $8.35.      2d  class  $5.35. 

Ticket  Office,  722  Market.    Phone  Sutter  2344 

8    East    Street,    opp.    Ferry    Building.    Phone    Sutter  2482 

lierkeley    Office,    2105    Shattuck.       Phone     Berkeley  331 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


13 


tlie  three,  grouping  them  all  as  tragedy.  The 
niDiiologue  of  the  wife  will  probably  meet  with 
warm  approval  in  club  circles: 

For  at  the  altar  was  my  freedom  slain, 

My  dreams  have  all  been  shattered  past  retrieve, 

And  servitude  has  dulled  and  broken  me    .    .  . 

I  am  a  cloud  that  sends  a  little  rain 

To  bring  forth  harvest  I  shall  never  see. 

It  is  hard  to  say  which  of  the  three  women 
finds  her  lot  the  most  tragic. 


A  Sonnet 

Zoe  Akins  is  not  a  poet  of  a  single  mood,  but 
her  melancholy  is  the  dominant  note  of  her  tem- 
perament. Her  verses  abound  in  heart-cries  of 
a  melodious  tenderness  that  moves,  and  they  are 
vivid  with  the  circumstances  of  real  existence. 
Though  she  has  great  admiration  for  Swinburne, 
as  I  learn  fiom  one  of  her  poems,  unlike  him 
she  is  not  interested  in  words  and  phrases,  but 
rather  in  the  great  truths  of  life  and  emotion. 
There  is  one  splendid  excellence  which  her 
poetry  has — the  excellence  of  sincerity,  courage 
and  clarity.  She  has  thought  to  express,  and  she 
does  not  weight  it  down  with  wordy  decoration 
or  besmear  it  with  verbal  color.  Here  is  a  son- 
net the  subject  of  which  has  induced  mawkish- 
ncss  in  many  a  poet,  but  which  Zoe  Akins  handles 
with  sympathy  and  with  dignity: 

Since  I  liad  heard  them  speak  of  her  great  shame 
I  looked  upoti  her  face  with  curious  eyes. 
But  pity  in  my  heart  became  surprise, — 

Finding  not  any  havoc  there,  nor  flame; 

Only  a  little  smile  that  went  and  came, 
As  if  she  knew  a  mirth  too  great  and  wise 
And  far  too  proud  to  serve  the  world  with  lies, 

Disdaining  as  she  did  its  praise  or  blame. 

She  who  had  passed  through  sin,  as  through  a  door. 
Stayed  not  upon  the  steps  to  wail  and  beat 

Against  the  portal  closed  for  evermore: 

But  smiled  and  went  her  way  with  tireless  feet. 

When  night  had  passed  and  the  long  day  begun; — 
So  Hagar  faced  the  desert  with  her  son. 


Mary  Is  a  Genius 

Mary  Austin  is  a  genius.  I  don't  have  to  prove 
it  because  she  admits  it.  The  interesting  admis- 
sion will  be  found  in  the  preface  of  her  new 
book,  "A  Woman  of  Genius"  which  is  soon  com- 
ing out  and  which,  Mary  modestly  admits,  is 
largely  autobiographical.  "The  book  is  auto- 
biographical in  essence,"  says  Mary,  and  of 
course   the   title  describes   herself.    She  is  the 


woman  of  genius.  The  dictionary  defines  a 
genius  as  "a  person  of  phenomenal  faculties,  or 
extraordinary  and  original  powers  for  intellectual 
invention,  construction,  interpretation  or  ex- 
pression." That  Mary  has  proved  her  right  to 
be  considered  such  a  person  by  reason  of  writing 
"The  Land  of  Little  Rain,"  "The  Arrow  Maker" 
and  other  books  and  plays,  Mary  is  quite  willing 
to  affirm.  But  she  takes  her  position  as  a  genius 
rather  sorrowfully  than  with  exultation.  Thus,  in 
her  preface  to  the  new  book  which  is  auto- 
biographical she  says:  "If  I  know  anything  of 
genius  (and  of  course  Mary  must  because  she 
is  one)  it  is  wholly  extraneous,  derived,  imper- 
sonal, flowing  through  and  by.  I  cannot  tell  you 
what  it  is,  but  I  hope  to  show  you  a  little  of  how 
I  was  seized  of  it,  shaped;  what  resistances  op- 
posed to  it,  what  surrenders.  I  mean  to  put  as 
plainly  as  possible  how  I  felt  it  fumbling  at  my 
earlier  life  like  the  sea  at  the  foot  of  the  tidal 
wall,  and  by  what  rifts  in  the  structure  of  living 
its  inundation  rose  upon  me;  by  what  practices 
and  passions  I  was  enlarged  to  it,  and  by  what 
well  meaning  to  my  friends  I  was  cramped  and 
hardened.  But  of  its  ultimate  operation,  once 
it  had  worked  up  through  my  stiff  clay,  of 
triumphs,  profits,  all  the  intricacies  of  technique, 
gossip  of  rehearsals,  you  shall  hear  next  to 
nothing." 


No  Credit  to  Herself 

But  Mary  takes  no  credit  to  herself  for  being 
a  genius.  Slie  just  couldn't  help  it.  It  wasn't 
her  fault  or  her  merit,  as  you  please.  Listen  fur- 
ther: "What  I  mean  to  go  about  is  the  exploita- 
tion of  the  personal  phases  of  genius,  of  which 
when  it  refers  to  myself  you  must  not  under- 
stand me  to  speak  of  it  as  a  peculiar  merit,  like 
the  faculty  of  presiding  at  a  woman's  club  or 
baking  sixteen  pies  of  a  morning;  rather  as  a 
seizure,  a  possession  which  overtook  me  un- 
awares, like  on  of  those  insidious  Oriental  dis- 
orders which  you  may  never  die  of,  but  which 
can  never  be  cured.  You  shall  hear  how  I  did 
stave  it  off  in  my  youth  for  the  sake  of  a  work- 
ing tailor  and  men's  outfitter,  and  was  nearly  in- 
timidated out  of  it.  by  the  wife  of  a  Chicago  at- 
torney who  had  something  to  do  with  stocks; 
how  I  was  often  very  tired  of  it  and  many  times, 
especially  in  the  earlier  periods,  I  should  hs\ve 
been  happiest  to  have  been  quit  of  it  altogether." 
So  you  see,  being  a  genius  is  no  small  job,  no 

A  Treat  in  the  Country.    Especially  if  it  is  a 

box  of   Geo.  Haas   &  Sons'   delicious  candies. 

Sent  by  mail  or  express  from  any  of  their  four 
stores. 


George  R.  Shreve 

Having  severed  his  connection  with 
Shreve  and  Co.  announces  that  he  is  now 
associated  with 

TREAT  &  EACRET 

Jewelers  and  Silversmiths 

136  GEARY  STREET 


primrose  occupation.  Poor  Mary!  fate  decreed 
that  she  should  be  a  genius,  and'  she's  not  quite 
reconciled  to  the  decree.  No  doubt  she  would  be 
much  happier  if  fate  had  allowed  her  to  be 
a  housewife  baking  sixteen  pies  of  a  morning! 


To  Give  Up  the  Desert 

Friends  of  Mary  Austin,  by  the  way,  will 
regret  to  learn  that  she  was  overcome  by  the 
terrific  heat  in  New  York  a  few  days  ago.  Her 
prostration  occurred  in  the  street.  She  was 
hurried  to  the  National  Art  Club  nearby,  and 
afterwards  taken  home.  Her  condition  was  not 
serious.  Mrs.  Austin  is  not  going  to  miss  the 
opportunity  to  vote  this  fall  any  more  than  Mrs. 
Atherton  is.  She  will  come  home  soon,  and  take 
up  her  residence  at  Carmel  among  the  lights  of 
literature.  No  more  books  about  the  desert  will 
come  from  Mary  Austin's  pen.  "I  shall  never 
write  another  book  about  the  desert  or  about 
primitive  life  in  the  Far  West,"  she  says.  "The 
desert  was  generous  to  me  with  its  material,  but 
I  feel  that  I  have  gone  as  far  with  it  as  I  care 
to.  But  others  will  find  plenty  of  material  m 
the  desert  for  years  to  come,  for  the  fascination 
of  the  life  is  great." 


That  Desert  Fascination 

What  Mary  Austin  says  about  the  fascination 
of  the  desert  cannot  be  gainsaid.  I  wonder  if  the 
desert  places  exercise  their  lure  chiefly  on 
women?  Mary  Austin  is  not  the  only  Californian 
woman  who  has  surrendered  to  that  call  of  the 
arid  places,  but  she  was  one  of  the  first.  When 
very  young  she  went  with  her  family  and  took 
up  a  homestead  claim  on  the  edge  of  the  desert 
slope  of  the  Sierras.  She  was  married  there  and 
went  with  her  husband  who  was  a  Registrar  of 
the  United  States  Land  Office,  further  into  the 
desert  to  a  mining  country  about  a  day's  journey 
north  of  Death  Valley.  She  was  the  only  white 
woman  within  thirty  miles.  Another  Californian 
who  had  this  experience  was  Gertrude  Boyle,  the 
sculptor,  now  Mrs.  Kanno.  She  spent  a  long 
time  alone  on  the  Arizona  wastes.  And  more 
recently  the  lure  of  the  Sahara  was  so  strong  for 
Mrs.  Hugo  Mansfeldt  that  she  made  two  trips 
into  the  Garden  of  Allah. 


"I  understand  bathing  suits  arc  higher  this 
year,"  remarked  the  summer  girl. 

"Yes,"  replied  the  callow  salesman,  blushing 
slightly.  "I  believe  they  have  gone  up  several 
inches." 


ARTIFICIAL  TEETH  t£.''d: 

Dr.  C.  E.  WILSON 
323  Geary  St.     Suite  604     San  Francisco 


HAMMOCKS 

We  have  an  overstock  and  will  sacrifice  these 
Hammocks  at  a  very  low  price.  We  are  making  a 
specialty  of  Blue  and  White  Canvas  Striped  Ham- 
mocks at  $1.25  each. 

WEEKS- HOWE- EMERSON  COMPANY 

51  Market  Street      San  Francisco 


739  Market  Street,  Opp.  Grant  Avenue 
1615  Fillmore  Street,  Near  Geary 
Phone«:         West  7831         Home  J  1223        S  3757 
San  Franciaco 


14 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


DE  WOLF  HOPPER 

Ihc  (iistiiigiiishcd  singer-comedian,  who  will  be  seen  in  "The  Mikado"  at  the  Cort  Sunday  night. 


Across  the  Bay 

There  is  a  steady  drift  of  home  buyers  from 
all  sections  to  Berkeley.  In  the  Cragmont  dis- 
trict alone  which  is  handled  by  Harold  Havens 
&  Co.  one  thousand  lots  have  been  sold  of  late, 
the  average  price  being  $1,200.  Several  new 
homes  are  now  in  course  of  construction  in  this 
district,  and  there  are  fewer  houses  vacant  this 
season  than  ever  before.  There  is  also  a  steady 
demand  for  home  sites  in  the  Northbrae  prop- 
erties comprised  in  one  of  the  most  beautiful 
tracts  across  the  bay,  which  has  been  artisically 
embellished  by  Mason,  McDuffie  &  Co.  A  fran- 
chise has  been  granted  to  the  Euclid  Avenue  Rail- 
road to  extend  its  system  to  the  center  of  this 
tract.  When  this  road  is  built  the  section  will 
have  unsurpassed  transportation  facilities — local 
connections  with  four  depots,  two  of  the  Key 
Route  and  two  of  the  Southern  Pacific.  Build- 
ing operations  are  active  in  this  tract.  Among 
the  other  attractive  Berkeley  tracts  is  Kensing- 
ton Park  up  among  the  Berkeley  hills.  Homes  in 
this  park  are  subject  to  restrictions.  Running 
through  it  are  beautiful  boulevards  and  there  are 
monumental  entrance  three  hundred  and  fifty  feet 
in  width.  The  indications  are  that  Rockridge  will 
soon  have  the  most  cultured  colony  across  the 
bay.  It  is  attracting  artistic  folks  and  people  of 
wealth  and  taste.  One  resident  has  embellished 
his  home  at  a  cost  of  $125,000. 


A  SKIN  OF  BEAUTY  IS  A  JOY  FOREVER 

DR.  T.  FELIX  GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL  CREAM 

OR  MAGICAL  BEAUTIFIER 

Removes  Tan,  Pimples, 
Freckles,  Moth  Patches, 
Rash  and  Skin  Diseases, 
and  every  bcmish  on  beauty, 
and  defies  detection.  It  has 
stood  the  test  for  62  years ; 
no  other  has,  and  it  is  so 
harmless  we  taste  it  to  be 
sure  it  is  properly  made. 
The  distinguished  Dr.  L.  A. 
Sayre  said  to  a  lady  of  the 
haut-ton  (a  patient) :  "As 
you  ladies  will  use  them. 
I  recommend  'Gouraud's  Cream'  as  the  last  harmful  of 
all  the  skin  preparations. 

For  Sale  by  all  Druggists  and  Fancy  Good  Dealers 
GOURAUD  S   ORIENTAL  TOILET  POWDER 
For  infants  and  adults.    Exquisitely  perfumed.  Relieves 
Skin  Irritation,  cures  Sunburn  and  renders  an  excellent 
complexion.    Price  25  Cents,  by  Mail. 

GOURAUD'S  POUDRE  SUBTILE 
Removes  Superfluous  Hair.  Price  $1.00,  by  Mail 

FERD.  T.  HOPKINS.  Pr.».,  37  Grot  Itmm  St..  Km,  1-k  Citw 


Since  the  decision  rendered  by  the  United  States  Supreme 
Court,  it  has  been  decided  by  the  Monks  hereafter  to  bottle 

CHARTREUSE 

(Liqueur  Peres  Chartreux) 

both  being  identically  the  same  article,  under  a  combination 
label  representing  the  old  and  the  new  labels,  and  in  the  old 
style  of  bottle  bearing  the  Monks'  familiar  insignia,  as  shown 
in  this  advertisement. 

According  to  the  decision  of  thf  U.  S.  Supreme  Court, 
handed  down  by  Mr.  Justice  Hughes  on  May  29,  1911,  no 
one  but  the  Carthusian  Monks  (Peres  Chartreux)  is  entitled 
to  use  the  word  CHARTREUSE  as  the  name  or  designation 
of  a  Liqueur,  so  their  victory  in  the  suit  against  the  Cusenier 
Company,  representing  M.  Henri  Lecouturier,  the  Liquidator 
appointed  by  the  French  Courts,  and  his  successors,  the 
Compagnie  Fermiere  de  la  Grande  Chartreuse,  is  complete. 

The  Carthusian  Monks  (Peres  Chartreux),  and  they  alone, 
have  the  formula  or  recipe  of  the  secret  process  employed 
in  the  manufacture  of  the  genuine  Chartreuse,  and  have  never 
parted  with  it.  There  is  no  genuine  Chartreuse  save  that 
made  by  them  at  Tarragona,  Spain. 

At  first-class  Wine  Merchants,  Grocers,  Hotels,  Caiea. 
Batjer  &  Co.,  45  Broadway,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Sole  Agents  for  United  States. 


FOR  ECONOMY  AND 
CLEANLINESS 

WELSH 

ANTHRACITE 

BRIQUETTES 

Suitable  for  Furnace  and  Grates 

Price  $13.00  Per  Ton  Delivered 
to  Your  Residence 

Anthracite  Coal  Corporation 

TELEPHONE  1742 

July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


Social  Prattle 


By  TANTALUS 


Jennie  Crocker,  Adieu! 

"Siie  married  and  rode  away."  Yes,  she  mar- 
ried in  millionaire  splendor  and  rode  away  in  her 
private  car,  "Mishawaka."  And  so,  we  shall  have 
no  more  occasion  to  speak  of  Jennie  Crocker  of 
Hillsborough.  Henceforth  it  must  be  Mrs.  Mal- 
colm Whitman  of  Fifth  avenue.  New  York.  We 
are  all  sorry  to  see  her  go;  for  we  all  had  reason 
to  be  proud  of  her.  Our  richest  daughter,  she 
was  at  the  same  time  one  of  our  sweetest,  our 
most  attractive,  our  most  unafifected  and  our  most 
loyal  girls.  The  difficulties  of  her  gilded  position 
she  solved  easily,  for  she  was  modest,  well 
behaved.  She  always  showed  a  dislike  for 
vulgar  display  and  ostentation.  Her  wealth 
was  not  a  curse  but  a  blessing.  She  used 
it  to  make  other  people  happy.  She  was  a  true, 
a  steadfast  friend;  she  loved  little  children.  She 
had  a  healthy  delight  in  God's  great  Out-of- 
Doors.  She  was  athletic,  in  moderation,  as  be- 
came a  girl  who  valued  her  feminine  qualities  and 
abhorred  aping  rough  masculinity.  No  blue- 
stocking, she  was  known  for  her  honest  apprecia- 
tion of  good  things  in  art,  literature,  music  and 
the  drama.  She  was,  withal,  an  example  to  girls 
not  so  bountifully  favored  by  fortunte.  She  was 
never  impressed  with  her  own  importance,  know- 
ing that  the  inheritance  of  money  is  one  of  this 
world's  accidents,  arguing  no  special  merit  in  the 
heir.  She  has  left  us,  following  her  husband  to 
his  home,  and  there  is  none  to  take  her  place. 
A  dainty  personality  has  been  withdrawn  from  our 
midst.  Its  fragrance  remains,  but  that  too  must 
inevitably  disappear.  And  so  we  say,  in  all  sin- 
cerity, "Jennie  Crocker,  adieu!  and  God  bless 
you !" 


The  Note  of  Simplicity 

After  regaling  us  for  weeks  with  details  of  the 
approaching  wedding  that  fairly  bristled  wifh  dol- 
lars and  corruscated  with  precious  stones,  the 
bavardes  accentuated  the  note  of  simplicity  in 
their  accounts  of  the  marriage  ceremony  and  the 
subsequent  festivities.  Simplicity  was  the  kcy- 
;.ote  of  the  church  decorations,  we  learn.  It 
showed  itself  in  the  profusely  scattered  white 
Japanese  hydrangea  before  the  chancel,  the  gilt 
vases  filled  with  pink  tiger  lilies  on  the  altar, 
the  garlands  of  ferns  that  hid  the  beamed  ceil- 
ing, the  bay  trees  along  the  sides  with  hundreds 
of  white  gardenia  flowers  tied  to  them  which  sug- 
gested "a  summery,  e.xotic  garden,"  the  pink  and 
white  hydrangea  that  hedged  the  centre  aisle  and 
the  armsful  of  the  same  flower  which  were  tied 
to  each  pew  with  bows  of  white  tulle.  The  same 
note  of  simplicity  was  evident,  we  learn,  in  the 
dresses  of  the  wedding  party  and  the  feminine 
guests,  ninety  per  cent  of  which  dresses  were 
specially  imported  from  Paris  for  the  ceremony. 
The  note  of  simplicity  was  struck  again  by  the 
pavilion  which  George  Howard  designed  for  the 
wedding  breakfast.  This  pavilion  was  so  sim- 
ple that  it  reminded  one  bavarde  of  "one  of  those 


LUCERNE  APARTMENTS 

766  SUTTER  STREET,  near  Jones 

JUST  OPENED 

Elegant  sunny  2,   3,  4  and   5-room   apartments  with 
complete  service.    Furnished  or  unfurnished. 

Telephone  Franklin  7866 


higlily  impressionistic  arched  palaces  put  on  can- 
vas by  Paolo  Veronese,  the  Venetian  painter." 
Reading  that  gem,  I  turned  to  the  other  papers, 
confident  that  another  bavarde  would  be  reminded 
of  "the  stately  pleasure  dome"  which  Kubla  Khan 
decreed  "where  Alph,  the  sacred  river,  ran."  but 
was  disappointed.  Yes,  simplicity  was  undoubt- 
edly  the  keynote  of  the   whole  gorgous  affair. 


I'liuto,  Kathryn  Hopkins 


MISS    CAMILLE  DORN 
The  attractive  eldest  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  D.  S. 
Dorn  who  is  spending  the  summer  with  her  family 
at   Lake  Tahoe. 

L!ut  it  was  a  simplicity  of  superlative  complex- 
ity, the  most  elaborate,  the  most  splendiferous, 
the  most  munificent  and  the  most  magnificent 
simplicity  ever  displayed  in  these  parts. 


A  Belasco  Wedding 

As  a  matter  of  fact,  the  wedding  had  all  the 
simplicity  which  David  Belasco  would  give  it  if 
he  presented  it  as  a  scene  in  one  of  his  melo- 
dramas. Hordes  of  beggars  were  at  the  church 
to  supply  the  note  of  contrast  so  necessary  in 
all  dramatic  portrayals.  Intrusive  lunatics  were 
hustled  away  by  the  police.  Constables  on  horse- 
back and  detectives  in  plain  clothes  from  this  city 
guarded  the  presents  against  porch-climbers  and 
thieves.  A  mob  of  women  stormed  the  church 
and  attacked  the  bride,  tearing  her  veil  to 
pieces  and  despoiling  her  of  her  orange  blossoms. 
The  men  of  the  wedding  party  bunched  in  foot- 
ball formation  to  clear  a  way  to  the  motor  cars 
when  the  ceremony  was  over.  And  when  the 
bride  was  boarding  her  special  car,  the  groom 
guarded  her  luggage  with  a  drawn  revolver. 
That  was  the  final  Belasco  touch.  A  drawn  re- 
volver in  the  hand  of  a  groom  at  a  wedding  in 
a  San  Francisco  suburb!  And  this  in  the  year 
of  grace  1912!  'Twas  a  note  that  would  have  ac- 
corded with  the  armed  simplicity  of  the  red  shirt 
days  of  forty-nine,  but  surely  it  was  out  of  tone 
with  twentieth  century  simplicity. 


fountain,  all  reflect  the  personality  of  the  bride." 
I  should  like  to  know  how  church  decorations,  a 
pavilion  and  a  garden  can  reflect  anybody's  per- 
sonality. The  fountain  might  reflect  Miss 
Crocker's  face  if  she  took  the  trouble  to  bend 
over  it,  Narcissus-like,  when  the  water  was  still. 
But  how  her  personality?  Then  again,  I  am 
troubled  about  the  architecture  of  that  pavilion.' 
One  bavarde  said  it  suggested  a  Durbar  edifice, 
so  it  must  have  been  oriental  in  architecture. 
Another  found  it  "impressionistic,"  whatever  that 
means.  This  bavarde  further  complicates  mat- 
ters by  combining  impressionism  with  a  refer- 
ence to  Paolo  Veronese  who  was  everything  the 
impressionists  were  not.  Still  another  suggests 
that  it  was  classic  in  design.  I  give  it  up.  Will 
Architect  George  Howard  please  set  them  all 
right?  Another  mystery — best  man  Harold  Fitz- 
gerald was  described  as  "a  member  of  an  old 
Knickerbocker  family  of  New  York."  Now,  how 
in  the  name  of  that  interesting  branch  of 
philology  which  deals  with  patronymics,  can  a 
Fitzgerald  be  a  Knickerbocker?  Did  some 
branch  of  the  royal  Irish  house  of  the  Fitzgeralds 
settle  in  Holland  and  go  thence  with  other  Dutch 
settlers  to  New  York? 


Threats  of  Injury 

When  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Malcolm  Whitman  drove 
away  from  their  wedding  in  a  shower  of  rice  and 
flowers  the  guests  noticed  a  second  automobile 
that  rounded  the  house  and  followed  in  the  wake 
of  the  limousine  that  held  the  bride  and  groom. 
Many  supposed  it  was  for  the  young  couple  to 
finish  the  drive  to  the  station  after  leaving  the 
grounds  in  the  gayly  decorated  car  that  dragged 
a  dainty  white  slipper  behind  it.  But  the  ini- 
tiated knew  it  carried  plain  clothes  men  to  guard 
the  person  of  the  bride  who  had  been  threatened 
in  letters  from  cranks  in  the  past  weeks.  At 
the  station  the  detectives  took  up  their  stand  be- 
fore bride  and  groom  alighted  and  as  they  made 
their  way  to  the  private  train  awaiting  them 
young  Whitman  held  his  revolver  in  plain 
view  of  any  possible  assailant.  To  the  solic- 
itude of  Whitman  and  Henry  T.  Scott  were  due 
these  precautions.  Mrs.  Whitman  herself  scouted 
thoughts  of  fear  for  her  safety  although  she  ar- 
ranged to  have  the  wedding  gifts  well  guarded. 
It  is  generally  agreed  that  not  excepting  Helene 
Irwin  when  she  married  Templeton  Crocker  no 
California  bride  has  received  anything  like  the 


Crocker-Whitman  Bavardage 

There  were  some  things  in  the  accounts  of  the 
wedding  which  it  is  rather  difficult  to  understand. 
For  instance:  "The  decorations  in  the  church,  the 
tented  pavilion,  the  almost  magical  garden  and 


tJout  man  Ao/Coir  oX.  man  in- 
te^i^e^uM  ani  SXa  app£ujpu^  h. 
ia  pt/paxotion  <lu  poA^tm 
3)j«'i-0{Iaa,  inic/tp/tct<xttan  par- 

TRANSLATION:  "All  my  knowledge  and  Ikill 
have  been  applied  to  miking  Djer-Kiss  perfume 
the  perfect  inlerprelation  of  feminine  fancy." 

&xtxaci/   ^acAatf  ^JacA  CLnJi    ^aicAUn  ^Ba^idvL 

At  all  draleri.    Send  6c.  for  Sample  of  F»tr«a. 
Alfred  H.  Smith  Co..  2S  West  33d  St.,  Nevr  York 


16 

collection  of  gold  and  silver  plate,  jewels  and 
works  of  art  bestowed  on  the  heiress  of  Crocker 
millions.  Mrs.  Whitman  told  a  friend  that  much 
cif  the  silver  plate  and  many  bits  of  valuable 
bric-a-brac  would  be  left  in  her  California  home 
at  San  Mateo.  The  remainder  of  the  collection 
will  be  duly  installed  in  the  Fifth  avenue  man- 
sion to  be  occupied  by  the  Whitmans  in  New 
York. 


Templeton  Didn't  Ktiow 

I  have  just  heard  that  Jennie  Crocker  kept  her 
engagement  to  Malcolm  Whitman  an  absolute 
secret  up  to  the  time  of  the  formal  announce- 
ment. When  I  say  "an  absolute  secret,"  I  mean 
it  literally.  Most  secrets  are  entrusted  to  a 
favored  few,  but  not  even  her  brother  Templeton 
Crocker  or  her  grandmother  Mrs.  Easton  knew 
that  Jennie  was  engaged  until  she  wired  the  news 
from  New  York.  Just  how  she  managed  to  keep 
so  important  a  bit  of  news  from  her  closest 
relatives  I  am  not  prepared  to  say,  but  it's  the 
fact  nevertheless.  Perhaps  the  circumstance 
that  the  courtship  was  an  epistolary  one  in  the 
main  may  help  to  account  for  Jennie's  success  in 
keeping  everybody  in  the  dark.  At  any  rate,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Templeton  Crocker  were  astonished 
beyond  measure  one  evening  about  seven  o'clock 
when  they  received  from  Jennie  in  New  York  a 
brief  wire  stating  that  she  was  prepared  to  an- 
nounce her  coming  marriage  to  Mr.  Whitman. 
They  hadn't  had  an  inkling  of  the  truth.  They 
knew  of  course  that  Jennie  and  Malcolm  were 
friends,  but  attributed  that  to  Jennie's  affection 
for  the  deceased  Mrs.  Whitman  for  whom  she 
had  been  a  bridesmaid.  That  her  heart  was  in  the 
friendship  they  learned  for  the  first  time  from  that 
short  telegram.  Templeton  Crocker  rang  up 
Mrs.  Easton  at  San  Mateo  and  read  the  wire  to 
her.  Mrs.  Easton  was  just  as  much  astonished 
as  the  Templeton  Crockcrs  were.  Needless  to 
say,  all  of  them  were  delighted  with  the  news. 
They  all  knew  Whitman  and  approved  of  him. 
Templeton  Crocker  immediately  communicated 
the  news  to  the  papers.  In  one  newspaper  of- 
fice his  telephone  call  was  answered  by  a  young 
reporter  who  failed  to  realize  the  importance  of 
the  engagement  as  a  newspaper  "story."  He  made 
a  note  of  the  names,  asked  no  questions  and  said 

Art  and  Refinement  are  Display  by  Tasteful  Attire 


Makers  of 

LADIES'   GOWNS  AND   FANCY  COSTUMES 

420  SUTTER,  near  STOCKTON  STREET 
San  Francisco,  Cal. 


Puckett's  College  of  Dancing 

Assembly  Hall 


1268  SUTTER  STREET 

between  V»n  Neu  and  Polk 

Jl  ^ore  beautiful  ^Ballroom 
Could    Hardly  Conceived 


Classes — Mond  ays .         .  Assemblies — -Fridays 
Advance  Class  and  Social — Wednesdays. 

Prirate  Lessont 

Hall  for  Rent  Phone  Franklin  118 


TOWN  TALK 

"much  obliged."  When  his  city  editor  learned 
what  he  had  done  he  went  up  in  the  air. 

Lost  California  Fortunes 

Jennie  Crocker's  is  the  third  Crocker  fortune  to 
go  to  New  York.  But  we  are  getting  used  to 
that  sort  of  thing.  Nearly  every  large  fortune 
founded  here  in  earlier  days  has  gone  away,  at 
least  in  part.  The  Mackay  fortune  which  went 
to  Clarence  and  the  Princess  Colonna  is  no 
longer  with  us.  The  Hopkins  fortune  went  to 
Boston  when  Mrs.  Hopkins  married  Searles.  The 


Photo,  H.   Pierre  Smith 


MISS   IRENE  C.AUBU 
The  youngest  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pierre  Caubu 
whose    engagement    to    Oliver    M.    Rousseau    was  an- 
nounced  recently.    The  wedding  will  take  place  when 
the   Caubus   return   from  abroad. 

Sharon  millions  went  to  England.  So  did  a  large 
part  of  the  Huntington  millions.  The  Fair  for- 
tune went  to  New  York  with  Mrs.  Oelrichs  and 
Mrs.  Willie  Vanderbilt.  The  Whitelaw  Reids  ab- 
sorbed a  large  part  of  the  Mills  money.  Part  of 
the  O'Brien  estate  went  East.  "Billy"  Bourne's 
daughter  took  her  dot  to  Ireland  when  she  be- 
came Mrs.  Vincent.  A  large  part  of  the  Murphy 
fortune  crossed  the  continent  too.  Much  of  the 
Parrott  money  has  been  spent  abroad.  And  the 
Hastings  millions  went  the  same  way.  But  to 
balance  matters,  we  have  Mrs.  Carolan  who 
brought  hither  the  Pullman  millions.  And  there 
are  others. 


Miss  Clover  Was  There 

Miss  Eudora  Clover  of  Washington  was 
among  the  Eastern  guests  who  came  in 
for  a  lot  of  attention  at  the  wedding.  She 
was  there  with  her  parents  Admiral  and 
Mrs.  Richardson  Clover  who  came  from  their 
summer  home  at  St.  Helena  for  the  occasion. 
Mrs.  Clover  was  a  belle  in  society  as  Dora  Miller, 
when  the  bride's  mother  was  a  girl  in  the  same 
circles.  The  rumor  that  Miss  Clover  is  engaged 
to  young  Franklyn  Ellis  of  Washington  who  is 
now  in  California  caused  interested  speculation. 
A  friend  ventured  to  ask  the  Admiral  if  rumor 
was  true  and  received  an  evasive  answer:  "Ask 
Mrs.  Clover."  As  for  Miss  Eudora  she  neither 
denied  nor  affirmed.  Young  Ellis  is  the  son  of 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  Ellis  whose  sensational 
divorce  suit  startled  Washington  society  last 
week.  Mrs.  Ellis  is  a  close  friend  of  Mrs.  Taft. 
They  were  girls  together  in  Cincinnati.  She  has 
filed  suit  for  absolute  divorce  the  papers  in  the 
case  being  sealed.  Since  this  action  was  taken 
her  husband  has  resigned  his  membership  in  the 
fashionable  Chevy  Chase  and  Metropolitan  Clubs. 
Their  son,  the  reputed  fiancee  of  Miss  Clover, 


July  20,  1912 


Any  Victrola 

On  Easy  Terms 

Whether  you  get  the  new  low  price 
Victrola  at  $15  or  the  Victrola  "de  luxe"  at 
$200,  get  a  Victrola.  At  a  very  small  ex- 
pense you  can  enjoy  a  world  of  entertain- 
ment. Victrolas  $15  to  $200.  Any  Victrola 
on  easy  terms. 


Sherman  {Pay  &  Go. 

Stnnway  ud  Other  Pianoi  Apollo  and  Cecilian  Player  Piano* 
Victor  Talkini  MacluDa    SKmI  Muiic  and  Miuical  Merchandiaa 

K«arn7  and  Sutter  SlTceta,  San  Franciaco 
Fourtaanth  and  Clay  Streeta,  Oakland 


i  Sutter  1  572  Cyril  Arnautou 

Phones    Home  C-3970  Henry  Riiunan 

(  Home  C-478l---Holcl  C.  Lahademe 

New  Delmonico's 

Restaurant  and  Hotel 

NOW  OPEN 

Best  French  Dinner  in  the  City  with  Wine,  J  1. 00 
Banquet  Haiti  and  Private  Dining  Rooms 
Music  Every  Evening 
V isi  ors  to  San  Francisco  are  cordially  invited 

362  Geary  Street        San  Francisco 


FIOR  d'lTALIA 

RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN  DINNER  A  SPECIALTY 

The  cuisine  is  unsurpassed.    An  ideal  place 
where  one  can  take  his  family  or  friends. 
Banquet  Rooms  and  Private  Rooms 

492  BROADWAY  ::  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phonei:  Douglaa  1504         Home  C  1504 


6  PER  CENT  GOLD  CERTIFICATES 

Invest  your  surplus  capital  in  the  Coast 
Cities  Improvement  Company's  6%  net  in- 
terest bearing,  guaranteed  profit  sharing 
certificates.  Particulars  at  office  or  by  mail. 
Send  for  prospectus.  COAST  CITIES 
IMPROVEMENT  CO.,  1550  Broadway, 
Oakland. 


La  Questa 

One  of  the  FINES!  RED  WINES 
in  the  jcorld.  Served  at  First-Class 
Hotels,  Cafes,  Clubs,  Etc. 

Producer,  E.  H.  RIXFORD 

California-Pacific  Building,   105  Montgomery  St. 

San  Francisco 


MANZANITA  HALL 

PALO  ALTO.  CALIFORNIA 

Makes  a  specialty  of  preparing  boys  and  young 
men  for  entrance  to  the  universities.  The  location 
adjacent  to  Stanford  I'niversity  and  to  Palo  Alto, 
a  town  of  remarkable  culture,  makes  possible  a  school 
life  of  unusual  advantages  and  privileges. 

Twentieth    year    opens     .August     27,     1912.  For 
catalogue  and  specific  information,  address 
W.  A.  SHEDD,  Head  Master 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


17 


is  said  to  have  come  to  California  to  avoid  the 
notoriety  of  his  parents'  domestic  troubles  and 
has  been  visiting  in  St.  Helena.  Eudora  Clover 
is  one  of  the  heiresses  of  Washington  society  and 
the  Ellis  family  is  wealthy  so  the  marriage  would 
unite  two  large  fortunes. 


Dorothy  Tennant  Married 

Some  of  the  New  York  papers  gave  a  lot  of 
space  the  other  day  to  news  of  the  marriage  of 
Dorothy  Tennant,  the  actress,  to  Robert  M.  Catts, 
concerning  whose  financial  standing  there  has 
been  much  speculation  and  various  contradictory 
reports.  Mrs.  Catts  is  described  as  "the  daughter 
of  John  Tennant,  a  wealthy  real  estate  man  of 
San  Francisco."  This  description  is  misleading. 
Dorothy  Tennant  was  very  well  known  in  San 
Francisco  about  ten  years  ago,  but  not  as  the 
daughter  of  a  wealthy  real  estate  dealer.  She 
came  from  San  Jose  where  her  family  was  at  one 
time  quite  prominent  and  in  prosperous  circum- 
stances. In  this  city  she  worked  as  a  stenog- 
rapher in  the  office  of  Hall  McAllister,  the  at- 
torney, and  she  went  on  the  stage  about  the  time 
that  he  abandoned  the  law  and  took  to  the  drama. 
A  beautiful  and  most  vivacious  girl  was  Dorothy 
Tennant,  somewhat  of  the  same  temperament  as 
Eleanor  Sears,  given  to  athletics,  skilled  as  an 
equestrienne,  a  fine  shot  and  so  fond  of  pistol 
practice  that  she  carried  a  pistol  on  her  graceful 
person.  Some  years  ago  she  went  to  England  to 
visit  her  cousin,  the  wife  of  Sir  Henry  Stanley 
the  explorer,  also  a  Tennant,  and  christened 
Dorothy,  too.  The  Californian  girl  had  a  taste 
of  English  country  life,  and  astonished  the  na- 
tives with  her  riding  feats.  There  were  several 
daughters  in  the  Tennant  family — Emily  who 
married  Henry  Spring  of  San  Jose;  Mary,  who 
married  Robert  Gardner  of  San  Rafael,  and  Mar- 
guerite who  married  Otto  Zeigler,  the  cyclist. 
When  last  seen  in  this  city  Dorothy  Tennant  was 
with  the  College  Widow  Company.  According 
to  the  Eastern  press  her  marriage  with  Catts 
took  place  last  December,  but  the  fact  was  known 
only  to  a  few  friends  along  Broadway  until  the 
other  day.  In  July  of  last  year  they  were  in- 
jured while  joy-riding  and  Miss  Tennant  spent 
several  weeks  in  a  hospital. 


Many  September  Brides 

September  promises  to  be  as  prolific  in  wed- 
dings in  the  smart  set  as  June.  Five  of  society's 
belles  will  be  September  brides  while  August  will 
see  but  one  fashionable  wedding,  that  of  Mrs. 
Sarah  Stetson  Winslow  and  Colonel  Hamilton 
Wallace.  This  will  be  a  very  quiet  affair  in  the 
first  week  of  August  at  the  bride's  Pacific  avenue 
home  and  Mrs.  Winslow  has  declared  the  guest 
list  will  number  just  six.  They  may  be  counted 
as  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robert  Oxnard,  the  latter  be- 
ing Mrs.  Winslow's  sister,  the  Harry  Stetsons, 
Miss  Ruth  Winslow  and  a  brother  ofificer  of  the 
groom  who  will  serve  as  best  man.  Colonel 
Wallace  who  is  connected  with  the  pay  depart- 
ment of  the  army  in  this  city  has  secured  only 
ten  days'  leave  of  absence  so  the  wedding  journey 
will  be  a  short  one.  Of  the  September  brides 
Miss  Julia  Langhorne  who  will  wed  Lieutenant 
Parker  on  the  fourteenth  is  the  most  important 
and  probably  the  most  popular  bride  of  the  sea- 
son. She  was  one  of  the  bridesmaids  at  the 
Crocker-Whitman  wedding  and  displayed  her  en- 
gagement ring  for  the  first  time.  It  is  of  sap- 
phires and  diamonds,  the  stones  quite  large  and 
set  in  platinum.  Miss  Marian  Miller  will  prob- 
ably prove  the  beauty  of  the  group.  On  the 
eleventh  she  will  be  the  bride  of  Bernard  Ford 
who  by  the  way  is  grandson  of  a  former  Lord 
Mayor  of  London,  and  nephew  of  Sir  Sydnciy 
Waterlow  who  married  a  Miss  Hamilton  of  this 
city.  His  mother  was  Hilda  Waterlow.  The 
s:inie  week  will  see  Miss  Ruth  Casey  the  bride 


of  Arthur  Brown  and  the  beauty  of  debutante's 
row  last  winter,  Miss  Isabel  Beaver  will  be  maid 
of  honor.  Miss  Bessie  Ashton  and  John  Piggott 
will  be  married  later  in  the  month  as  will  Miss 
Miriam  McNear  and  Leo  Korbel.  The  last  will 
be  a  country  wedding  at  the  McNear  place  near 
Petaluma.  Only  one  of  the  brides  will  be  lost 
to  San  Francisco  society.  Julia  Langhorne  as 
Mrs.  Parker  will  live  at  Newport  Navy  Yard 
where  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Malcolm  Whitman  have 
promised  to  visit  her  in  the  fall 


Wins  Beaux  Arts  Honors 

John  McMullin  is,  I  hear,  winning  honors  at 
the  Beaux  Arts  and  his  venerable  grandmother 
who  went  to  Paris  last  month  to  visit  him  is  well 
pleased  with  his  progress.  He  will  spend  an- 
other year  studying  architecture  and  may  decide 
to  enter  one  of  the  important  Eastern  firms. 
Young  McMullin  is  said  to  have  evidenced  talent 
of  a  high  order  and  from  all  accounts  bids  fair 
to  be  famous  one  of  these  days.  His  pretty  sis- 
ter. Miss  Eliza  McMullin,  is  at  present  visiting 
him  in  Paris.  The  European  trip  of  Mrs.  McMul- 
lin was  an  unusual  undertaking  for  a  lady  of  her 
years.  She  is  well  past  the  three  score  and  ten 
mark,  but  planned  the  journey  with  enthusiasm 
and  is  enjoying  the  Paris  shops  and  theaters  with 
all  the  zest  of  her  young  granddaughter.  The 
family  party  will  tour  Germany  later  in  the  sea- 
son. 


She  Has  Changed  Her  Name 

Any  bit  of  news  about  Mrs.  Gouraud,  the  for- 
mer Amy  Crocker  of  San  Francisco,  is  accept- 
able. So  let  me  chronicle  the  fact  that  she  has 
changed  her  name.  She  is  no  longer  Amy  bui 
Aimee.  The  change  seems  appropriate.  In  the 
first  place  Mrs.  Gouraud  now  makes  her  home  in 
Paris,  and  Aimee  is  distinctively  French.  But 
more  important  than  this,  Aimee  fits  the  per- 
sonality of  our  temperamental  expatriate  where 
Amy  does  not.  Amy  is  mid-Victorian,  domestic, 
comfortable.  It  is  housewifely  and  uninspiring. 
An  Amy  presides  at  the  range  or  dusts  the  parlor, 
but  seems  out  of  place  presiding  over  a  salon 
where  the  low  lights  awaken  eerie  thoughts  and 
subtle  perfumes  soothe  the  senses.  Aimee.  on 
the  other  hand,  is  a  name  consecrated  to  the 
emotions.  It  means  Beloved.  It  connotes  tni" 
varying  moods  of  one  who  has  experienced  the 
grand  passion.  So  it  is  eminently  fitting  that 
Mrs.  Gouraud  should  be  Aimee  and  not  Amy. 
I  wonder  that  she  didn't  make  the  change  years 
ago. 


Her  Magnificent  Home 

Mrs.  Aimee  Gouraud  lives  in  a  magnificent 
house  in  the  Rue  Alfred-Dehodencq  which  is  one 
of  the  new  streets  off  the  Bois  in  the  Avenue 
Henri  Martin.    When  she  chose  the  house  she 


was  impatient  to  occupy  it,  so  she  employed  an 
army  of  workmen  who  labored  night  and  day, 
completing  the  necessary  alterations  within  a 
week.  Her  gorgeous  furniture,  including  a  col- 
lection of  Chinese  and  other  Eastern  pieces,  has 
been  installed.  The  house  is  now  ready  for  the 
series  of  brilliant  and  bizzare  entertainments 
which  Mrs.  Aimee  plans  to  give  this  season.  One 
of  the  guests  at  some  of  these  will  be  Truly 
Shattuck.  A  friendship  has  sprung  up  between 
Aimee  and  Truly,  and  they  are  a  good  deal  to- 
gether in  Paris. 


Tait's  Very  Latest 

When  it  comes  to  doing  the  "right  thing"  we 
must  take  off  our  hats  to  John  Tait.  His  latest 
departure  from  the  ordinary  is  giving  away  a 
beautiful,  high  power  $1250  Oakland  automobile 
— the  prize  car.  The  machine  is  to  be  given  to 
lady  patrons  of  the  cafe  and  full  particulars  as 
to  how  the  car  will  be  awarded  will  be  given  every 
afternoon  in  the  Tait  Cafe,  "  'tween  the  hours  of 
3  and  6  o'clock."  "  'Tween  the  hours  of  3  and  6 
o'clock"  is  another  innovation  started  by  John 
Tait.  Every  afternoon  between  the  hours  men- 
tioned he  has  arranged  a  special  treat  for  patrons 
of  the  place.  When  asked  what  the  "treat" 
would  be  he  replied,  "Come  and  see."  And  judg- 
ing by  his  past  efforts  we  can  imagine  the  "treat" 
being  well  worth  while.  There's  a  particularly 
good  entertainment  bill  at  this  popular  cafe  this 
week  and  the  cuisine  and  service  are  up  to  the 
usual  high  standard. 


In  the  Social  Spotlight 

Among  the  recent  arrivals  at  Hotel  Rowarden- 
nan  are  Reginald  Paget,  Arthur  Paget  and  W.  V. 
Bokklen. 

Motoring  parties,  often  consisting  of  golfers, 
think  nothing  of  making  the  run  down  to  Del 
Monte  the  latter  part  of  the  week  and  returning 
home  Monday  or  Tuesday.  But  all  roads  lead 
to  Del  Monte.  A  few  weeks  ago  Roy  Francis 
and  Frank  Bryant  came  by  the  air  route.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Henry  Shaw  accompanied  by  Mrs.  L.  E. 
Wood  and  Mr.  E.  M.  Wood  arrived  early  in  the 
week  in  Mr.  Shaw's  fine  Cadillac.  Captain  and 
Mrs.  Barneson  and  Miss  Barneson  arrived  Thurs- 
day in  his  Cadillac,  while  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  L. 
Barneson  drove  a  Stutz.  Miss  Kiingston  was 
also  a  member  of  this  family  party  which  was 
making  quite  a  tour  down  the  coast.  Mr.  G. 
Bliss  Hermann  and  Mr.  Gerald  F.  Hermann  with 
Dr.  Frank  Kinslow  went  down  Thursday  for  a 
few  days'  visit.  Mr.  Herman  drives  a  fine  Winton 
car.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  Silverberg  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Maurice  Liebmann  have  been  playing  golf 
for  some  time.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wm.  Kauffmann 
have  just  returned  home  after  an  enjoyable  week. 
Mr.  Whitney  Palache,  a  frequent  visitor  from 
San   Francisco,  paid  a  week-end  visit. 


ALL  KNIT  GOODS  SPECIALTIES 


\  TEXT  time  you  buy  a  Sweater  Coat  or  Bathing  Suit, 
get  a  "G.  &  M."    Styles  right  up  to  the  minute. 

Fabrics  of  the  finest,  most  dependable  quality.  Largest 
assortments.    Prices  always  moderate. 

Headquarters  for  the  famous  line  of  "G.  &  M."  Hosiery  and  "G.  &  M."  Underwear. 


The  Mark  of  Quality 

Grant  Avenue,  at  Post  Street, 


San  Francisco,  Cal. 


It 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


Wild  Animals  1  Have  Met 


By  Edward  F.  O'Day 


All  the  years  of  an  adventurous  life  I  have 
hunted  tlie  dangerous  animals  of  the  jungle  and 
the  veldt.  Like  Spartacus,  I  have  "never  yet 
lowered  my  arm";  like  Bwana  Tumbo,  I  have 
never  missed  a  shot.  As  a  child  all  the  animals 
of  Xoah's  Ark  succumbed  to  my  prowess.  I  can 
recall  vividly  tearing  tigers  limb  from  limb,  be- 
heading elephants  and  sucking  the  paint  off 
ferocious  leopards.  Later  on  I  subdued  grizzlies 
with  Harry  Castlcman  and  potted  giraffes  in  the 
Transvaal  with  Captain  Mayne  Reid.  Stanley 
and  Livingston  and  Paul  du  Chaillu  were  my 
pals  on  many  a  ticklish  expedition  against  the 
man-eaters  of  darkest  Africa.  Sanford  and  Mer- 
ton  and  I  were  present  on  that  interesting  occa- 
sion when  the  soft-hearted  Greek  drew  the  thorn 
froin  the  lion's  paw.  But  such  exploits  were 
mere  child's  play  to  those  which  came  later. 
With  Sir  John  Mandeville  I  penetrated  the 
mysterious  recesses  of  Prester  John's  domain 
(where  Marco  Polo  had  been  before  us)  and 
subdued  tliose  monstrous  ants  that  dug  the 
precious  metal  from  Mother  Earth.  I  accom- 
panied Baron  Munchausen  on  many  a  perilous 
trip,  and  can  verify  all  the  stories  told  by  that 


greater  than  Doctor  Cook.  With  Lewis  Car- 
roll I  stalked  the  jabberwock  to  his  lair.  With 
Childe  Harold  I  dared  the  aw^ful  beasts  of  dark- 
ness that  hindered  the  onward  march  to  the  Dark 
Tower.  I  lent  a  hand  when  old  Hercules  chopped 
the  Hydra  and  gave  moral  support  when  St. 
George  lambasted  the  dragon.  Othello  and  I 
bagged  many  a  savage  animal  in  the  land  of  the 
Anthropophagi.  With  dear  old  Sir  Thomas 
Browne  I  hunted  specimens  of  the  basilisk  that 
slew  with  its  glance,  prepared  griffins  for  the 
taxidermist  and  twisted  the  sharp  weapon  of  the 
unicorn.  1  was  with  Ursus,  "the  first  man  who 
threw  the  bull,"  when  he  laid  the  aurochs  low. 
More  sophisticated  hunting  was  that  on  which  I 
accompanied  a  poet  when  he  "followed  some  rov- 
ing lion's  spoor  across  the  copper-colored  plain" 
or  hunted  "the  river-horses  in  the  slime"  or 
tracked  "the  ivory-horned  tragelaphos."  In  short, 
all  my  days  I  have  been  a  Ximrod,  dealing 
bloody  execution  upon  dumb  brutes.  I  have 
hunted  through  the  lairs  of  Woodwards  Gardens, 
through  the  jungled  Zoos  of  three  Chutes, 
through  the  corridors  of  the  gone  Academy  of 
Science,  through  the  glass  cages  of  Sutro's  Baths 
and  through  all  the  circuses  that  ever  came  to 


town,  not  forgetting  the  perilous  animal  acts  at 
the  Orpheum  and  Adgie  with  her  lions.  But 
never  in  a  career  of  such  hair-breadth  adventure, 
never  since  with  Teddy  I  waylaid  the  situtungo 
and  the  bushbuck  and  the  bongo,  subdued  the 
wagtail  and  the  mongoose  and  the  hartebcest,  the 
springhaas  and  the  dikdik;  never  since  I  dipped 
into  the  nambypamby  pages  of  Seton-Thompson 
(or  is  it  Thompson-Seton?)  and  decided  that  he 
knew  no  wild  animals  that  I  should  care  to  know — 
never,  I  repeat,  have  I  had  such  good  hunting 
as  I  had  the  other  night  when  I  went  to  Africa 
with  Paul  Rainey.  I  had  the  time  of  my  life 
trapping  the  gentle  jackal  and  the  handsome 
hyena.  I  absolutely  forgot  my  danger  as  I  fol- 
lowed the  leopard  to  his  lair  and  laid  him  low. 
The  tough  rhinoceros  had  no  terrors  for  me. 
The  lion  keeled  over  at  the  crack  of  my  rifle,  and 
I  nonchalantly  lit  my  pipe!  It  was  a  great  ex- 
perience. As  you  have  seen,  my  hunting  ex- 
periences have  been  many  and  perilous,  but  my 
hat  is  off  to  Paul  Rainey  and  his  splendid  dogs. 
They  can  hunt  with  me  again  any  day  in  the' 
week. 


Bessie  as  "The  Rose"  Again 

In  compliance  with  popular  demand  the  Alcazar 
management  has  decided  to  retain  Bessie  Bar- 
riscale  and  "The  Rose  of  the  Rancho"  a  second 
week,  commncing  next  Monday  night,  which  will 
aflford  positively  the  last  opportunities  to  sec  the 
charming  little  actress  in  the  famous  Belasco- 
Tully  play.  It  was  planned  to  have  her  appear 
in  another  of  her  successful  vehicles,  but  the  in- 
ability of  thousands  of  her  admirers  to  again  wit- 
ness her  entrancing  portrayal  of  Juanita  and  their 
request  that  it  be  continued  one  more  week 
necessitated  the  change  of  schedule.  She  has 
scored  the  greatest  artistic  and  pecuniary  suc- 
cess in  the  history  of  the  O'Farrell-street  home 
of  drama,  and  her  entrance  to  stardom  in  New 
York' will  be  accompanied  by  very  pleasant  mem- 
ory of  the  farewell  tributes  bestowed  upon  lur  by 
San  Francisco.  It  is  the  unanimous  opinion  that 
"The  Rose  of  the  Rancho"  has  never  been  given 
a  more  perfect  production  at  the  Alcazar  than  it 
is  now  receiving.  While  the  lion's  share  of  the 
acting  honors  are  awarded  Miss  Barriscale,  of 
course,  her  support  comes  in  for  no  small  share 
of  the  plaudits  so  lavishly  bestowed  after  each 
curtain  fall.  Asa  Lee  Willard  who  was  especially 
engaged  to  play  the  heroic  Kearny,  gives  a  more 
than  satisfactory  performance,  and  Andrew  Ben- 
nison  who  was  borrowed  to  fill  the  role  of  Juan- 
ita's  erratic  Spanish  suitor,  has  proved  himself 
a  young  actor  of  rare  promise.  Burt  Wcsner  as 
the  Padre,  Louis  Bennison  as  the  land-grabber, 
Charles  Gunn  as  the  militia  officer,  Adele  Bel- 
garde  as  the  little  senorita's  haughty  mother  and 
Viola  Leach  as  the  coquettish  Trinidad  are  more 
than  equal  to  the  requirements  of  their  respective 
roles,  and  none  of  the  minor  characters  are  in- 
adequately represented. 


"The  Drums  of  Oude"  at  the  Orpheum 

There  will  be  seven  new  acts  in  next  week's 
Orpheum  bill.  Chief  among  them  will  be  "The 
Drums  of  Oude,"  a  one-act  drama  produced  and 


Gossip  of  the  Theatre 

presented  by  David  Belasco.  Its  author  is  Aus- 
tin Strong,  and  it  packed  the  Duke  of  York 
Theatre,  London,  for  two  years.  The  scene  is 
the  tower  of  an  ancient  palace  in  India  where  a 
few  British  soldiers  with  their  women  folk  are 


LUCIA    LOTTIE  COLLINS 

The   English  singing  comedienne,  at  the  Pantages 
Theater. 

preparing  for  the  coming  of  the  Sepoys.  The 
Sepoys  have  taken  advantage  of  the  absence  of 
the  regiment  usually  stationed  at  the  garrison, 
and  unless  it  returns  in  time  there  is  but  one 
thing  left  for  the  beseiged  soldiers  to  do  and  that 
is  to  blow  up  the  powder  magazine  beneath  their 


feet  and  thus  save  the  women  from  the  unspeak- 
able fate  which  will  be  theirs  if  they  fall  into  the 
hands  of  the  fanatical  and  barbarous  Hindustani. 
The  story  is  thrilling  and  every  moment  is  tense 
with  dramatic  suspense.  When  the  climax  comes 
with  one  of  the  most  impressive  battle  scenes 
ever  created  by  the  masterly  combination  of  ar- 
tistically used  stage  effects  and  the  power  of  sug- 
gestion, an  appeal  is  made  to  the  enthusiasm  of 
the  audience  that  it  finds  it  impossible  to  resist 
The  cast  includes  E.  J.  RatclifFe,  Jack  Standing, 
Harry  Rose,  John  Thomson.  W.  S.  Phillips,  H. 
H.  McCollum  and  Eleanor  Scott  L'Estelle.  Lew 
Sully,  the  popular  minstrel,  will  appear  in  an 
original  conceit  entitled  "Feminine  Fads"  in 
which  he  will  introduce  his  famous  burlesque  of 
.Alice  Lloyd.  The  Four  Florimonds  are  a  family 
'  f  foreign  equilibrists  and  jugglers  of  the  free 
ladders.  Stein,  Hume  and  Thomas,  "the  Melod- 
ious Merrymakers,"  also  come  next  week.  Mad- 
emoiselle Sealby  and  Monsieur  Duclos,  two  fam- 
ous French  dancers  and  the  creators  of  the  "No 
Clasp  Waltz."  will  be  seen  for  the  first  time  in 
this  city.  Bert  Terrell,  the  Dutch  character  vo- 
("alist.  will  also  appear.  The  Eugene  Trio  are 
daring  and  clever  gymnasts.  May  Tully  will  be 
the  only  holdover  and  will  repeat  her  Reno  skit 
"The  Battle  Cry  of  Freedom." 


"The  Toad"  at  the  Greek  Theatre 

The  Musical  and  Dramatic  Committee  of  the 
University  of  California  announces  that  on  Sat- 
urday evening.  July  20,  at  8:15.  "The  Toad:  a 
Drama  of  .Ancient  Egypt."  by  Bertha  Newberry, 
will  be  produced  in  the  Greek  Theatre.  Written 
especially  for  production  in  the  open  air  and  re- 
quiring no  change  of  scene,  this  drama  which  re- 
ceived its  first  presentations  in  the  Forest  Theatre  » 
at  Carmel-by-the-Sea  on  the  third  and  fourth  of  | 
this  month,  is  admirably  adapted  for  perform- 
ance in  the  Greek  Theatre  and  an  even  more  suc- 
cessful production  than  those  in  the  forest  Theatre 
is  anticipated.    The  cast  will  be  the  same  as  at 


I 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


19 


the  initial  performances  and  includes  many  of  the 
most  prominent  members  of  the  artistic  colony. 
The  drama  contains  twenty-two  speaking  parts 
and  requires  some  seventy-five  persons  for  its 
presentation.     Popular  prices  will  prevail. 


Several  Features  at  Pantages 

On  Sunday  there  will  be  the  usual  change  of 
bill  at  Pantages,  one  of  the  many  features  being 
Jules  B.  Simon's  Seven  Aviator  Girls,  nifty  sing- 
ers and  dainty  dancers,  headed  by  Miss  Carlie 
Lowe,  well-known  in  musical  comedy.  "Happy's 
Millions"  is  a  bright  little  sketch  to  be  presented 
by  William  Morrow,  Donna  Harris  and  company. 
A  feature  of  special  interest  to  San  Francisco 
will  be  the  first  appearance  upon  the  vaudeville 
stage  of  Estelle  Allison,  well-known  in  local  so- 
ciety circles  and  an  actress  of  unusual  ability. 
She  will  present  her  own  musical  problem  play- 
let, "The  Question,"  staged  in  splendid  style  with 


ELK.\NUR  SCOTT  L'ESTEl.LK  and   E.  J.  R.VTCLIFFE 
Who    will    appear    in    David    Belasco's    production  of 
"The    Drums    of    Oude"    this    Sunday    matinee  at 
the  Orpheum. 

beautiful  scenic  accessories  and  with  capable  sup- 
port. "The  Question"  is  expected  to  create  some- 
thing of  a  sensation.  Another  feature  is  the  first 
American  appearance  of  Lucia  Lottie  Collins,  the 
famous  English  singing  comedienne  and  daughter 
of  Lottie  Collins  who  brought  "Ta-ra-ra-boom-de- 
ay"  to  America  and  first  made  that  song  famous 
in  this  country.  Miss  Collins  does  not  have  to 
depend  upon  her  mother's  reputation,  however, 
as  she  is  an  artist  of  recognized  ability  and  has 
made  great  hits  in  the  principal  English  and  Aus- 
tralian music  halls.  Many  hearty  laughs  should 
be  provided  by  Si  Jenks,  late  of  the  "Get-Rich- 
Quick-VVallingford"  company  and  a  Yankee 
monologist.  Max  Witt's  "Four  Harmonious 
Girls"  are  dainty  and  pretty  singers  and  instru- 
mentalists. The  Ausonia  Trio  are  Olympic 
gladiators.  Sunlight  Pictures,  showing  several 
surprises,  will  complete  the  bill. 


New  York  Casino  star  cast  which  includes  De 
Wolf  Hopper,  Blanche  Duffield,  Eugene  Cowles, 
George  MacFarlane,  Kate  Condon,  Arthur  Ald- 
ridge,  Viola  Gillette,  Arthur  Cunningham,  Alice 
Brady  and  Louise  Barthel  are  to  commence  their 
long  heralded  season,  limited  to  four  weeks,  of 
revivals  of  Gilbert  and  Sullivan's  most  popular 
works,  with  an  elaborate  production  of  "The 
Mikado"  the  bill  for  the  entire  first  week.  After 
the  public  has  renewed  its  acquaintance  with  this 
delicious  travesty  on  Old  Japan,  another  delight 
of  our  early  days,  "Pinafore,"  will  be  given,  this 
opera  being  scheduled  for  the  second  week.  On 
August  4  "Patience"  will  have  its  turn  and  later 
on  "The  Pirates  of  Penzance"  will  be  offered. 
It  was  two  years  ago  that  Messrs.  Shubert  and 
William  A.  Brady  with  so  many  well  known 
musical  stars  at  their  disposal  came  to  the  con- 
clusion that  the  time  was  ripe  for  a  revival  of 
these  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  operettas,  provided 
they  were  properly  cast  and  presented  with  re- 
ligious adherence  to  tradition.  That  the  man- 
agers reckoned  well  is  a  matter  of  record,  as 
every  revival  established  the  fact  that  the  wit  and 
satire  of  Gilbert  and  the  melodic  charm  and 
vivacity  of  Sullivan's  music  still  preserved  their 
potency  to  the  fullest  degree. 


Hackett  at  the  Columbia 

Beginning  Monday  night,  July  22,  James  K. 
Hackett  will  appear  in  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  at 
the  Columbia.  The  book  has  had  more  vogue, 
probably,  than  any  publication  in  recent  years, 
and  Mr.  Hackett  who  is  one  of  the  greatest  of 
latter  day  stars,  has  given  a  dramatic  version  that 
has  intensified  the  interest  in  David  Graham 
Phillips'  remarkable  story.  Those  who  have  read 
the  book,  and  are  familiar  with  Mr.  Hackett's 
work  in  other  plays,  will  readily  understand  why 
he  fits  the  role.  The  story  narrates  the  amatory 
and  professional  adventures  of  a  New  York  law- 
yer whose  love  for  an  insignificant  stenographer 
leads  him  to  break  off  his  engagement  with  an 
lieiress,  whose  father  was  an  important  client  of 
the  firm  of  which  the  younger  lawyer  was  a 
member.  He  leaves  the  firm  and  marries  the 
stenographer.  His  clients  were  taken  away  from 
liim;  his  income  declined  and  disappeared  and  he 
was  on  the  verge  of  ruin,  when  a  chance  came 
for  him  to  turn  the  tables  on  his  enemy.  In  that 
hour  his  wife  left  him,  and  embittered  against  her 
and  the  world  at  large,  he  set  to  work  with  heroic 
energy  and  ground  his  enemy  into  submission, 
and  rehabilitated  himself  again  in  the  financial 
world.  Mr.  Hackett,  as  Frederick  Norman,  has 
another  characterization  to  add  to  his  gallery  of 
famous  stage  portraits.  In  the  admirable  cast 
that  will  be  seen  in  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  and 
other  plays  that  are  to  have  their  premieres  here 
are  E.  M.  Holland,  Frazer  Coulter,  Joseph  Her- 
bert, Frank  Burbeck,  Brandon  Tynan,  Mrs. 
Thomas  Whiffen,  Beatrice  Beckley,  Lily  Cahill, 
Olive  Oliver,  Mabel  Inslee,  Elaine  Innescourt, 
Albert  Dantzer,  Charles  Lane,  Eva  Vincent,  Fred. 
A.  Sullivan  and  others. 


The  Gilbert-Gullivan  Operas  at  the  Cort 

At  the  Cort,  beginning  Sunday  evening,  the 


"Apostles  of  Mirth" 

That  is  what  Press  Woodruff  and  Cyrus  Brown- 
lee  Newton  call  themselves.  They  have  com- 
bined their  laugh-provoking  and  elocutionary  re- 
sources, much  as  Twain  and  Cable  did  in  the  old 
days,  and  after  a  tour  of  the  Californian  summer 
resorts  will  go  on  the  road  for  a  long,  and  they 
hope,  a  prosperous  season.  Both  are  well  known 
in  San  Francisco  and  elsewhere,  and  their  tour 
begins  under  favorable  auspices.  Woodruff's 
specialty  is  humorous  monologue,  while  that  of 
Newton  is  emotional  recitation.  To  the  summer 
resort  guests  looking  for  novelty  their  coming 
should  be  particularly  welcome. 


AMUSEMENTS 

•8*' 

com 


Leading  Theatre 

Ellia  and  Market 
Phone  Sutter  2460 


Last  Time  Tonight  Paul  J.  Rainey's  African  Hunt  Pictures 
Beginning  Tomorrow    (Sunday)  Night 
The  New  York  Casino  Star  Cast 

De   Wolf  Hopper 
Blanche   Duffield  Geo.  MacFarlane 

Kate    Condon  Arthur  Aldridgc 

Viola  ( iillette  Arthur  Cunningham 

Alice  lirady  Louise  Barthel 

Eugene  Cowles 

In  a  Revival  Festival  of  Gilbert  &  Sullivan's  Greatest  Comic 
Operas  Presenting  for  the  First  Week 

"THE  MIKADO" 

Second  Week — "H.  M.  S.  Pinafore,"  with  Productions  of 
"Patience"    anrl    "Tlie    Pirates   of    Penzance"    to  follow. 
Price — 50c  to  $2.00. 


ALCAZAR  THEATRE 

O'Karrell,  near  Powell.    Phones,  Kearny  2  and  Home  C  445.'i 
Monday  Evening,  July  22nd,  Begins  the  Second  and  Final 
Week    of    BESSIE    BARRISCALE,    Assisted    by  .  the 
.\lcazar  Company,   in   David   Belasco  and  Richard 
Walton  Tully's  Famous  Play  of  Early  California 

THE  ROSE  OF  THE  RANCHO 

A    M  agnificent    Pictorial  Production 
Prices:   Night,  25c  to  $1.00;  Matinee,  25c  to  50c. 
Matinee:   Thursday,   Saturday   and  Sunday. 


COLUMBIA  THEATRE 

The  Leading  Playhouse.    Geary  and  Mason  St« 
Phones,  Franklin  150  and  Home  C  578J 

Beginning  Monday,  July  22ntl 
Matinees  Wednesdays  and  Saturdays 
Special  Prices  at  Wednesday  Matinee,  25c,  50c,  75c  and  $1. 
Evenings  and  Saturday  Matinee,  $1.50  to  25c. 
JAMES  K. 


HACKETT 


and  his  company  of 
FAMOUS  NEW  YORK  PLAYERS 
In  the  dramatization  of  David  Graham  Philipp's  Story 
"THE  GRAIN  OF  DUST" 

No  Sunday  Performances 


Pantage's  Theatre 

Market  Street,  Opposite  Mason 

Week  of  Sunday,  July  21st 
SEVEN  AVIATOR  GIRLS 
With  Carlie  Lowe;  William  Morrow  &  Co.,  Presenting 
"Happy's  Millions";  Ausonia  Trio,  Olympic  (iladiators ; 
Estelle  Allison  &  Co.,  in  Her  Musical  Playlet,  "The  Ques- 
tion"; Lucia  Lottie  Collins,  English  Singing  Comedienne: 
Si  Jenks,  Yankee  Comedian ;  Max  Witt's  4  Harmonious 
Girls  and  Sunlight  Pictures. 

Matinee  Daily  at  2:30.  Nights,  7:15  and  9:15.  Sunday 
and  Holidays  Matinees  at  1:30  and  3:30.  Nights  Con- 
tinuous from  6  :30. 

Prices — 10c,  20c  and  30c. 


Safest  and  > 
Magnificfi 
Theatre  ii 

O'f  ^RRt\-\-  all  POV^tVV  America 


Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afternoon.  Matinee  Every  Da> 
A  GREAT  NEW  SHOW 

"THE  DRUMS  OF  OUDE"   on  .  . 

drama  by  ,\ustin  Strong  presentcil  and  produced  by  DAVID 
liELASCO;  LEW  SULLY,  the  Popular  iVliiistrcl;  FOUR 
FLORIMONDS,  Jugglers  on  Free  Ladders;  STEIN,  HUME 
and  THOMAS;  SEALBY  &  DUCLOS;  BERT  TERRELL; 
EUGENE.  TRIO;  NEW  DAYLIGHT  MOTION  PIC- 
TURE.S.  Last  week  of  MAY  TULLY  &  CO.  in  "THE 
BATTLE  CRY  OF  FREEDOM." 

Evening   Prices,   10c,   25c,   50c,   75c.     Box   Seats,  $1.00. 
Matinee  Prices  (except  Sundays  and  Holidays),  10c,  25c,  50c. 
Phones,  Douglas  70  and  Home  C  1570. 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


The  Financial  Outlook 


By  R.  E.  Mulcahy 


Stocks — Finding  in  the  elimination  of  the  sur- 
plus reserve  of  the  Clearing  House  banks  the  am- 
munition which  they  needed  for  continuing  their 
attack  upon  speculative  securities,  the  bear  trad- 
ers in  the  stock  exchange  made  a  successful  raid 
on  the  list.    Prices  in  the  most  active  stocks 
dropped  from  one  to  three  points  and  some  of 
the  specialties  showed  even  heavier  losses.  Prom- 
inent in  the  drive  was  a  Boston  operator  of  spec- 
tacular campaign  renown  in  copper  properties. 
The  attack  was  directed  especially  against  the 
copper  and  steel  issues.    Extensive  unloading  of 
steel  was  explained  by  the  bear  pool  as  being 
due  to  the  belief  that  the  Stanley  congressional 
committee   was   preparing  a    report   of   an  ex- 
tremely   adverse    character    on    the  company. 
Selling  was  also  said  to  be  based  on  the  under- 
standing that  the  tariff  on  foreign  steel  products 
will   be   lowered    materially  in   the   revision  of 
present  duties.    Only  half-hearted  support  was 
given  to  the  market  by  the  banking  interests  un- 
til toward  the  close  of  the  week  when  there  was 
a  gradual  hardening  of  prices  with  a  fair  rally. 
The  selling  was  thought  to  be  almost  entirely  in 
the  nature  of  an  extension  of  the  short  account. 
All  efforts  on  the  part  of  the  diminished  bull 
forces  to  explain  that  the  wiping  out  of  the  sur- 
plus reserve  of  the  Clearing  House  institutions 
was  due  merely  to  the  heavy  July  interest  and 
dividend  disbursements  and  that  this  reserve  will 
soon  be  restored  to  foimer  proportions  by  the  re 
turn  of  a  large  part  of  the  money  so  distributea, 
proved  futile.    The  bear  contingent  selected  the 
weakened  condition  of  the  banks  as  an  excuse 
rather  than  as  a  well  founded  reason  for  its  sell- 
ing operations.    Despite  the  weakened  bank  con- 
ditions the  call  money  markets  ruled  around  3 
per  cent.    Crop  reports  continue  very  favorable, 
and  we  see  nothing  to  warrant  a  further  decline 
in   stocks  and  advise  purchases  at  the  market. 

Wheat — The  important  feature  in  the  wheat 
situation  during  the  past  week  was  the  report  of 
the  agricultural  crop  bureau.  The  yield  of  win- 
ter wheat  was  given  at  358  million  bushels,  and 
the  spring  wheat  as  271  million  bushels,  making 
a  total  of  629  million  bushels  compared  with  703 
million  last  year.  It  must  be  remembered  that 
the  condition  on  the  Pacific  Coast  is  very  high, 
indicating  a  yield  of  110  million  bushels  which 
is  unavailable  for  use  east  of  the  Rocky  Moun- 
tains. At  the  Government's  estimated  rate  per 
capita  of  six  bushels  for  bread  and  seed  re(|uirc- 
ments  of  87  million  people,  this  would  amount 
to  522  million  bushels.  The  amount  of  wheat  re- 
maining on  the  farms  from  last  year's  crop  is 
given  out  as  24  million  bushels.  This  amount  is 
so  small  as  to  indicate  that  farm  supplies  are 
practically  exhausted.  There  is,  to  be  sure,  a  fair 
visible  supply  left  over  from  the  previous  crop, 
hut  it  is  quite  evident  tliat  a  considerable  part 


of  this  will  be  in  requisition,  to  piece  out  some 
of  the  deficiencies  in  the  soft  winter  wheat  sec- 
tions of  the  country.  The  movement  of  wheat 
to  primary  markets  is  noticeable  only  for  the 
smallness  of  it,  and  it  is  a  complete  and  em- 
phatic verification  of  the  Government  report,  cer- 
tainly as  far  as  the  winter  wheat  crop  is  con- 
cerned, and  doubtless  will  be  more  and  more  in 
evidence  as  the  season  advances. 

Corn — The  Government  report  on  corn  was 
about  as  expected.  It  shows  an  increase  of 
2.300,000  acres  over  a  year  ago,  with  condition 
but  .4  higher  and  an  estimated  yield  of  2,811,- 
f(X),O00  bushels.  Our  reports  indicate  that  the 
crop  is  backward  and  of  a  very  irregular  growth, 
though  it  is  now  favored  with  ideal  weather.  The 
decline  has  been  severe,  the  liquidation  complete, 
the  country  movement  is  small  and  will  probably 
continue  so  until  the  new  crop  reaches  maturity. 
The  demand  is  good  and  prices  are  now  attrac- 
tive to  investors,  especially  for  the  December 
future. 

Cotton — Over  a  territory  producing  approxim- 
ately 50  per  cent  of  the  cotton  crop  the  week  was 
very  favorable,  excellent  growth  and  develop- 
ment being  made.  Over  the  remaining  50  per 
cent  there  was  little  or  no  advancement,  while 
in  a  part  of  the  territory  there  was  actual  dete- 
rioration. West  of  the  Mississippi  river  the 
crop  has  become  generally  very  promising.  The 
outlook  in  Texas  is  the  most  brilliant  in  many 
years  and  in  Oklahoma  the  crop  is  in  the  best 
condition  of  the  season.  In  Texas  there  is  a 
very  slight  need  of  rain.  A  few  localities  were 
affected  by  what  one  correspondent  terms  a  light 
drought.  All  States  east  of  the  Mississippi  suf- 
fered from  an  excess  of  moisture  and  a  lack  of 
sunshine.  Light  showers  fell  nearly  everywhere 
and  a  number  of  local  heavy  rains.  These  latter 
were  of  damaging  nature  in  /Mabama,  Georgia 
and  South  Carolina.  There  is  considerable  com- 
plaint of  grass,  but  while  some  fields  arc  foul, 
others  are  in  a  fair  state  of  cultivation.  The  cot- 
ton market  has  been  advancing  the  past  week 
due  to  numerous  reports  of  insect  damage  in  the 
southeastern  States  and  the  dry  weather  in 
Texas.  The  Liverpool  market  has  led  in  the  ad- 
vance, and  daily  prices  from  there  have  averaged 
higlier  with  pronounced  strength  in  their  spot 
markets.  Prices  at  the  close  of  the  week  are  at 
the  highest  on  this  upward  trend.  We  believe 
around  this  level  profits  should  be  accepted  and 
the  investor  should  await  a  reaction  before  again 
taking  the  long  side. 


FINANCIAL  NOTES 

The  local  stock  and  bond  market  was  firm  dur- 
ing the  week  and  remarkably  active  for  this  off 

season  of  tlie  year.    Stable  securities  that  have 


Wells  Fargo  Nevada  National  Bank 

OF   SAN  FRANCISCO 

No.  2  MONTGOMERY  STREET 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  ..  .$11,055,471.11 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   10.519,217.23 

Deposits    25,775,597.47 

Officers— Isaias  \V.  Hellman,  Pres.;  I.  W.  HcMman  Jr., 
V.-Pres. ;  F.  L.  I,ipman,  V.-Pres. ;  lames  K.  Wilson. 
V.-Pres. ;  Frank  B.  King,  Cashier;  VV.  McGavin,  Asst. 
Cashier;  E.  L.  Jacobs,  Asst.  Cashier;  C.  L.  Davis,  Asst. 
Cashier;  A.  D.  Oliver,  Asst.  Cashier;  A.  B.  Price,  Asst. 
Cashier. 

Directors— Isaias  W.  Hellman,  I.  W.  Hellman  Jr., 
Joseph  Sloss,  A.  Christeson,  Percy  T.  Morgan,  Wm. 
Haas,  F.  \V.  Van  Sicklen,  Hartland  Law,  Wm.  F. 
Hcrrin,  Henry  Roscnfeld,  John  C.  Kirkpatrick,  James 
I,.  Flood.  J.  Henry  Meyer,  Chas.  J.  Deering,  A.  H. 
Payson,  James  K.  WiUon  and  F.  L.  Lipm.nn. 
Customers  of  this  Bank  are  offered  every  facility  consis- 
tent with  prudent  banking.  New  accounts  are  invited. 
  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 


Merchants  National  Bank 
of  San  Francisco 

Corner  New  Montgomery  and  Market  Streets 

Capital.  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  .$1,763,076.98 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   1.639.482.36 

Deposits    6.368,228.50 

OFFICERS 

.\l(red  L.  Meyerstein  President 

J.    H.    Spring  Vice-President 

C.    A.    Hawkins  Vice-President 

R.  B.  Murdoch   Assistant  to  President 

W.    W.   Jones  Cashier 

Geo.  Long   Assistant  Cashier 

C.   C.   Campbell  .Assistant  Cashier 

F.    W.   Judson  Assistant  Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Geo.   C.    Boardman         W.  J.  Hotchkiss 
James  C.  Eschen  C.  A.  Hawkins 

John  M.  Keith  Gavin  McXab 

Alfred  L.  Meyerstein       Robert  Oxnard 
Frederick  F.  Sayre         John  H.  Spring 
Harry  N.  Stetson  G.  H.  I'mbsen 

A.  A.  Watkins 
The  officers  of  this  Bank  will  be  pleased  to  meet  or 

correspond    with    those    who    contemplate  making 

changes  or  opening  new  accounts. 

Safe  Deposit  Vaults  open  from  7 :30  a.  m.  to  12 

p.  m.,  Sundays  and  Holidays  included. 


The  German  Savings  and  Loan  Society 

(THE  GERMAN  BANK) 
Savings  Incorporated  1868  Commercial 

526  CAUFORNIA  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Member  of  the   Associated   Savings  Banks 
of  San  Francisco 

The  following  Branches  for  Receipt  and  Payment  of 
Deposits  only : 

MISSION   BRANCH.  2572  MISSION  STREET 
Between  21st  and  22nd 

RICHMOND    DISTRICT   BRANCH.   601  CLEMENT 
Corner  of  7th  Avenue 

HAIGHT    ST.    BRANCH.    1456    HAIGHT  ST. 
Near  Masonic  Ave. 

JUNE  29th,  1912: 

Assets   $51,140,101.75 

Capital  actually  paid  up  in  Cash   1.000,000.00 

Reserve  and  Contingent  Funds   1,656,403.80 

Employees'  Pension  Fund   140.109.60 

Number  of  Depositors    56.609 

Office  Hours:  10  o'clock  a.  m.  to  3  o'clock  p.  m..  ex- 
cept Saturdays  to  12  o'clock  m.  and  Saturday  evenings 
from  6:30  j).  m.  to  8  o'clock  p.  m.  for  receipt  of  deposits 

only- 


Telephone   DOUGLAS   2487  R.   E.  MULCAHY,  Manager 

E.  F.  HUTTON  &  CO. 

THE  PIONEER  HOUSE 

BROKERS 


Member? 
New  York  Stock  Exchange 
New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
New  York  Coffee  Exchange 
Chicago  rioard  of  Trade 


490  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Branch.  ST.  FRANCIS  HOTEL 


Two  Private  Wires  to 
Chicago   and   New  York 

Washington.  D.  C,  1301  F  Street 
Los  Angeles.  112  W.  Third  Street 
New   York,   31  33  35   New  Street 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


21 


made  gains  recently  arc  holding  their  own  and 
making  a  strong  showing. 

The  unusual  July  activity  is  not  confined  to 
the  stock  and  bond  market.  Reports  from  the 
wholesale  and  retail  trade  in  the  city  all  tell  of 
a  general  awakening  of  business.  One  of  the 
city's  largest  retailers  is  authority  for  the  state- 
ment that  the  retail  trade  is  twenty-five  per  cent 
more  active  than  at  the  same  time  last  year. 

The  jockeying  of  our  power  companies  for  posi- 
tion in  several  sections  of  the  State  is  a  matter 
that  is  now  exciting  much  interest  among  fin- 
anciers. Rivalry  among  the  several  power  in- 
terests is  exceedingly  keen.  Power  development 
is  really  in  its  infancy  in  this  State,  and  great  are 
the  potentialities  of  which  financiers  in  the  East 
and  even  in  Europe  are  well  aware.  Every  day 
or  so  one  hears  rumors  of  consolidation. 

The  demand  of  merchants  for  money  on  com- 
mercial paper  throughout  the  country  is  increas- 
ing.   Commercial  paper  is  abundant. 

The  world's  stock  of  merchantable  copper  has 
for  months  been  below  normal,  a  circumstance 
that  has  given  rise  to  rumors  of  hidden  stocks 
of  the  metal. 

Recent  inquiries  for  cars  total  10,000,  and  will 
require  100,000  tons  of  steel  to  fill.  Of  these  in- 
quiries 4,000  are  from  the  Harriman  lines. 


Varied  Types 


Nervous  Passenger  (during  fog) — But  surely 
you're  not  leaving  the  bridge,  are  you,  officer? 

Officer  (who  has  just  been  relieved) — Oh,  yes. 
It's  no  good  stopping  up  there;  you  can't  see 
anything. 


Mrs.  Nubride — I  am  heartbroken.  I  find  that 
my  husband  doesn't  resemble  my  ideal  in  the 
slightest. 

Mrs.  Wise — Then  take  my  advice,  my  dear,  and 
try  to  make  your  ideal  resemble  your  husband. 


Patience — Do  you  remember  my  sister  who  was 
on  the  stage? 
Patrice — Oh,  yes. 
Patience — Well,  she's  married. 
Patrice — Oh,  got  a  speaking  part  at  last,  has  she? 


Against  the  loss  of  your  Will,  Deeds  and 
other  valuable  papers  by  placing  them  in  a 
safe  deposit  box,  where  fire  and  burglars  are 
unknown.    4  per  year. 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults  p„^.r.^d'M.;i!'i"/u. 

John  F.  Cunninghmm,  Manager 


(Continued  from  Page  7.) 
conclusion  that  if  they  had  a  common  means  of 
communication  much  of  this  misunderstanding 
would  cease.  Esperanto  was  the  result.  Dr. 
Zamenhof  is  a  great  oculist,  but  he  has  lost 
thousands  of  dollars  because  his  heart  is  in  Es- 
peranto and  he  answers  the  call  of  the  cause 
whenever  it  comes,  forgetting  his  professional 
work. 

"It  is  very  important  to  remember  that  Es- 
peranto is  not  to  be  used  as  a  substitute  for  any 
language.  It  is  an  auxiliary  language.  When 
Esperanto  is  universally  used,  every  man  will 
have  two  languages,  his  own  and  Esperanto." 

"Do  you  think  it  will  be  universally  used?"  I 
asked. 

"I  do,"  answered  Drew.  "Esperanto  has  a 
great  future.  The  most  serious  obstacle  to  its 
immediate  adoption  by  the  intellectual  world  con- 
sists in  the  many  innovations  attempted  by 
cranks,  faddists  and  egotists  who  either  want  to 
improve  on  Zamenhof's  invention  or  to  substitute 
one  of  their  own.  Esperanto  undoubtedly  can 
be  improved  in  some  respects,  but  this  is  not  the 
time  to  make  any  changes.  Until  it  is  adopted 
as  a  universal  auxiliary  language  there  should  be 
no  changes.  Afterwards  a  World's  Congress 
could  be  called  together  for  the  purpose  of  mak- 
ing needed  reforms." 

"Are  Americans  putting  it  to  any  practical  use?" 
I  asked. 

For  answer  Frank  Drew  handed  me  an  illus- 
trated pamphlet  written  in  Esperanto.  It  was 
a  pamphlet  issued  by  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
of  Los  Angeles  and  was  devoted  to  glowing  ac- 
counts of  the  many  advantages  of  life  in  South- 
ern California. 

"That  pamphlet  will  be  read  by  people  in  every 
corner  of  the  world,"  said  Drew.  "That's  prac- 
tical enough,  isn't  it?" 

All  I  can  say  is.  Why  doesn't  the  San  I'ran- 
cisco  Chamber  of  Commerce  take  the  hint? 


Shreve  in  New  Firm 

For  the  first  time  since  its  incorporation  over 
half  a  century  ago  the  firm  of  Shreve  and  Co. 
is  without  a  Shreve.  George  R.  Shreve,  formerly 
president,  has  joined  the  jewelry  house  of  Treat 
and  Eacret,  and  the  new  firm  will  be  known 
hereafter  as  Shreve,  Treat  and  Eacret.  Inc. 
Messrs.  Treat  and  Eacret  were  formerly  with  the 
older  house,  so  the  association  will  be  the  con- 
tinuance of  an  old  business  relation.  The  new 
firm  has  already  obtained  a  solid  footing  in  this 
city. 


"Do  you  think  it  will  always  be  summer  in  the 
Garden  of  Eden?"  asked  Eve. 

"No,"  replied  Adam,  pointing  to  the  ripening 
apples.    "I  think  we  shall  have  an  early  fall." 


H  It 


ANGLO  &  LONDON 
PARIS  NATIONAL  BANK 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Paid-Up     Capital  $  4.000,000 

Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits   $  1.600,000 

Total    Resources   $40,000,000 

OFFICERS 

HERBERT  FLEISHU.XCKER  Piesiclcnt 
Sir,  GREENEn.M'M  Chairman  of  tlic  lioard 

JO.S.  FRIEDLANDER  Vice-President 
C.  F.  HUNT  Vice-President 
R.  ALTSCHUL  Cashier 
C.  R.  PARKER  Assistant  Cashier 

WM.   H.   HIGH  Assistant  Cashier 

H.  CHOYN.SKI  Assistant  Cashier 

G.   R.   BURDICK  Assistant  Cashier 

A.  L.  LANGERMAN  Secretary 


The  Last  Rapture 

(Continued  from  Page  8.) 

Then  Hortense  had  not  the  courage  to  un- 
deceive him,  to  rob  him  of  this  sweet  and  con- 
soling illusion.  Yes,  they  had  declared  war,  they 
had  chased  them,  battle  after  battle,  from  the 
stolen  lands,  they  had  regained  the  lost  flags 
which  were  rotting  in  their  museums,  and  peace 
had  been  declared,  a  lasting  and  a  glorious  peace. 
As  soon  as  he  wished,  the  trunks  would  be 
packed  and  he  would  go  back  to  Ban-Saint- 
Martin,  to  the  little  house  which  had  been  closed 
so  many  months,  in  that  quiet  street  where  the 
red  trousers  passed  today  and  where  French  was 
again  spoken.  He  would  resume  all  his  old 
habits,  he  would  go  to  the  Cafe  Colignon,  to  find 
again  all  his  old  friends  of  other  days.  But  the 
Colonel  did  not  hear;  motionless,  stifif,  eyes 
filling  with  this  fancied  apotheosis,  weeping  from 
joy,  he  murmured  incoherent  words  in  his 
bristling  moustache. 

"Ah!  The  blackguards,  the  blackguards!"  he 
repeated.  "Have  we  killed  enough  of  them? 
Have  we  humiliated  them  enough?  How  happy 
I  am,  little  sister,  how  happy  I  am!  And  how  gladly 
I  would  have  been  in  the  thickest  of  the  fight, 
to  pay  them  back  for  all  that  they  have  made  me 
suffer !" 

And  suddenly,  like  a  man  intoxicated,  as  he 
used  to  rise  in  his  stirrups  at  reviews,  saluting 
the  regimental  colors  with  his  lowered  sword, 
he  cried  with  all  his  strength  and  all  his  voice, 
so  loudly  that  he  could  be  heard  in  the  street: 
"Vive  la  France!"  Then  he  sank  into  the  arm- 
chair, exhausted  by  this  last  effort,  his  eyes  fixed 
upon  the  flags  which  waved  in  the  gathering  dark- 
ness,"and  his  face  transfigured  by  an  infinite  hap- 
piness. 

So  died,  on  the  evening  of  July  14,  in  his  eighty- 
second  year.  Colonel  Eusebe  Champlenac,  who 
had  been  decorated  upon  the  field  of  battle  at 
Austerlitz. 


ARRIVALS  AT  CASTLE  CRAG  FARM 

Recent  arrivals  at  Castle  Crag  I-'arm  include: 
Mrs.  H.  A.  Scales  and  son,  Mrs.  Cullen  F.  Welty 
and  maid.  Misses  Elenor  and  May  Welty,  San 
Francisco;  Mrs.  Carl  Beeger,  Misses  Marie  and 
Lulu  Beeger,  Redwood  City;  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Page, 
Miss  Laura  Page,  Los  Angeles;  C.  A.  and  Mrs. 
Knight.  A.  L.  Noyes,  Medford,  Oregon;  G.  L. 
Blair,  San  Francisco;  Prof.  C.  M.  Gayley,  Berk- 
eley; W.  D.  Ford,  Oakland;  Misses  Rosa  G.  and 
M.  A.  Taussig,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  G.  A.  Ziel,  John  G. 
and  Charlotte  Ziel,  Misses  Nellie  and  Blanche  L. 
Rowden,  Miss  May  Collins,  J.  A.  Levensalor,  San 
Francisco;  Mrs.  H.  K.  Defendorf,  Oakland;  L.  E. 
Burton,  Alameda;  J.  A.  Wertner,  Miss  Ruther- 
ford, Mrs.  C.  Bcrtheau,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Geo.  E. 
Volkmann,  Mrs.  A.  H.  R.  Schmidt,  Mrs.  J.  H. 
Stockwell  and  Master  Roland,  Miss  Rcttie  Ilor- 
tenstinc,  San  Francisco. 


Citizens*    Alliance    of    San  Francisco 

OPEN  SHOP 

I  11  ion  ism  has  nothing  in  common 
with  democracy  or  socialism.  Uiiion- 
ism  is  Autocracy,  begotten  by  Poli- 
tics and  Intolerance  and  its  name  is 
Monopoly. 

The  Citizens  Alliances'  offices  arc 
in  the  Russ  BIdg.,  Nos.  363-364-365, 
San  Francisco,  Cal.  The  Free  Regis- 
tration Bureau  for  labor  of  all  kinds  is 
located  here,  and  open  to  all. 


22 


TOWN  TALK 


July  20,  1912 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,026; 
Department  No.  10.  „  ,  , 

LUCILE  V.  L.'^RM,  Plaintiff,  vs.  G.  LARM,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County.  ^     ,  - 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California,  Send  Greeting  to : 
G.  Larm,  Defendant.  .  ■      u  u 

You  are  hereby  Required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  I'rancisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  Summons,  if  served 
within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere  within 
thirty   days.  .  , 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and 
decree  of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony 
now  existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  Wilful  Desertion  and  Habitual  Intemperance; 
also  for  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in  the 
Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby  made. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  'as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take  judg- 
ment fur  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the  Com- 
plaint as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court 
for  any  other  relief  demanded  in  the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  27th  day  of  April    A    D  1912 

(Sean  H.  I.  MI  LCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH.  Deputy  Clerk. 
McGOWAN  and  WESTLAKE,  Attys.  for  Plaintiff, 

Humboldt  Bank  Bide..  San  Francisco.  Cal.  f,-i  \0 

The  Return 

.'\  little  hand  is  knocking  at  my  luart, 
.\n<l  1  have  closed  the  door, 
"i  pray  thee,  for  the  love  of  God,  depart; 
Tliou  shalt  conic  in  no  more." 

"Open,  for  I  am  weary  of  the  way. 
The  night  is  very  black. 

I  have  been  wandering  many  a  night  and  day. 
Open.    I  have  come  back." 

The  little  hand  is  knocking  patiently; 
I  listen,  dumb  with  pain: — 
"Wilt  tlii'n  iiMt  open  ;iny  more  to  me? 
1  have  come  back  again." 

"I  will  not  open  any  more.  Depart. 
1.  that  once  lived,  am  dead." 

The  hand  that  had  been  knocl  ing  at  my  liL'art 
Was  still.    ".Vud  I?"  she  said. 

There  is  no  sound,  save,  in  the  winter  a>. 
The  sound  of  wind  and  rain. 
.Ml  that  I  loved  in  all  the  world  s'.ands  there, 
.\nd  will  not  knock  again. 

— Arthur  Symons. 


Lovely  Woman 

Her  waist  begins  just  below  her  neck.  Her 
hips  have  been  planed  off  even  with  the  rest  of 
her  body.  She  is  usually  buttoned  up  the  back, 
and  around  her  neck  she  wears  a  section:  of  barbed 
wire,  covered  with  lace.  She  wears  on  her  head 
a  blond  haystack  of  hair,  and  on  top  of  this  a 
central  dome  with  rings  about  the  same  size  as 
those  of  Saturn.  She  is  swathed  in  her  gown  like 
an  Indian  papoose,  and  on  the  end  of  her  feet  are 
dabs  of  patent  leather.  She  walks  on  stiltlike 
heels  with  the  expcrtness  of  a  tight-rope  dancer. 
The  pores  of  her  skin  are  full  of  fine  white 
powder. 

This  is  a  woman. 


All  Kinds 


"Football!"  growled  the  angry  father.  "Ugh!" 
"But  surely,"  said  his  friend,  "your  son  won 
high  honors  in  football  at  his  college?" 
"He  did,"  assented  the  father. 
"First  he  was  a  quarter  back — " 
"Yes." 

"Then  a  halfback — " 
"Yes." 

"Then  a  fullback — " 
"Yes." 

"And  now — what  is  he  now?" 

"Now,"  roared  the  father,  "he  is  a  hunchback!" 


ORDER   TO    SHOW    CAUSE   WHY    SALE   OF  REAL 
REAL  ESTATE  SHOULD  NOT  BE  MADE 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
lor  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — >Jo.  12,43ii; 
Uepartment  No.  10. 
In    the    Matter   of   the   Estate   of   MAJOR  CONWAY, 

Deceased. 

Annie  Conway,  the  Administratrix  of  the  estate  of  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  having  tiled  in  this  Court  her  petition 
lor  an  order  to  sell  the  real  estate  of  said  decedent  tor 
the  purposes  therein  set  forth,  and  it  appearing  Irom  said 
petition  that  It  IS  necessary  to  sell  the  whole  or  some  por- 
iiuti  ot  said  real  estate,  and  good  cause  appearing  there- 
for, 

isow  therefore,  it  is  hereby  ordered,  adjudged  and  decreed 
that  all  persons  interested  in  the  said  estate  of  said  Major 
Conway,  aeceasea,  be  and  appear  betore  the  above  en- 
titled Court,  Department  No.  10  thereot,  on  V\  ednesday, 
tne  Jlst  clay  ol  July,  iyi2,  at  10  o'clock  a.  m.  ol  said  day, 
at  the  Courtroom  of  said  Court,  Koom  No.  519,  in  the 
temporary  City  Hall  on  Market  Street  near  Eighth  street, 
in  tiie  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
lurnia,  then  and  there  to  show  cause  why  an  order  should 
not  be  granted  to  the  said  Administratrix  to  sell  the  whole 
or  some  portion  of  the  real  estate  ot  said  deceased. 

it  IS  further  ordered  that  a  copy  of  said  order  be  pub- 
lished for  at  least  tour  successive  weeks  in  *'Town  Talk, 
a   newspaper  printed   and  published  in  the  said  City  and 
County  ol  San  I'rancisco. 

uoiie  in  open  Court  this  21st  day  of  June,  1912. 

tSigned;        THUMAS  F.  GRAHAM, 

Judge. 

HLGH  K.  McKEVITT,  Atty.  for  Administratrix, 

Jtlearst  lildg.,  San  1-rancisco,  Cal.  6-29-5 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  43,036; 
Department  No.  10. 

LUL  ETTA  WILMUTH,  Plaintiff,  vs.  HOWARD 
WELLINGTON  WILMUTH,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
Calitornia,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  F'ran- 
cisco,  and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Howard   \\  ellington   \\  ilmoth.  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  I'laintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  ot  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
hied  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service;  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons,  if 
served  within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere 
within    thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and  de- 
cree of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony  now 
existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  wilHul  desertion  and  willful  neglect  of  plain- 
tiff ;  also  for  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in 
the  Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby 
made. 

."Xnd  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear 
and  answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the 
Complaint  as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the 
Court   for  any  other  relief  demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  26th  day  of  June,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MULCREVY.  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH,  Deputy  Clerk. 
M.   M.  GETZ,  ROBINSON  &  GETZ,  Atty.  for  Plaintiff, 
45  Kearny  St.,  San  F'rancisco,  Cal.  6-29-10 

NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 
Estate  of  LIPPMANN  S.\CIIS,  Deceased— No.  16,663, 
N.  S. ;  Department  No.  10. 
Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  undersigned,  Mary  Sachs 
and  Albert  Baruch,  Executors  of  the  Last  Will  and  Testa- 
ment of  Lijipmann  Sachs,  deceased,  to  the  creditors  of  and 
all  persons  having  claims  against  the  said  deceased,  to  ex- 
hibit them  with  the  necessary  vouchers  within  ten  (10) 
months  after  the  first  publication  of  this  notice  to  the  said 
Executors  at  the  office  of  Heller,  Powers  &  Ehrman,  Room 
713  Nevada  Bank  Building,  So.  14  Montgomery  Street, 
San  Francisco,  California,  which  said  office  the  undersigned 
select  as  their  place  of  business  in  all  matters  connected  with 
the  said  estate  of  Lippmann  Sachs,  deceased. 

MARY  SACHS, 
ALBERT  BARCCH, 
Executors  of  the   Last   Will   and  Testament  of  Lippmann 
Sachs,  Deceased. 
Dated:   July    13,  1912. 
HELLER,  POWERS  &  EHRMAN, 
-Attorneys  for  Executors, 

Nevada  Bank  Bldg.,  San  Francisco.  7-13-5 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  ot  Calitornia,  in  and  fo, 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco— No.  42,177 ; 
Department  No.  10. 

CLARA  JESSURUN,  Plaintiff,  vs.  WALTER  S.  JES- 
SURUN,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Walter  S.  Jessurun,  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  directed  to  appear  and  answer  the  com- 
plaint in  an  action  entitled  as  above  brought  against  you 
in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  within  ten  days 
after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons — if  served  within 
this  City  and  County;  or  within  thirty  days  if  served  else- 
where. 

.•\nd  you  are  hereby  notified  that  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  money  or  damages  in  the  complaint  as 
arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court  for  any 
other  relief  demanded  in  the  complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
at  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, this  7th  day  of  May,  A.  D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MULCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  H.  I.  PORTER,  Deputy  Clerk. 
HENRY  ACH,   Atty.   for  Plaintiff, 

Rooms  316-320   Balboa   Building,   Southeast   Corner  ot 
Market  and  Second  Sts.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  5-18-10 


Phones,   Pacific   Douglas  4113;   Home  C2519 
Typewriters  Rented  and  Inspected 

WALTER  J.  WOLF 

Rebuilt  Typewriters 
Expert  Repairing 

SUPPLIES  FOR  ALL  MAKES  OF  MACHINES 
CARBON    PAPERS   AND   OFFICE  SUPPLIES 

307  Bush  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


VALUABLE  INFORMATION 

Of  a  Business,  Personal  or  Social  Nature 
from  the  Press  of  the  Pacific  Coast 

DAKES'  PRESS  CLIPPING  BUREAU 

12  GEARY  STREET,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phones,  Kearny  1440  and  Home  C  1470 

432  S.  MAIN  STREET,  LOS  ANGELES 

Phones,  F  1289  and  Main  4133 

Clippings  Served  from  Sc  to  SS  per  Month 
C5rder  Now.    Stop  When  You  Please 
Pay  for  What  You  Get 


Office  Phone.  Kearny  57     Residence  I'hone.  .Market  4863 

DR.  A.  H.  WRIGHT 


1  to  4  and  7  to  8 


CHRONICLE  BLDG. 


KNIGHT  &.  HEGGERTY 

Attorneys  at  Law  and  Proctors  in  Admiralty 
CROCKER    BUILDING  Rooms  807-810 

Telephone  Kearny  4  145 


HENRY  P.  TRICOU 

NOTARY  PUBLIC 
508  CALIFORNIA  ST.  Phone  Kearny  371 

Residence,  882  Grove  St.    Phone  Park  1870 


NEWSPAPER  ART  LEAGUE 

Commercial  Art  and  Commercial 
Photography  of  All  Kinds 

Speculative  Drawings  and  Bids  Submitted  upon  Request 

185  STEVENSON  STREET 

ROOMS  306-308  Phone   Sutter  I02'< 


5%  Per  Month 

SAVED  on  the  Investment  by  Buying 

THE 

ALASKA  REFRIGERATOR 

900.000  SOLD  SINCE  1878 
We    have    a    Test    Refrigerator    to    prove    what  we 
claim  for  it.    Please  call   and  see  it. 

Pacific  Coast  Agents 

W.  W.  MONTAGUE  &  CO. 

557-563  MARKET  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


Patrick  &  Company 

RUBBER  STAMPS 
Stencils,  Seals,  Signs,  Etc. 


560  Market  Street 


San  Franciscc 


July  20,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


23 


Letters 


A  Novel  by  Vaughan  Kester 

When  Vaughan  Kester  died  within  a  few  days 
of  the  publication  of  "The  Prodigal  Judge"  he 
left  the  completed  manuscript  of  another  novel 
which  had  been  written  before  the  last  published 
book  and  laid  aside  for  final  revision.  Therefore, 
"The  Just  and  the  Unjust"  is  not  to  be  classed 
with  that  large  volume  of  posthumous  work 
which  represents  the  discarded  fragments  hastily 
gathered  by  thrifty  relatives  after  the  author  is 
beyond  power  of  protest.  Vaughan  Kester  was 
always  a  careful  workman  and  never  afraid  to 
take  as  large  a  canvas  as  he  thought  his  picture 
would  require,  and  there  is  no  stint  of  character 
or  background  in  "The  Just  and  the  Unjust." 
The  scenes  are  laid  in  an  Ohio  community  and 
though  no  definite  date  is  set  the  time  is  evidentl}- 
within  the  last  half  of  the  nineteenth  century. 
The  situations  are  tense  and  dramatic,  involving 
a  trial  for  murder  in  which  the  evidence  is  mainly 
circumstantial  but  helped  out  by  judicious  per- 
jury. The  accused  cannot  clear  himself  because 
to  establish  an  alibi  at  the  hour  when  the  crime 
was  perpetrated  he  would  be  obliged  to  subpoena 
the  wife  of  a  friend  with  whom  he  had  been 
carrying  on  an  intrigue  and  besides  involving  her 
in  a  scandal  he  would  reveal  the  unsavory  episode 
to  the  girl  whom  he  loved  and  hoped  to  marry. 
Mrs.  Langham  will  say  nothing  because  to  come 
forward  with  her  testimony  would  not  only  place 
her  in  an  unpleasant  predicament  but  also  be- 
cause she  had  stumbled  upon  the  fact  that  her 
husband  was  the  guilty  one.  The  judge  who 
presided  at  the  trial  of  an  innocent  man  and  saw 
him  convicted  and  sentenced  to  be  hanged  knew 
that  his  own  son  should  have  been  arraigned  and 
public  opinion,  with  few  exceptions,  followed  the 
line  of  least  resistance.  There  were  just  six  per- 
sons who  knew  positively  that  John  North  was 
not  guilty.  These  were  himself,  tongue-tied  by 
consideration  of  a  woman's  reputation  and  con- 
vinced that  justice  could  not  go  astray;  Judge 
Langham,  his  son  Marshall  who,  unknown  to  the 
community  at  large,  was  in  desperate  need  of 
money,  and  who,  besides  the  consideration  of  his 
own  neck,  had  a  bitter  enmity  for  North  on 
account  of  the  intrigue  he  had  discovered;  Mrs. 
Langham  who  had  her  own  reputation  and  her 
hus  band's  life  at  stake;  Andy  Gilmore,  the 
gambler  with  a  spite  against  North  and  a  desire 
for  a  hold  over  the  younger  Langham;  and  Joe 
Montgomery,  an  idle,  half-criminal  ne'er-do-well 
who,  though  he  did  not  witness  the  murder,  was 
in  the  vicinity  and  saw  Langham  make  his  escape 
from  the  premises.  Montgomery,  half  frightened, 
half  coaxed  into  jerjury,  had  not  brains  enough 
to  understand  the  magnitude  of  his  ofifense  and 
after  having  been  spirited  away,  it  was  supposed 
for  good  and  all,  it  was  his  inopportune  return 
and  the  further  attempt  of  Langham  to  silence 
him  which  led  to  disclosures  long  after  the 
eleventh  hour  had  struck  and  too  late  to  save 
Judge  Langham  who  committed  suicide  on  the 
night  before  John  North  was  to  be  hanged.  As 


a  relief  to  the  strain  of  the  apprehension  and  trial 
of  North  we  turn  to  Shrimplin,  the  mild  and 
meager  little  lamp-lighter,  timid  and  shrinking 
to  a  degree,  yet  with  such  an  admiration  of 
courage  and  prowess  that  he  has  managed  to 
transform  himself,  in  the  eyes  of  his  fourteen- 
year-old  son,  into  a  typical  bad  man  of  the  West. 
An  omniverous  devourer  of  dime  novels,  "Shrimp" 
commits  homicides  by  the  score,  defies  law  officers 
and  "busts"  bronchos  to  the  credulous  delight 
ni  the  youngster  who  never  once  doubts  the 
truth  of  the  yarning,  nor  suspects  that  the  myster- 
ious strangers  met  in  dark  alleys  on  the  lamp- 
lighting  tours  exist  only  in  the  parental  imagina- 
tion and  that  all  the  time  the  mild-mannered, 
blue-eyed,  blonde-mustached  hero  is  scared  of  his 
own  shadow.  Singularly  enough,  the  boy,  intent 
on  living  up  to  the  high  standard,  does  really 
develop  a  fair  degree  of  practical  courage  and 
acquits  himself  creditably  when  the  demand  is 
made.  Vaughan  Kester  seems  to  have  been  at 
home  in  the  midwest  in  its  transition  days  and 
this  is  not  the  first  time  that  we  have  visited  it 
under  his  guidance.  Though  unusual,  there  is 
nothing  strained  or  improbable  about  "The  Just 
and  the  Unjust."  There  is  no  padding  and  not  a 
dull  passage  in  the  four  hundred  pages.  It  is 
probably  the  last  time  the  author's  name  will 
appear  in  a  publisher's  catalogue  unless  for  a 
reissue  of  some  earlier  work,  and  emphasizes  the 
loss  we  have  sustained  in  the  capable  writer  who 
has  done  so  much  towards  preserving  pictures 
of  our  frontier  States  between  the  period  of  first 
settlements  and  final  crystallization.  From  Bobbs- 
Merrill. 


"The  Melting  of  Molly" 

"The  Melting  of  Molly"  was  no  figure  of  speech, 
for  ALaria  Thompson  Daviess's  heroine  was  a  be- 
witching young  Tennessee  widow  who  was  be- 
ginning to  take  notice  again.  In  her  girlhood 
she  had  been  quite  becoming,  in  love  and  beloved 
by  the  ideal  youth  who,  alas,  had  not  the  where- 
withal to  support  her  "-harms.  There  was  no 
positive  engagement  between  them,  but  when 
Alfred  went  away  it  was  with  the  understandin.g 
that  on  his  return  Molly  would  still  be  Molly 
in  the  same  enchanting  blue  muslin  frock.  Molly, 
however,  had  an  abundance  of  worldly-wise  rel- 
atives who  married  her  off  to  a  rich  old  fellow 
because  it  would  be  "so  safe,"  v/ithout  much 
consideration  of  other  fitness.  Now  Mr.  Carter 
had  been  dead  for  the  traditional  years  demanded 
by  old  fashioned  conservatism,  Alfred  Bennett 
was  coming  back  in  three  "months,  and  Molly's 
heart  was  all  aflutter  with  joyous  anticipation, 
but  the  sylphlike  maiden  of  eighteen  was  a  de- 
cidedly plump,  if  not  absolutely  fat  matron  of 
twenty-five,  with  the  carefully  preserved  blue 
muslin  not  even  a  snug  fit.  There  were  thirty 
pounds  of  superfluous  flesh  to  be  got  rid  of,  and 
poor  Molly  did  love  good  things  to  eat.  Her 
ever  present  help  in  trouble  was  her  next  door 
neighbor,  a  young  doctor,  a  widower  with  one 
little  son  whom  Molly  mothered.  Dr.  Moore 
prescribed  a  heroic  course  of  rigid  diet,  exercise 


DO  YOUR  EYES  TROUBLE  YOU? 

If  so  consult  George  Mayerle,  the  German  Optical  Expert,  whose  professional  services 
nave  been  appreciated  and  acknowledged  by  most  eminent  men. 

Mayerle's  German  Eye-Water,  the  greatest  eye  tonic  in  the  world,  at  reliable  druggists, 
5()c,  or  by  mail  from  San  Francisco,  65c. 

VVhen  your  eye-glasses  or  spectacles  blur  or  tire  the  eyes,  wipe  them  with  Mayerle's  An- 
tiseptic eye-glass  cleaner.  This  is  a  specially  prepared  chemical  cloth  for  polishing  lenses, 
opera,  field  and  marine  glasses. 

It  removes  all  stains  and  blemishes  immediately  without  sw.atching.    By  mail,  3  for  25c. 

Establuhed  18  Years 


George  Mayerle 


Always  look  for  the  nam*,  Mayerle 

GERMAN  OPTICAL  INSTITUTE 
960  MARKET  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 


and  baths  warranted  to  reduce  the  "peach"  to  a 
"string  bean"  if  followed  up,  and  the  whimsical 
account  of  her  sufTerings  recorded  in  a  sort  of 
go-as-you-please  journal  would  be  warranted  to 
put  flesh  on  a  skeleton  as  a  laugh-and-grow-fat 
prescription.  It  is  not  to  be  assumed  that  Molly 
Carter  had  only  one  lover  and  that  all  her  efTorts 
were  confined  to  accommodating  herself  to  his 
standards.  On  the  contrary,  it  was  about  all  she 
could  manage  to  fend  off  half  a  dozen  more,  each 
of  whom  had  reasonable  hopes,  nor  was  she 
herself  irrevocably  committed  to  the  absent  Al- 
fred Bennett.  There  was  Cousin  Tom  Pollard 
who  had  all  the  cousinly  privileges  and  assumed 
a  few  more;  and  Judge  Wade,  decidedly  the  lead- 
ing man  of  the  community,  with  his  perfect  man- 
ners, high  professional  standing  and  fine  char- 
acter, and  there  was  Dr.  Moore  who  kept  him- 
self in  the  background  and  wisely  or  innocently 
let  little  Billy  do  all  the  courting,  so  it  is  ob- 
vious that  the  gossipy  little  village  of  Harpeth 
was  never  in  lack  of  a  topic  for  discussion.  It 
is  a  friendly  community  where  everyone  knows 
everybody,  and  there  is  a  flavor  of  old-time  and 
almost  forgotten  neighborliness  in  the  matter 
of  course  contributions  of  all  the  notable  house- 
wives when  there  is  a  dinner  to  be  served  or  an 
entertainment  planned.  It  is  a  delicious  bit  of 
comedy,  as  light  as  whipped  cream,  with  just  one 
touch  of  tragedy — when  the  long  expected  and 
eagerly  anticipated  absentee  for  whom,  at  least 
in  theory,  the  widow  Molly  Carter  has  been 
literally  melting  herself,  returns  and  behold,  he 
is  fat.  "It  took  two  good  looks  to  take  him  all 
in  and  then  I  must  have  missed  some  of  him, 
for  all  in  all  he  was  so  large  that  he  stretched 
your  eyes  to  behold  him.  He's  grow  seven  feet 
tall  and  I  don't  know  how  many  poimds  he 
weighs,  and  I  don't  want  anybody  ever  to  tell 
me."  Molly  fled  from  the  sight,  fled  for  protec- 
tion and  by  instinct  to- — well,  read  the  book  and 
find  out.  This  is  a  "little  book,"  only  two  hun- 
dred pages,  but  there  is  nothing  to  skip.  From 
Bobbs-Merrill. 


Customer — How  long  have  you  waited  at  this 
table? 

Waiter — Seven  years,  sir. 

Customer — .Ml,  even  longer  than  I  have. 


Town  Talk  Press 

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finest  train 


On  the  return  trip  the  Saint  offers 
the  same  superior  service. 

Phone  or  call  on  me  for  reservations. 

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cisco.   Phone:  Kearny  315  and  J  3371. 

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your  friends  or  neighbors.  Tell  us.  it's  the  only  fair  and  satisfactory 
manner  of  getting  the  difficulty  adjusted. 

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earnestly  request  them  to  report  the  matter  to  us  at  once.  By  doing  this 
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We  want  you  to  find  "Pacific  Service"  to  be  what  we  are  striving  to 
make  it — a  service  that  is  prompt,  courteous  and  as  nearly  perfect  as  possible. 

"Pacific  Service"  is  "Perfect  Service" 

PACIFIC  GAS  & 
ELECTRIC  Co. 

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Leading'  Hotels  and  Resorts 


OP' 


IN  THE  GOOD  OLD  SUMMER  TIME 

we  want  you  at 

Hotel  Del  Monte  or  Pacific  Grove  Hotel 

where  we  have  the  most  g^lorious  chmate  on  the  coast;  never  a  hot 
day.  Here  you  can  Golf,  Motor,  Ride,  Swim,  and  Fish  v\ith  perfect 
comfort. 

OUR  GOLF  COURSE 

is  now  pronounced  the  best  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  and  equal  to  any  in 
the  Eastern  States.     Write  for  rates  and  literature  to 

H.  R.  WARNER,  Del  Monte,  California 


CORONADO  BEACI^TALl>rORNIA 


^.itets^   , 

A CHOICE  retreat  away  from  the  intense  heat 
of  summer.  Goliing,  tennis,  motoring,  bay 
and  surf  bathing  and  evc:ry  other  imaginable  out- 
of-door  diversion  to  be  enjoyed  here.  Only  a 
few  minutes  ride  across  the  bay  from  San  Diego. 
Summer  Kates. 

H.  W.  Wills,  Maoager,  Coiooiido,  Cal.  or 
H.  F.  Norcroii,  A  j  .  331  So.  Sprins  St..  Los  Ai  g  I.  s,  faL 


CLIFF  HOUSE 

SAN    FRANCISCO'S    MOST    FAMOUS  RESORT 

Unsurpassed  Cuisine 

(a    la    carte  service) 

Dancing  in  Ball  Room  Every  Evening 
Private  Banquet  and  Dining  Rooms 
Friday  Fish  Dinner 

(tal)le  d'hote) 

Vocal  and  Instrumental  Entertainment 


PARAISO 

HOT  SPRINGS 

Grandest   and   Most  Accessible. 
California's  Real  Paradise 

(Inly  four  hours  from  San  Francisco.  Wonderful 
natural  hot  soda  and  sulphur;  guaranteed  for 
rheumatism,  liver,  kidney  and  malaria,  all  stomach 
troubles.  Expert  masseurs.  Rates  $12  to  $16,  in- 
cluding baths.  Round  trip,  $6.35,  including  auto. 
Autos  running  daily.  Leave  Third  and  Townsend 
7  a.  m.  and  4  p.  m.  Booklets  Peck-Judah,  687 
Market  street. 

H.  H.  McGOWAN.  Proprietor  and  Manager, 
Paraiso  Springs.  Monterey  County 


CASA  DEL  REY 


New  3(X)-room,  fire-proof  hotel 
located  near  the  beach 
and  Casino. 


OPEN  ALL  YEAR  ROUND 
AMERICAN  PLAN 


Tennis  Courts,  Good  Boating^, 
BathiniTand  lushing.  Numer- 
ous drives  along  the  Ccast 
and  through   the  Mountains. 

SUPERIOR  COLFI \G 


Santa  Cruz  Beach  Hotel  Co. 


CASTLE  CRAGS  FARM 

NEAR  MT.  SHASTA 

California's  Most  Delightful  Mountain 
Resort 

Real  pine  log  cabins,  with  great  stone 
lircplaccs;  hot  and  cold  shower  baths;  elec- 
tric lights;  fine  table  with  home  cooking 


HOTEL  VICTORIA 

COR.  BUSH  AND  STOCKTON  STS. 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

.\  downtown  residence  hotel  of  the  high- 
est order,  appealing  particularly  to  those 
who  value  comfort  and  convenience  inore 
th.in  mere  ostentation  and  who  appreciate 
e.xccllence  of  cuisine  and  service  at  mod- 
erate expense. 

American  Plan,  from  $3.00  per  day  up 
European  Plan,  from  $1.50  per  day  up 

For  rat<'S  ami  rcsrr\ annus  addr.  ss 

MRS.  W.  F.  MORRIS 

Proprietor 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


HOTEL  ST.  FRANCIS 


Turkish  Baths 

12th  Floor 
Ladies  Hair  Dressing  Parlors 

2d  Floor 
Cafe 

White  and  Gold  Restaurant 

Lobby  Floor 
Electric  Grill 
Barber  Shop 

Basement,  Geary  St.  entrance 
Under  the  Management  of  James  Woods 


PALACE  HOTEL 

Situated  on  Market  Street 
In  the  Center  of  the  City 

ake  .-Xiiy  Marl  et  Strict  Car  fr.nii  the  rcrr\ 

FAIRMONT  HOTEL 

rile  .M(ivt  lUaiitifnlly  Situated  of  .\ny  Cit\ 
11.  ti.1  in  the  World 

•  ike  Sacramento  Street  Cars  from  the  Ferr\ 

TWO  GREAT  HOTF.LS 
LNDF.R  TFJE  MA.VAGFMF.NT  OF  THE 
PALACE   HOTEL  COMPANY 


Hotel  Rowardennan 


BEN  LOMOND.  CAL. 


In  the  Mountains  by  the  Sea 
Open  Ail  Year  Round 
Under   New  Management 
Rates  $17.50  to  $25.00  per  Week 
Excellent  Cuisine  and  Service 
.Automobile    parties    will    find    this    resort    a  go 
place   to    stop    at.     Fishing    season    now    open.  F 
inform.'ition  and  booklet,  address. 

J.  M.  SHOULTS 

Ben   Lomond,  Cal. 
Or  the  Peck-Judah  Co.,  San  Francisco. 


Golf,  Bathe  and  Rest  at 

Paso  Robles  Hot  Springs 

Five  Hours  from  San  Francisco 


WILLOW  RANCH 

UranVOOn  HFIGIITS— Grandest  view  of  the 
Santa  Cruz  Mountains;  overlooking  ocean  and  beach 
Delightfully  located  in  the  Redwoods,  5  miles  from 
Santa  Cruz.  Spring  water.  Fxcellent  table,  bath 
houses,  swimming  pool,  dance  pavilion,  hunting  and 
fishing.  Splendid  auto  service  free.  Daily  mail. 
Phone  Santa  Cruz  8  J  13.    $8.00  per  week. 

MRS.   M.  J.  CRANDELL, 
Santa  Cruz.  Cal. 


GILROY  HOT  SPRINGS 

SANTA  CLARA  CO. 

.Most  favorably  noted  for  its  health-healing  waters, 
ideal  climate,  grand  mountain  scenery  and  firsl-class 
table. 

Only    four   hours   from    San    Francisco,  including 
delightful  stage  ride  over  the  best  ke,>t  mountain  road 
in  California.    Hunting  and  trout  fishing.    Send  for 
booklet   or  see   I^eck-Jndah.   687   Market  street. 
W.  J.  McDonald.  Proprietor 


TOWN  TALK 

THE   PACIFIC  WEEKLY 


Vi,l.  XX. 


Published  Weekly  by 
PACIFIC  PUBLICATION  COMPANY  (Inc.) 
88  First  Street,  San  Francisco 
Phone  Douglas  2612 

Theodore    F.    Bonnet  Editor 

Chas.  W.  Raymond  Business  Manager 


SUBSCRIPTION— One  year,  in  advance,  $4.00;  six 
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per  year.    For  sjtle  by  all  Newsdealers. 

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The  trade  supplied  direct  by  us. 

For  foreign  and  local  advertising  rates  address  88  First 
street,  San  Francisco. 

New  York  office,  37-39  East  Twenty-eighth  street.  Frederic 
M.  Krugler,  representative. 

Los   Angeles   office,   432    South    Main  street. 

We  decline  to  return  or  to  enter  into  correspondence  as 
to  rejected  communications;  and  to  this  rule  we  can  make 
no  exception.  Manuscripts  not  acknowledged  within  four 
weeks  are  rejected. 


A  Tired  Kansan 

According  to  the  New  York  World  E.  W. 
Howe,  an  editor  of  Atchison,  Kan.,  is  the 
wickedest  man  in  the  world,  the  reason  be- 
ing that  he  is  "tired  of  Francis  J.  Heney 
and  his  tale  about  Abe  Ruef."  This  confes- 
sion without  profession  of  repentance  the 
World  considers  to  be  proof  of  sin  and  de- 
pravity, since  "to  be  tired  of  Heney  is  to 
be  tired  of  purity  and  goodness  and  virtue 
and  consecration.  It  is  to  be  tired  of  Roose- 
velt. It  is  to  be  tired  of  the  Ten  Command- 
ments and  Dr.  Lyman  Abbott."  Finally, 
the  World  says :  "The  man  who  would  still 
the  voice  of  Heney  and  stifle  the  story  of 
Abe  Ruef  would  muzzle  the  celestial  choir." 
Fancy  a  Kansas  editor  revolting  at  the 
righteousness  of  Heney!  Kansas  is  Gov- 
ernor Stubbs's  State.  Kansas  is  full  of  civic 
patriots  and  reformers.  Yet,  judging  from 
the  impatience  of  Editor  Howe,  none  of  his 
fellow  citizens  is  in  Heney's  class.  And 
Heney  is  not  among  the  top-notchers  of 
holiness  in  unregenerate  California.  Now, 
if  Mr.  Heney  gives  Editor  Howe  that 
tired  feeling  what  would  be  the  effect  on  the 
Kansas  journalist  of  a  sojourn  in  this  State 
reeking  as  it  is  with  the  righteousness  of 
such  noble  and  invincible  enemies  of  wick- 
edness as  Governor  Johnson,  Chester  Row- 
ell,  R.  A.  Crothers,  Dr.  Taylor,  Billy  Kent, 
Meyer  Lissncr,  Colonel  Weinstock  and 
others  too  numerous  too  mention?  Cali- 
fornia, which  justly  claims  precedence  over 
all  other  States  for  the  variety  of  her 
products,  is  pre-eminent  in  the  number  and 
intensity  of  her  pests  on  two  legs,  and  the 
wild  ass  of  the  desert  is  by  no  means  entitled 
to  rank  with  the  foremost.  For  producing 
languor  his  bray  ma}^  be  potent  in  foreign 
parts,  but  here  at  home  it  wakes  neither  to 
ecstasy  nor  to  sorrow.  Here,  where  all  the 
orbs  of  reform  are  shedding  their  translucent 
beams  into  the  warrens  of  wickedness  the 
Heney  rush-light  is  not  to  be  seen.  So  doth 
the  greater  glory  dim  the  less. 


San  Francisco,  July  27,  1912 


Works  and  the  Progressives 

It  was  a  little  unreasonable  for  our  im- 
petuous Progressives  to  call  upon  Senator 
Works  to  resign  his  high  ofifice.  And  as  the 
outcome  proves  it  was  also  somewhat  rash. 
It  was  unreasonable  because  there  is  no 
ethical  principle  on  which  a  thief  may  de- 
mand the  return  of  stolen  goods  from  the 
receiver  thereof.  The  people  alone  have  au- 
thority in  the  matter,  and  unfortunately 
they  have  provided  no  method  of  compell- 
ing the  receiver  to  disgorge  in  a  case  of 
this  kind.  Senator  Works  is  privileged  to 
hold  his  stolen  seat  till  the  end  of  his  term. 
Furthermore,  were  he  to  return  it  to  Gov- 
ernor Johnson  he  would  be  an  accessory 
after  a  fashion  to  the  compounding  of  a 
felony.  Now  as  to  the  rashness  of  the  un- 
reasonable request.  Our  fatuous  Progres- 
sives bared  their  backs  for  a  clawing,  and 
Senator  Works  is  a  bear  when  roused. 
There  is  no  escape  from  the  logic  of  his  ar- 
gument on  the  immorality  of  the  Progres- 
sive program  in  California.  "They  cannot," 
as  Senator  Works  says  of  Governor  John- 
son and  his  followers,  "belong  to  two  polit- 
ical parties  at  the  sanie  time,  or  use  their 
official  positions  in  the  Republican  party  to 
further  the  interests  of  a  candidate  of  an- 
other party,  new  or  old."  Moreover,  as  Sen- 
ator Works  points  out,  "A  candidate  for 
the  legislature  must  make  oath  that  he  is 
a  Republican  and  will  vote  for  a  majority 
of  the  candidates  of  that  party,"  and  if  legis- 
lative candidates  take  their  oatlV  with  "a 
mental  reservation"  intending  to  nominate 
electors  "who  belong  to  a  new  party  or  who 
will  vote  for  the  candidate  of  a  new  party 
their  conduct  will  be  wholly  indefensible." 
Senator  Works  assumes  with  shrewd  satire 
that  the  Progressives  of  California  would  do 
nothing  so  dishonorable,  though  well  he 
knows  that  the  course  he  condemns  is  pre- 
cisely the  course  which  they  purpose  to  pur- 
sue. It  is  precisely  the  course  which  they 
have  brazenly  outlined  for  themselves.  And 
it  is  precisely  the  course  the  great  moralist 
T.  R.  expects  them  to  take.  So  it  is  evi- 
dent that  the  Progressives,  forgetting  the 
old  proverb  that  if  you  raise  a  raven  it  will 
scratch  your  eyes  out,  exposed  themselves 
rashly  to  the  blistering  satire  of  their  Sen- 
ator. He  has  made  them  ridiculous  in  the 
sight  of  men.  What  they  took  for  a  javelin 
turned  out  to  be  a  boomerang.  We  con- 
p'ratulate  our  chaste  champion  of  Christian 
Science  on  the  dexterity  with  which  he  put 
the  Pharisees  to  flight.  We  admire  his 
logic  insofar  as  it  applies  to  the  over- 
righteous  ones,  and  we  regret  that  he  is  not 
cfjually  convincing  in  his  discussion  of  the 
rights  and  duties  of  all  Republicans.  The 
.Senator's  argument  is  somewhat  hazy  on 
this  subject.    His  views  seem  irreconcilable, 


No.  1040 


reminding  us  of  his  decision  in  the  Spring 
X'allcy  Water  Works  suit  and  of  other 
decisions  which  he  dashed  off  when  he  was 
a  justice  of  the  Supreme  Court.  So  great 
was  his  ability  for  rendering  confusion 
worse  confounded  that  for  twenty  years 
after  he  was  droj^ped  from  the  bench  the 
court  was  kept  busy  straightening  out  the 
law  of  the  State. 


Jean  Jacques  Rousseau 

We  are  going  to  hear  a  great  deal  about 
Jean  Jacques  Rousseau  in  this  year  of  un- 
rest. For  this  is  the  year  of  the  second 
centennial  of  the  Father  of  the  French  Rev- 
olution, and  it  is  to  be  celebrated  not  only 
in  France  but  wherever  in  this  restless 
turbulent  world  men  and  women,  dissatis- 
fied with  the  existing  order  of  things,  are 
agitating  for  a  new  deal,  or,  like  the  losing 
gambler,  are  demanding  a  fresh  deck  of 
cards.  Rousseau's  centennial  ought  to  have 
many  celebrants.  He  was  the  great  apostle 
of  Change.  He  was  the  original  man  with 
a  grouch,  or,  at  least,  the  first  kicker  against 
the  pricks  with  ideas  worth  while  and  the 
ability  to  render  them  accessible  and  cap- 
tivating to  the  common  mind.  The  best 
way  to  celebrate  Rousseau  is  to  read  him. 
But  we  fear  he  will  not  be  read.  This  is 
the  age  of  short-cuts  to  everything  includ- 
ing knowledge.  Instead  of  getting  ac- 
quainted with  one  of  the  immortals  by  read- 
ing him  the  average  man  reads  what  some- 
body else  has  said  about  him.  Thus  is  mis- 
information disseminated  by  the  innumer- 
able hack  writers  of  England,  who  are  grind- 
ing out  "Lives,"  "Studies,"  and  "I'iographi- 
cal  Essays"  by  the  ton.  Thus  has  Rous- 
seau come  to  be  misunderstood  b}-  the 
many.  Rousseau  is  popularly  known  as  a 
writer  of  riscpie  Confessions,  lie  is  reputed 
to  have  inspired  both  Thomas  Jefferson  and 
the  French  Revolution,  and  therefore  it  is 
concluded  that  he  was  the  first  Democrat 
and  something  of  a  Jacobin  and  a  man  with 
unbounded  confidence  in  the  intelligence 
and  morality  of  the  plain  people.  Some- 
times wc  are  told  that  he  was  a  disciple  of 
Voltaire,  and  that  his  philosophy  supplied 
the  formulas  for  all  the  excesses  of  the  Rev- 
olution. It  would  be  well  were  Rousseau's 
Contrat  Social  to  become  a  best  seller  dur- 
ing the  year  of  his  centennial.  It  would  be 
well  not  only  for  us  to  become  familiar  with 
his  preachments  but  to  reflect  on  the  conse- 
(]ucnccs  of  them.  For  though  Rousseau 
was  a  great  reformer,  he  never  contem- 
plated the  kind  of  reforms  that  his  disciples 
instituted.  Great  dreamer  though  Rous- 
seau was  he  never  dreamt  that  his  dreams 
would  be  so  fruitful  of  evil  as  they  have 
proved. 


4 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


His  Influence  On  Mankind 

Let  us  correct  a  few  misapprehensions  re- 
garding Jean  Jacques.    He  was  not  a  dis- 
ciple of  Voltaire.    He  was  opposed  to  Vol- 
taire.   Voltaire   was   apprehensive   of  the 
storms  which  Rousseau's  writings  had  the 
very  natural  effect  of  raising.    Voltaire  was 
the  enemy  of  the  Church.    Rousseau  be- 
lieved in  the  efficacy  of  religion  as  a  means 
of   insuring   good   government.  Voltaire 
supported  the  existing  institutions  of  gov- 
ernment.   Rousseau     railed    against  the 
whole  temporal  fabric.    Each  exercised  a 
dissolvent  influence  of  a  distinctive  char- 
acter.   Rousseau's  was  the  more  far-reach- 
ing and  the  more  varied.    His  ideas  are 
popular  to  this  day.    His  political  ideas 
were  born  of  the  conviction  that  the  exist- 
ing" order  of  things  reduced  civilization  to  a 
nullity  for  the  great  majority  of  mankind 
who  were  wearing  their  lives  away  in  in- 
cessant toil  that  a  few  might  live.    He  be- 
lieved in  a  Utopia  in  which  all  men  would 
be  really  equal,  and  he  kindled  in  the  many 
a  hope  never  to  be  extinguished.    A  great 
visionary  and  sentimentalist  was  Rousseau, 
a  strange  combination  of  sophist  and  sound 
reasoner.    Of  course  he  was  a  Democrat 
in  the  true  sense  of  the  term,  but  he  had  no 
delusions  about  Democracy.    The  full  prac- 
tice of   Democracy,   he  said,   was  better 
suited  to  angels  than  to  men.    If  he  had 
lived  to  be  a  citizen  of  this  twentieth  cen- 
tury republic  the  Progressives  would  regard 
him  as  a  standpatter,  for  of  one  thing  Rous- 
seau was  most  assured — that  strength  is  not 
the  basis  of  authority.    Rousseau  was  a  man 
of  far-reaching  influence  not  only  in  politics, 
but  in  literature  and  art.    He  made  music 
the  fashion  in  France,  writing  about  it  with 
as  much  fervor  as  he  wrote  of  his  project 
for  perpetual  peace.    Yes,  Rousseau  was  the 
Carnegie   of   his   day.    He   was   also  an 
esthete,  and  he  roused  interest  in  interior 
decoration.    He  had  a  passion  for  manner 
in  writing,  and  formed  a  new  French  style. 
He  was  the  apostle  of  the  cult  of  nature- 
lovers,  the  first  of  rustic  ramblers  to  rouse 
general  interest  in  sermons  in  stones  and 
books  in  the  running  brooks.    When  we 
consider,  however,  the  number  of  his  dis- 
ciples who  are  glutting  the  market  with 
books  to  prove  their  superior  sympathy  with 
nature  in  her  varying  moods  we  are  not  at 
all  inclined  to  acknowledge  gratitude  to  the 
beloved   author   of   the   Confessions.  On 
the  whole  Rousseau  was  a  man  of  wonderful 
genius  and  of  many  beautiful  sentiments 
who  rendered  great  service  to  mankind.  If 
he  did  much  mischief  with  his  theories  of 
government  he  also  did  much  good. 


Steffens  At  It  Again 

Come  with  us  into  that  meadow  of  medioc- 
rity where  platitudes  pass  for  profound 
learning,  and  unctuous  egoism  for  a  divine 
mysticism,  and  sit  in  becoming  humility  at 
the  feet  of  the  little  Gamaliel  of  the  school 
of  theoretic  government — Mr.  Lincoln  Stef- 
fens. Perched  on  the  witness  stand  in  Los 
.Angeles,  a  self-satisfied  owl  in  the  midst  of 


darkness,  he  has  pity  for  the  Ijlindness  of 
the  infeiior  animals  by  whom  he  is  sur- 
rounded. 1  he  air  of  him  is  of  one  who 
might  have  invented  the  nebular  hypothesis. 
Me  is  the  picture  of  egoistic  complacency. 
Hearken  to  him,  and  you  might  suspect  that 
through  him  some  strange  spirit  dictates 
charades  for  the  mystification  of  the  be- 
nighted. He  was  in  sympathy  with  the  Mc- 
Xamaras,  he  tell  his  hearers,  because  in  con- 
versation with  them  he  learned  that  from 
experience  they  came  to  feel  that  there  was 
no  other  way  of  getting  justice.  He  did  not 
wish  to  see  them  punished  as  they  had  only 
committed  a  "revolutionary  crime";  that  is 
they  expressed  resentment  against  condi- 
tions. Besides,  believing  in  Christianity,  he 
is  not  satisfied  with  mere  justice;  he  is  in 
favor  of  "good  will,  and  understanding  and 
mercy."  The  adoring  lady  reporter  of  the 
Bulletin  tells  us  that  Mr.  Stefifens  "spoke 
carefully  and  with  infinite  patience,  as  if  he 
realized  that  these  ideas  were  new  to  the 
District  Attorney."  And  of  course  they 
were  new  to  that  painfully  sane  and  or- 
thodox individual.  To  the  lady  reporter, 
whose  brain  is  probably  a  congenial  nidus 
for  sublimated  flubdub,  Mr.  Steffens  spoke 
like  an  oracle,  only  with  less  of  equivoca- 
tion. Our  dogmatic  philosopher  disdains 
the  equivoke.  With  a  complex  web  of  con- 
tradictions for  a  creed  he  assigns  to  his 
dogmas  the  place  and  authority  of  first 
truths.  He  is  in  favor  of  more  than  jus- 
tice. He  recommends  mercy  and  good  will. 
Therefore  he  is  in  sympathy  with  the  Mc- 
Namaras  who  did  nothing  more  than  ex- 
press the  resentment  of  a  class  by  slaught- 
ering innocent  men  who  had  the  presump- 
tion to  earn  a  living.  If  in  cowardly  fashion 
the  McNamaras  made  widows  of  poor 
women  and  rendered  children  fatherless, 
why,  they  were  in  a  sense  justified  because 
they  were  personally  conducting  a  revolu- 
tion. This  is  Christianity  according  to  the 
Steffens  interpretation,  which  of  course  is 
infallible.  Also  it  is  justice  plus  mercy, 
good  will  and  understanding.  Justice  ac- 
cording to  the  Steffens'  concept  reminds  us 
of  charity  according  to  the  concept  of  an 
Englishman  whom  R.  B.  Cunninghame 
Graham  tells  us  about  in  the  preface  of  his 
book  entitled  "Charity."  This  Englishman 
was  stranded  in  Gibralter  where  he  won  the 
affections  of  a  woman  of  the  town  who  for 
many  months  fed  him  and  supplied  him  with 
money.  One  day  to  the  Englishman  came 
a  windfall  from  London.  He  packed  his 
duds  and  started  for  home.  Pacing  the 
deck  of  the  steamer  the  first  morning  out 
he  said  to  an  acquaintance :  "The  women, 
blast  them,  never  leave  a  man  alone.  I 
don't  know  if  you  saw  a  tall,  dark,  Spanish 
girl  talking  to  me  just  as  we  came  aboard. 
Well,  you  know,  don't  you  know,  I  was 
pretty  friendly  with  her  when  I  was  stuck 
in  'Gib,'  and  damn  it  all,  there  she  was  up 
on  the  mole  with  a  cow-hair  trunk,  corded 
with  bass  rope,  a  goldfinch  in  a  cage,  tears 
running  down  her  cheeks  and  bothering  me 
to  take  her  with  me.  Good  God,  a  pretty 
sight  I  should  have  looked  traveling  about. 


dra^^ging  a  Spanish  — .  I  like  her  well 
enough ;  but  what  I  say  is.  Charity  begins 
at  home,  my  boy.  Ah,  there's  the  dinner 
bell."  The  virtues  in  this  age  of  half-baked 
philosophy  are  as  defined  according  to  the 
individual  concept. 


The  Standpatters  of  Other  Days 

The  Bulletin  is  not  the  only  paper  dissat- 
isfied with  the  method  of  impeachment  pre- 
scribed by  the  Constitution  and  now  be- 
ing pursued  in  the  case  of  Judge  Archbald. 
There  are  other  theorists  who  regard  the 
method  as  too  slow,  and  who  would 
empower  the  representatives  of  the  people 
in  the  Lower  House  to  terrorize  the 
judiciary.  More  power  for  the  politicians 
fresh  from  their  constituents  is  what  our 
speed-lust  friends  of  the  Progressive  cult 
are  in  favor  of.  From  them  we  find  it 
refreshing  to  turn  to  the  slow-going 
standpatters  of  other  days.  Let  us  con- 
sult Joseph  Story  that  we  may  learn 
the  why  and  wherefore  of  the  method  of 
impeachment  established  by  the  old  fogy 
founders  of  this  ramshackle  republic.  "The 
great  objects  to  be  attained  in  the  selection 
of  a  tribunal  for  the  trial  of  impeachments," 
says  Story,  "are  impartiality,  integrity,  in- 
telligence and  independence,"  and  to  insure 
these  qualities,  "the  body  must  be,  in  some 
degree,  removed  from  popular  power  and 
passion,  from  the  influence  of  sectional 
prejudices  and  from  the  still  more  danger- 
ous influence  of  party  spirit."  It  was 
thought  in  the  old  days,  before  there  was 
any  thought  of  electing  Senators  by  direct 
vote  of  the  people,  that  the  Senate  was 
more  likely  to  possess  the  requisite  qualities 
as  a  court  of  impeachment  than  the  House 
of  Representatives  or  the  Congress.  The 
great  desideratum,  according  to  the  found- 
ers, was  the  safeguarding  of  accused  of- 
ficials from  public  clamor  which,  they  fore- 
saw, would  influence  Congressmen  elected 
by  the  people.  "Nothing  is  more  easy  in 
republics,"  says  Judge  Story,  "than  for 
demagogues,  under  artful  pretences  to  stir 
up  combinations  against  the  regular  ex- 
ercise of  authority  in  order  to  advance  their 
own  selfish  projects.  The  independence 
and  impartiality  of  upright  magistrates  often 
interpose  barriers  to  the  success  of  their 
schemes,  which  make  them  the  secret  en- 
emies of  any  regular  and  independent  ad- 
ministration of  justice."  Judge  Story 
wrote  in  1840  as  though  he  were  anticipat- 
ing the  Progressives  of  the  twentieth  cen- 
tury. 


I.VVIT.\TIONS  MONOGRAMS  CRESTS 

VISITING  CARD  Pt.ATES  ENGRAVED 


ROBERTSON 


UNION  SQUARE  SAN  FRANCISCO 


I  uiv  27.  1912  TOWNTALK  o 


Varied  Types 


In  the  seventies  there  stood  at  Twenty-second 
and  Valencia  streets,  opposite  the  Horace  Mann 
school,  a  large  unpretentious  wooden  house  sur- 
rounded by  nearly  a  block  of  straggling  unkept 
garden.  The  street  had  been  graded,  and  the 
house  and  grounds  were  elevated  five  or  six  feet 
above  the  sidewalk.  That  old  house  and  the 
garden  with  its  tangle  of  fruit  trees  and  its  un- 
tended  rose  bushes  have  long  since  disappeared. 
But  oldtimers  in  the  Mission  will  remember  the 
place  as  the  home  of  the  Klumpke  family.  Out 
of  that  old  house  the  four  Klumpke  girls  went 
to  Paris  to  make  their  mark  in  the  big  world. 

The  eldest  girl  Augusta,  now  Mrs.  Jules 
Dejerine,  became  a  great  cancer  specialist.  She 
was  the  first  woman  admitted  to  medical  prac- 
tice in  the  Paris  hospitals.  The  second  girl 
Dorothea,  now  Mrs.  Isaac  Roberts,  became  a 
famous  astronomer  and  mathematician.  She 
was  deputed  one  year  to  study  the  Leonids  for 
the  Paris  Observatory.  The  city  was  enveloped 
in  dense  fog  during  the  three  nights  when  the 
phenomena  were  looked  for,  and  she  astonished 
Paris  by  making  a  balloon  ascension  above  the 
clouds,  remaining  in  the  upper  spaces  from  mid- 
night till  eight  in  the  morning  and  obtaining  per- 
fect observations  and  photographs.  A  third  sis- 
ter Julia  made  a  name  for  herself  in  music;  she 
is  a  well-known  violinist.  The  fourth,  Anna,  is 
the  most  famous  of  all.  She  studied  art,  dis- 
tinguished herself  in  the  Salon  and  became  the 
lifelong  associate  of  the  great  Rosa  Bonheur. 
She  devoted  years  to  the  preparation  of  Rosa 
Bonheur's  biography,  and  the  book,  written  in 
French,  is  the  standard  life  of  the  animal  painter. 
When  Rosa  Bonheur  died,  Anna  Klumpke  in- 
herited her  fortune  of  several  million  francs  and 
her  famous  home  and  studio  at  By-Thomery  near 
Fontainebleau. 

Anna  Klumpke  is  now  in  San  Francisco.  She 
has  come  to  paint  the  portrait  of  her  octogenarian 
father,  John  G.  Klumpke,  before  he  dies. 

Anna  Klumpke  has  a  European  reputation  as 
a  portrait  painter.  Yet  outside  of  her  relatives 
very  few  indeed  seem  to  be  aware  that  she  is  in 
San  Francisco.  Her  family  connections  are 
large,  consisting  mostly  of  cousins.  These  are 
Mrs.  Emma  Brackett  of  Alameda,  Mrs  Sophie 
Jensen  of  Burlingame,  Mrs.  Lillie  Farnsworth, 
Mrs.  M'liss  Boothby  and  Oscar  Tolle  of  this 
city.  Miss  Klumpke  has  been  visiting  among 
them,  and  making  quiet  preparations  for  an  ex- 
hibition of  her  pictures  which  she  intends  to  give 
later. 

Miss  Klumpke  is  not  a  young  woman  in  years, 
but  devotion  to  art  has  kept  her  spirit  youthful. 
She  has  a  sweet  smile  which  illuminates  a  face 
that  bespeaks  strong  character  in  every  feature. 
She  likes  to  talk  of  art,  but  she  loves  to  talk 
of  Rosa  Bonheur,  and  when  the  name  of  the 
great  artist  who  was  her  friend  is  on  her  lips 
her  face  is  radiant. 

Sitting  with  her  in  the  parlor  of  the  very  old 
house  in  Chestnut  street  which  is  the  home  of 
her  father,  I  was  fascinated  by  the  pleasure  she 
took  in  turning  over  the  leaves  of  her  biography 
of  Rosa  Bonheur  and  pointing  out  beautiful  re- 
productions of  the  great  masterpieces  one  after 
the  other. 

"When  I  was  a  little  girl  in  San  Francisco," 
she  said,  "I  heard  a  great  deal  about  Rosa  Bon- 
heur.   Her  'Horse  Fair"  was  being  exhibited  in 


LXXXIV— ANNA  KLUMPKE 

By  Edward  F.  O'Day 

the  large  cities  of  the  United  States,  and  like 
so  many  other  families  we  had  a  copy  of  it  hang- 
ing in  our  parlor.  My  mother  used  to  talk  to 
me  about  Rosa  Bonheur.  Some  times  she  would 
remark  how  fine  it  would  be  if  I  should  grow  up 
to  be  a  great  artist  like  her. 

"About  1880  I  went  to  Paris  and  began  to  study 
art.  I  saw  Rosa  Bonheur's  picture  'Plowing  in 
the  Nivernais'  in  the  Luxembourg  Gallery  and  set 
myself  to  copy  it.  I  could  not  paint  from  life 
yet,  but  I  could  copy  pretty  well.  Copying  that 
picture  brought  me  good  luck.  I  sold  it  for  two 
hundred  dollars  and  used  the  money  to  enter 
Julian's  Academy  where  Tony  Robert  Fleury  was 
the  master  and  Jules  Lefebvre  was  one  of  the  in- 
structors. 


riioto,  Vaughan  and  Fraser 


MISS  ANN.\  KLUMPKE 

"There  were  several  girls  at  Julian's.  One  of 
t!icm  was  Marie  Bashkirtchefif.  Marie  was  ex- 
ceedingly gifted,  as  you  know,  and  a  very  nice 
comrade.  At  the  end  of  the  term  we  had  what 
the  French  call  'concours,'  a  competition  for  a 
medal.  Marie  worked  just  in  back  of  me  and  she 
said  to  me  one  day  during  the  competition,  'Do 
you  expect  to  get  the  medal?  You  will  be  dis- 
appointed. I  am  going  to  win.'  I  replied  to  her, 
'Nevertheless  I  am  going  to  try.'  'If  you  win,' 
she  said  laughing,  'I'll  pay  for  the  punch,"  re- 
ferring to  the  little  festivity  we  had  on  these  oc- 
casions. Our  work  was  not  signed,  so  the  jury 
did  not  know  one  picture  from  another.  They 
decided  that  there  were  two  equally  good,  and 
that  two  silver  medals  should  be  given.  The 
winners  were  Mile.  Real  Delsarte  who  had  won 
medals  before,  and  myself.  Marie  Bashkirtchefif 
was  not  even  given  a  mention.  She  was  quite 
angry  and  stayed  away  for  two  weeks.  And 
when  she  came  back  I  didn't  have  the  courage 
to  remind  her,  'You  promised  the  punch.' 

"All  this  time  I  continued  to  be  interested  in 
the  works  of  Rosa  Bonheur.  Often  I  used  to  say, 
'Oh,  if  I  could  only  meet  this  wonderful  woman!' 


In  1885  I  received  an  honorable  mention  at  the 
Salon.  And  in  1889  I  received  the  Temple  gold 
medal  in  Philadelphia  for  the  best  figure  paint- 
ing. That  was  my  great  year,  for  I  also  re- 
ceived that  year  a  silver  medal  at  Versailles,  a 
bronze  medal  at  the  Universal  Exposition,  and 
on  the  second  of  October  I  met  Rosa  Bonheur." 

"You  see,"  said  Miss  Klumpke  smiling,  "I  re- 
member the  date.  Every  detail  of  that  first  meet- 
ing, every  word  that  was  spoken  is  impressed 
vividly  on  my  mind. 

"It  happened  that  she  wanted  a  wild  horse  from 
the  prairies  for  one  of  her  pictures,  and  a  gentle- 
man I  knew  obtained  it  for  her.  But  he  spoke 
no  French,  and  he  asked  me  to  go  with  him  to 
Rosa  Bonheur's  studio  at  By-Thomery. 

"  'Oh,  I  have  seen  your  work,'  she  cried  when 
we  met.  'I  have  seen  your  portait  of  your 
mother.' 

"That  portrait  was  in  the  Salon  of  that  year. 
Rosa  Bonheur  was  good  enough  to  praise  it  as 
well  as  others  of  my  pictures.  I  was  surprised 
that  she  knew  them. 

"After  that  I  was  persuaded  by  one  of  my 
friends  to  ask  her  to  pose  for  me.  She  consented 
and  I  went  to  By-Thomery  again.  After  I  had 
finished  the  portrait  she  asked  me  to  live  with 
her.  She  thought  that  I  looked  like  her  mother 
whom  she  had  lost  when  quite  young.  She  also 
asked  me  to  write  her  life. 

"I  did  not  live  with  Rosa  Bonheur  for  a  very 
long  time,  but  it  is  not  the  length  of  time  which 
makes  friendship;  it  is  the  expression  of  sj'm- 
pathy  which  comes  from  the  companionship. 

"At  her  death,  as  you  perhaps  know,  she  gave 
me  all  she  had,  asking  me  to  care  for  her  people 
according  to  her  desires. 

"I  keep  her  studio  just  as  it  was  during  her 
life.  I  allow  it  to  be  visited,  and  many  people 
go  to  By-Thomery  to  see  it.  I  charge  a  small 
sum  which  goes  to  a  bed  I  founded  in  Rosa  Bon- 
heur's memory  in  the  hospital  at  Fontainebleau. 
I  have  also  founded  in  her  honor  a  yearly  prize 
rf  three  hundred  dollars  at  the  Salon.  It  is 
awarded  for  the  best  picture  containing  animals. 
The  greatest  satisfaction  I  have  in  life  is  to 
keep  her  memory  green. 

"It  is  a  wonderful  thing,  is  it  not?  for  a  girl 
to  go  to  Paris  from  our  beautiful  Golden  Gate 
and  become  the  friend  of  Rosa  Bonheur." 

And  I  agreed  heartily. 

Miss  Klumpke  showed  me  copies  of  many  of 
her  portraits.  She  has  painted  many  distin- 
guished people,  among  thein  Madame  Marches!, 
Madame  Flammarion,  the  wife  of  the  astronomer, 

(Cuiitinucrl  on   Page  13.) 


Going  Abroad? 

To  the  Orient? 

To  the  Mediterranean? 

To  the  West  Indies? 

To  South  America? 

To  Egypt  and  the  Nile? 

To  London,  Paris,  Berlin  and  Italy? 

Around  the  World? 

Or  a  flight  in  a  Zeppelin  Airship? 

Get  profframi  of  our  Famous  Pleasure  Cruises 
Handsomely  illustated  pamphleU  gratis. 

HAMBURG-AMERICAN  LINE 

160  POWELL  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


6 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


Correspondence 


Clemency  for  Ruef 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  One  of  your  con- 
temporaries commenting  on  Ruef's  application 
for  a  hearing  before  the  Pardons  Board  says, 
"No  one  has  yet  advanced  the  faintest  reason 
why  clemency  should  be  directed  to  this  par- 
ticular criminal  except  the  inanely  weak  plea 
that  there  are  bad  men  outside  the  prison  as 
well  as  in";  also,  "The  only  valid  plea  that  could 
be  made  in  favor  of  Ruef  is  the  plea  that  he  is 
innocent."  This  was  probably  written  by  an 
editor  in  a  state  of  disgust  induced  by  the  maw- 
kish sentimentality  and  sickening  hypocrisy  of  the 
men  behind  the  freedom-for-Ruef  movement. 
One  may  sympathize  with  the  nauseated  editor 
and  at  the  same  time  dissent  from  his  views.  I 
have  no  interest  in  Ruef,  but  I  believe,  and  I  am 
sure  you  will  agree  with  me  that  a  man  in  a 
civil  or  criminal  action  is  entitled  to  a  fair  and 
impartial  trial  and  that  if  he  has  not  had  such  a 
trial  he  should  not  be  punished  in  pocket  or 
person.  These  principles  are  of  more  importance 
than  the  fate  of  a  thousand  Ruefs.  They  lie  at 
the  foundation  of  justice  even  as  justice  is  the 
foundation  of  every  government  worth  preserv- 
ing. The  real  question  then  is  not  whether  Ruef 
is  an  objectionable  or  vicious  character;  not 
whether  he  debauched  supervisors  and  preyed 
on  the  community;  not  whether  he  has  or  has 
not  committed  crimes  for  which  he  merits  his 
present  punishment;  but  whether  within  the  laws 
of  the  land  to  which  he  and  all  others  are  en- 
titled to  look  for  justice  and  equal  protection,  he 
was  fairly  tried  and  convicted.  If  not,  if  in  sub- 
stantial particulars  he  was  denied  such  a  trial, 
then  it  must  be  admitted  that  the  nauseated 
editor  erred  in  saying  that  the  Ruef  case  is  not 
to  be  differentiated  from  that  of  any  "murderer, 
burglar  or  thug."  Were  there,  then,  any  matters 
essential  to  fair  and  orderly  judicial  procedure 
in  which  Ruef  was  deprived  of  his  rights?  The 
answer  is:  Many. — 

1.  He  was  tried  before  Judge  Lawlor,  upon 
whose  conduct  in  this  and  like  cases  the  Bar 
Association  of  San  Francisco  has  recently  set  the 
seal  of  its  disapproval  by  refusing  him  an  en- 
dorsement for  re-election.  A  brief  of  542  pages 
is  of  record  in  the  Court  of  Appeals,  every  word 
of  it  addressed  to  the  misconduct  of  Lawlor. 

2.  The  jury  was  a  packed  jury  secured  by  the 
Hcney  and  Burns  of  the  Jones  case  of 
Oregon  and  by  the  same  methods  employed 
in  that  case;  methods  which  the  very  Depart- 
ment of  Justice  of  the  United  States  which  em- 
ployed Heney  has  declared  so  outrageous  to  fair- 
play  and  decency  as  to  demand  the  pardon  of 
the  man  so  convicted.  That  pardon  the  Presi- 
dent of  the  United  States,  himself  a  high  judge, 
has  granted:  Because  of  these  practices,  Heney 
himself  should  be  disbarred  and  Burns  forever 
forbidden  to  produce  evidence  before  a  court  of 
justice. 

3.  Haas  shot  Heney  during  this  trial.  That 
shooting  spelled  conviction  for  Ruef  before  that 
jury.  He  made  every  effort  for  continuance  un- 
til passion  should  cool,  but  his  motions  were,  of 
course,  denied.  It  was  venomously  suggested 
and  charged  that  Ruef  had  inspired  the  shooting, 
and  subtly  to  impress  this  on  the  jury  Judge  Law- 
lor ordered  Ruef  in  custody  and  kept  him  in 
custody  during  the  remainder  of  the  trial,  not- 
withstanding his  heavy  bail.  Thus  with  devilish 
ingenuity  he  conveyed  the  idea  to  the  jury  that 
while  free  on  bail  as  to  the  charge  on  trial  Ruef 
•was  held  in  imprisonment  on  the  charge  of  mur- 
dering Heney. 


4.  At  this  time  Hiram  Johnson  came  into  the 
case.  Johnson's  ability  to  tear  a  passion  into 
tatters  and  invoke  the  "living  God  on  High"  for 
self-aggrandizement  or  for  lucre  is  his  conspicous 
as  it  has  proved  his  most  valuable  asset.  The 
shooting  of  Heney,  so  the  court  solemnly  de- 
clared, should  not  be  commented  on.  Yet  here 
follow  extracts  from  the  speech  of  Johnson  which 
could  be  multiplied  a  hundred  times:  "All  this 
tommy-rot,  all  this  wandering  about,  all  this  trial, 
trouble,  tribulation — all  this  blood — all  to  deter- 
mine what?"  "Away  with  the  bribers  of  wit- 
nesses; away  with  the  bribers  of  jurors;  away 
with  the  dynamiters;  away  with  the  assassins; 
away  with  them  all,  and  if  you  don't  do  it  we 
want  to  know  the  reason  why."  Mr.  Johnson 
knew  the  city  was  aflame  with  passion  over  the 
shooting  of  Heney,  knew  the  jury  knew  it,  and 
knew  that  with  a  complacent  judge  he  could 
threaten  the  jury.  Read  these  extracts  from  his 
"argument"  delivered  in  a  court  of  law.  "Are 
you  in  the  face  of  that,  to  turn  him  loose  and 
tell  him  hence  to  go:  And  if  you  are  ready  to  do 
it,  by  the  gods  above,  we  will  know  the  reason 
you  are  ready  to  do  it  before  this  trial  is  past." 
But  Mr.  Johnson  is  as  versatile  in  his  religious 
beliefs  as  in  his  political.  Elsewhere  he  becomes 
a  monotheist;  as  witness:  "Why,  if  you  don't 
convict  this  man,  may  God  in  his  infinite  mercy 
or  worse  call  upon  you  the  consequences  of  your 
act.  If  when  he  pleads  himself  guilty  as  he  has 
in  this  case,  you  dare  to  violate  your  oaths  and 
say  he  is  not  guilty,  may  the  good  God  deal  with 
you  because,  by  Heavens,  the  People  will  not." 
Is  comment  on  this  necessary? 

5.  Judge  Lawlor  instructed  the  jury  as  did 
Judge  Dunne  in  the  Coffey  case  that  Gallagher, 
particeps  criminis  with  Ruef  was  not  .in  accom- 
plice. The  Coffey  case  had  been  ordered  to 
hearing  before  the  Supreme  Court  because  of  this 
very  instruction.  The  same  question  was  in  the 
Ruef  case  and  the  same  order  for  hearing  before 
the  Supreme  Court  was  naturally  made.  For  here- 
in the  two  cases  were  identical.  The  Supreme 
Court  in  the  Coffey  case  by  six  of  its  justices. 
Justice  Angellotti  for  some  undisclosed  reason 
failing  either  to  concur  or  dissent,  held  and 
showed  that  the  instruction  was  in  conflict  with 
the  law  and  with  every  decision  of  this  State  and 
of  every  other  State  save  one,  and  granted  Coffey 
a  new  trial.  At  the  time  the  order  was  granted 
a  hearing,  before  the  Ruef  case  in  the  Supreme 
Court  became  operative.  Justice  Hen^ihaw,  who 
had  signed  it  before  his  departure,  was  absent 
from  the  State.  The  very  technical  ground  was 
advanced  and  upheld  that  his  signature  under 
these  circumstances  was  without  legal  efficacy. 
Concededly  it  was  a  new  point;  concededly  the 
members  of  the  court  had  always  acted  in  the 
same  way  never  doubting  the  validity  of  an  order 
so  made.  For  it  is  unbelievable  that  Justices 
Shaw  and  Sloss  who  concurred  in  the  Coffey 
decision,  would  not  themselves  have  signed  the 
order  had  they  not  believed  it  carried  sufficient 
signatures.  Yet  because  of  this  technical  matter, 
and  through  no  fault  of  his  own  Ruef  was  denied 
a  rehearing  which  could  have  resulted  only  in  one 
way. 

I  am  a  lawyer  who  writes  with  absolute  in- 
difference to  Ruef  as  a  man,  but  with  a  pro- 
found interest  in  the  due  administration  of  jus- 
tice. But  this  at  least  should  be  remembered  and 
recorded  to  his  credit.  He  is  not  in  prison  for 
any  crime  which  he  did  commit.  Heney  and 
Spreckels  and  Older  gave  him  complete  immunity 
as  to  all  of  them.    He  is  in  prison  for  the  crime 


he  would  not  commit —  the  crime  of  bearing  false 
witness  against  his  fellow  .  man.  Who  doubts 
but  that  Ruef  would  be  free  today  had  he  been 
willing  to  testify  as  the  public  prosecutors  de- 
manded? Who  shall  measure  the  force  of  the 
temptations  and  coercions  that  were  employed  to 
break  his  will  to  this  base  end?  That  they  failed 
to  bend  him,  that  depraved  as  he  is  said  to  tie, 
he  steadfastly  refused  to  buy  his  freedom  at  the 
price  of  this  infamy,  stamps  him  in  the  judgment 
of  the  writer  a  better  man  than  his  tempters.  So 
I  appeal  from  the  editor  nauseated  to  the  editor 
composed,  and  ask  you  whether  there  are  not 
here  circumstances  which  differentiate  Ruef's 
case  from  the  ordinary;  whether  he  has  not  been 
denied  his  constitutional  right  to  a  fair  and  im- 
partial trial,  and  whether  the  Governor  of  the 
State,  to  repair  the  part  he  took  in  this  judicial 
outrage,  ought  not  to  extend  executive  clemency 
to  Ruef — as  the  President  of  the  United  States 
upon  a  showing  not  half  so  black  has  felt  im- 
pelled to  do  in  the  case  of  Jones? 

Respectfully, 

— A  Lawyer. 


Not  a  Bad  Idea 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  Why  don't  you  appl 
to  Terrible  Teddy  the  words  which  Lor 
Beaconsfield  used  with  reference  to  Gladstone 
Beaconsfield  called  Gladstone  "a  sophistica 
rhetorician  inebriated  with  the  exuberance  of  hi 
own  verbosity  and  gifted  with  an  egotistical  im 
agination  that  can  at  all  times  command  an  in 
terminable  and  inconsequent  series  of  argument 
to  malign  an  opponent  and  to  glorify  himself.' 
Seems  to  me  these  words  fit  Teddy  much  mor 
closely  than  they  ever  fitted  Gladstone. 

Respectfully, 

— Historicus. 


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July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


Perspective  Impressions 


Why  does  Grandmother  Works  insist  on  being 
accouched  of  his  ideas  in  public? 


We  miss  Mary  Garden.  Isn't  it  time  she  got 
into  the  papers  again? 


Rudolph  Spreckels  must  be  a  boon  to  the  tel- 
egraph companies. 


We  are  for  the  public  ownership  of  wild  game, 
but  opposed  on  ultra-progrcssive-humanitarian 
grounds  to  the  killing  of  wild  game.  Let  the 
public  catch  the  wild  game,  and  make  household 
pets  of  the  graceful  duck  and  the  musical  quail. 
Thus  will  direct  action  go  hand  in  hand  with  the 
uplift. 


The  forty  politicians  who  want  Works  to  re- 
sign ought  to  try  Christian  Science. 


A  problem  in  State  politics:  Of  the  forty 
Progessives  who  called  for  the  resignation  of 
Senator  Works  how  many  want  his  job? 


Anyway  "Mission  Jim"  has  given  us  a  "munic- 
ipal band."  But  has  municipal  music  charms  to 
soothe  the  overpulled  taxpayer's  leg? 


The  Prohibitionists  demand  uniform  marriage 
and  divorce  laws.  Will  unifortnity  in  these  mat- 
ters solve  the  problem  of  the  high  cost  of  living? 


If,  as  the  New  York  World  says,  suicide  in- 
creases with  education,  should  we  not  on  the  prin- 
ciple of  all  our  popular  prohibitions  either  close 
our  schools  or  hang  our  dangerous  college  pro- 
fessors? 


Comely  girl  in  Macon,  Ga.,  dragged  from  her 
bed,  stripped  and  scourged  by  two  men  because 
a  youth  was  infatuated  with  her. — News  item. 
Brethren,  we  are  today  receiving  contributions  for 
the  maintenance  of  the  Mission  in  China.  Let 
us  not  forget,  we  who  are  enjoying  all  the  benefits 
of  a  Christian  civilization,  that  it  is  our  duty 
to  rescue  the  heathen  from  eternal  damnation. 


"Scandal  In  The  Police  Department." — News- 
paper headline.  That's  one  thing  the  police 
never  arrest. 


The  club  woman  of  Chicago  have  started  a 
crusade  against  tight  skirts  because,  says  a  press 
despatch,  "tight  skirts  are  constructed  with  the 
sole  idea  of  displaying  feminine  charms."  How 
unreasonable!  The  sole  idea  is  the  tight  skirt's 
sole  justification. 


How  singular  that  a  society  girl  should  go  to 
Los  Angeles  to  voice  a  protest  against  chaperons! 
Los  Angeles  is  the  chaperon  of  cities.  Los  An- 
geles is  the  municipilization  of  Mrs.  Grundy.  Los 
.\ngeles  is  paternalism  run  mad.  Los  Angeles  is 
Puritanism  incorporated.  Los  Angeles  is  Peck- 
sniff communized.  In  Los  Angeles  everybody 
has  a  virtuous  eye  for  sins  he  has  no  mind  to 
and  rebates  on  sins  that  he's  inclined  to. 


The  Rag 


Jean  Pornic,  seaman  in  the  ship  commanded  by 
Romainville,  had  conducted  himself  well.  He  had 
been  a  good  sailor,  faithful  to  duty.  He  was 
frank,  exact,  neat  and  willing.  His  officers  re- 
gretted that  his  lack  of  education  forbade  his  pro- 
motion. As  he  was  active  and  quick-witted  (a 
quality  even  more  desirable  at  sea  than  ashore), 
Romainville  had  taken  him  for  his  personal  at- 
tendant. While  the  ship  was  in  the  harbor  of 
Brest,  Pornic  was  admirable.  If  he  was  a  little 
the  worse  for  cider  once  or  twice,  the  fact  was 
not  known  to  the  crew.  What  was  known  was 
that  he  was  obedient,  faithful,  and,  in  short,  every- 
thing that  a  seaman  ought  to  be. 

But  Romainville  was  ordered  to  a  ship  in  the 
harbor  of  Toulon,  and  in  a  wine  shop  near  the 
wharves  Pornic  fell  under  the  spell  of  an  anarchist 
propagandist.  Sitting  in  the  wine  shop,  elbows 
on  the  table,  chin  in  hands,  he  listened  on  until, 
won  by  the  fiery  eloquence  of  the  radical,  he  be- 
lieved and  felt  in  his  inmost  soul  all  that  he 
heard. 

His  calm  nature  and  the  lack  of  occasion  pre- 
vented an  exposure  of  his  new  ideas.  In  the  ship 
he  was  close  to  the  commander,  and  the  com- 
mander's indulgence  gave  him  no  excuse  for  re- 
volt. But  as  his  convictions  gained  strength,  his 
manner  changed  and  his  mocking  air  and  the 
strange  look  in  his  brown  eyes  attracted  the 
officer's  attention.  Romainville  attributed  the 
man's  defiant  looks  to  consciousness  of  some 
secret  business  of  a  purely  personal  character;  so, 
shutting  himself  in  his  room  with  Pornic,  he 
talked  as  a  father  talks  to  a  son  of  temptations 
and  the  dangers  of  life. 

Pornic  did  not  answer. 

A  little  later  the  ship  received  sailing  orders. 
The  roll  was  called.    Pornic  was  not  there. 

"I  guessed  aright!"  thought  Romainville.  "He 
has  been  bewitched  by  a  girl,  and  now,  when  I 
am  ready  to  sail,  he  is  gone!" 

He  held  the  ship  and  a  search  gang  went  ashore. 

They  found  Pornic  in  a  wine  shop  with  three 
anarchists.    All  four  were  on  fire   with  drink. 


By  Leon  Berthaut  (From  the  French) 

Pornic  cursed  the  navy,  threatened  to  blow  up 
the  ship,  and,  aided  by  the  anarchists,  fought  the 
seamen.  The  seamen  sent  them  rolling  under  the 
tables;  then  they  dragged  their  drunkard  back  to 
duty. 

In  the  commander's  office,  alone  with  Romain- 
ville, Pornic  opened  his  heart. 

"Absent  without  leave?  I'm  a  free  man,  ain't 
I?  The  Navy?  Sheep!  The  country?  One 
country's  as  good  as  another!  The  flag?  A  rag! 
Let  it  go  hang!" 

Romainville  eyed  him;  then,  taking  him  by  the 
arms,  he  shoved  him  toward  the  door. 

"Go  to  bed!"  he  said  sternly.  "Turn  in  at  once! 
You  are  drunk  and  a  man  drunk  is  a  beast.  I 
will  talk  to  you  tomorrow." 

Pornic  glared.  "I'll  sleep  here!"  he  said 
roughly.  "I  like  this  place.  What's  good  for  you 
is  good  for  me!" 

Romainville  spoke  in  a  low  voice.  "Be  still! 
If  you  are  heard  discipline  will  force- me  to  punish 
you." 

A  flood  of  abuse  rushed  to  the  sailor's  lips. 
The  commander  forced  him  to  the  door.  At  the 
door  Pornic  turned  and  struck  the  commander  in 
the  face;  the  blow  fell  just  above  the  jaw.  "If 
it  leaves  a  mark,"  Romainville  said  to  himself,  "I 
can  say  that  I  ran  against  my  door  in  the  dark. 
The  man  is  drunk;  he  is  not  responsible." 

Using  but  little  of  his  herculean  strength,  he 
threw  the  sailor,  held  him  down  with  one  hand 
and  with  the  other  opened  a  cupboard  and  took 
out  a  roll  of  stout  webbing.  With  that  he  bound 
Pornic  hand  and  foot.  Then  he  laid  him  on  the 
floor  by  the  wall. 

"Lie  there,"  he  said  calmly.  "Sleep  off  your 
drink.    In  the  morning  we  will  talk." 

Morning  came.  Pornic  was  sober.  Romain- 
ville set  him  free. 

"Now,  Pornic,"  said  he,  "Attention!  Mark  well 
what  I  say  to  you.  This  matter  is  between  you 
and  me.  Last  night,  when  senseless  from  drink, 
you  struck  me.  May  the  Eternal  Judge  deal 
with  me  as  I  deal  with  you!    .    .    .    In  my  own 


country  I  have  a  brother.  His  eyes  are  like  your 
eyes.  .  .  .  When  I  look  at  you  I  think  of 
him." 

In  silence  Pornic  listened.  Romainville  said  in 
a  low  voice:  "You  may  go,  Pornic.  The  ship 
sailed  at  midnight.  We  are  on  blue  water.  When 
the  sea  has  spoken  to  you  with  all  its  voices,  I 
will  talk  to  you  again." 

Pornic  saluted,  and  without  a  word  passed  from 
the  commander's  presence.  Romainville  said  to 
himself,  "I  have  ignored  discipline,  but  before  the 
law  of  Arms  comes  the  law  of  Love.  It  was  not 
the  man  that  did  the  evil;  it  was  the  drink.  He 
is  in  my  hands,  he  is  weak,  I  am  strong.  The 
vast  solitude  of  the  sea  will  bring  him  to  him- 
self. He  will  come  back  to  me,  and  at  the  last 
I  shall  be  glad  that  I  spared  him." 

But  the  days  passed  and  Pornic  showed  no  sign 
of  softening.  He  did  his  work,  but  his  averted 
eyes  were  hard.  They  reached  the  west  coast  of 
Africa.  The  ship  entered  a  harbor  shut  in  by 
mountains.  The  day  was  closing,  and  the  flag, 
hailed  by  the  clarions,  had  fluttered  down.  The 
rich  light  of  the  African  sunset  gave  mysterious 
meaning  to  the  always  impressive  beauty  of  the 
salute  to  the  colors.  Romainville's  eyes  rested 
on  the  grave  faces  of  the  seamen  and  his  heart 
thrilled.    Pornic  saw  the  tears  on  the  bronzed 


(Continued  on  Page  21.) 


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TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


Poems  About  San  Francisco 

/'^^F^c^o'^.t^^:'':::^-:;.:^:^^^  L?'^!^'^^-^-"-  ?!.?  fPl-  over  the  wa.ers 

rebruary,  1903.) 


poen,  was  written  by  Herbert  Rashford  for--Sun7et.  Vnd  was-puWisSed^n  th;rmagaz„ 

L— SAILING 

By  Herbert  Bashford 


Wind  and  wave  and  gold-washed  weather, 
Wind  flung  loose  and  wave  set  free; 

She  and  I  alone  t<jgether 
Sailing  on  a  sapphire  sea. 

Clang  and  clamor  of  the  crowded 
City  street  we  hear  no  more — 

Only  billows,  foam  enshrouded. 
Freighting  music  to  the  shore. 


Sail  full-blown  and  sharp  prow  flinging 

Floods  of  song  on  either  side; 
White  gulls  in  the  wide  blue  winging — 
■  Gipsies  of  the  roving  tide! 

Peaks  afar  that  know  the  splendor 
Of  the  sunset's  waste  of  wine; 

Twilight  sky  grown  strangely  tender. 
Like  the  eyes  that  look  in  mine! 


George  Wingfield  Explains 

George  Wingfield  never  had  any  intention  of 
accepting  Governor  Oddie's  ofTer  of  the  United 
States  senatorship.    "I  took  a  couple  of  days  to 
think  it  over,"  he  told  me  the  other  day,  "but  my 
mind  was  made  up  the  moment  the  oflFer  was 
made  to  me.    It  was  very  flattering.    It  was  very 
nice  of  the  Governor  to  offer  me  my  old  partner's 
place.    And  it  was  fine  to  have  every  newspaper 
in  the  State,  Republican  and  Democratic,  with 
just  two  exceptions,  say  that  they  approved  of 
me  for  the  Senate.    I  appreciate  all  that  very 
much.    But  I  decided  not  to  take  it  the  minute 
the  Governor  made  the  offer.    .\nd  I  didn't  recon- 
sider my  decision.    Besides,  I  didn't  like  to  think 
of  going  away  from  my  place  in  Lassen  County." 
George  Wingfield  has  a  wonderful  estate  in  Cali- 
fornia.   His  eye  sparkles  when  he  talks  about  it. 
There  are  twenty-one  hundred  acres  of  land,  farm, 
orchard,  water  and  game  preserve  surrounded,  as 
he  informed  me,  by  a  close-meshed  wire  fence 
eight  feet  high.    There  is  a  comfortable  home  on 
this  great  place;  there  are  two  lakes  and  a  stream 
plentifully  stocked  with  fish.    In   the  preserves 
are    deer,    elk,    grouse,   partridge,    pheasant — all 
sorts  of  game  to  gladden  the  hearts  of  Wing- 
field's  sportsmen  friends.    The  place  is  still  in  the 
making.    It  is  only  two  years  old,  and  it  will 
take  at  least  three  more  to  get  it  into  good  shape. 
It  is  only  four  miles  by  motor  from  Reno,  and 
Wingfield   likes   to  run   across   the   border  fre- 
quently to  look  it  over.    Washington  is  a  long 
way  from  that  estate  in  Lassen.    So  Diocletian 
sticks  to  his  cabbages.     Cincinattus  refuses  to  leave 
his  plow. 


As  To  Newlands 

It  is  pretty  well  known  that  Xewlands  and 
Wingfield  are  not  the  best  of  friends.  So  I  asked 
him  if  he  intended,  later  on,  to  give  battle  for 
the  United  States  Senatorship  to  the  dapper 
little  part-owner  of  our  Palace  Hotel.  "I've  never 
given  it  any  thought,"  he  answered.  Which  is 
an  answer  sufficiently  vague  to  lend  itself  to  the 


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The  Spectator 

speculative  purposes  of  those  who  figure  out 
future  political  events.  The  nearest  I  came  to 
making  Wingfield  commit  himself  in  the  matter 
was  when  he  discussed  political  parties.  I  asked 
him  whether  he  was  a  Republican  or  a  Democrat. 
"The  parties  are  so  shot  to  pieces  that  it's  hard 
for  anybody  to  say  what  he  is,"  was  his  reply. 
"But  if  you  ran  for  office,"  I  said.  "Oh,  if  I  ran 
for  office  I  suppose  I'd  run  as  a  Republican,"  he 
answered.  If  Senator  Newlands  can  decide  from 
that  whether  George  Wingfield  is  to  be  his  next 
opponent  for  the  Senatorship,  he's  a  better 
guesser  of  Delphic  riddles  than  I  am. 


He  Was  Not  Grub-Staked 

"How  much  truth  is  there  in  that  story  about 
Senator  Xixon  grub-staking  you?"  Wingfield  was 
asked.  The  reference  was  to  that  yarn  about 
Nixon  passing  a  stack  of  twenties  across  the 
counter  of  his  bank  to  the  impecunious  Wingfield, 
and  about  Wingfield  taking  Nixon  in  on  his  pros- 
pects when  he  struck  it  rich.  "I've  never  taken 
the  trouble  to  deny  that  story,"  said  Wingfield. 
"The  fact  is  I  didn't  like  to  deny  it.  But  it's 
just  about  as  true  as  that  story  a  New  York 
paper  had  about  the  notches  on  my  gun.  Nixon 
never  grub-staked  me  any  more  than  you  did.  I 
knew  Nixon  from  the  time  when  I  was  a  boy  in 
Winncmucca.  In  1902  I  went  to  Tonopah  to  look 
things  over.  While  I  was  there  Nixon  wrote  to 
me.  asking  what  I  thought  about  the  camp.  I 
wrote  to  him  that  I  thought  it  was  worth  while. 
He  came  to  Tonopah  and  went  in  with  me.  That's 
how  we  started  together.  And  we  stayed  to- 
gether for  seven  years." 


Overheard  in  Grant  Avenue 

It  was  a  motley  crowd  of  the  great  unsoaped. 
Concerning  their  character  it  need  only  be  said 
that  they  were  not  as  bad  as  Lincoln  StefTcns 
professes  to  be,  for  they  were  not  Christians; 
merely  socialists  and  anarchists.  One  sweating 
Won't-Work  was  telling  the  toilers  present  about 
their  wrongs.  "Look  about  you  at  the  homes 
in  this  great  city,"  he  cried  raucously.  "Who 
built  'em?  Why,  you  workingmen!  And  who 
ought  to  live  in  'em?  Why,  you  workingmen! 
Every  worker  is  entitled  to  the  fruit  of  his  hon- 
est toil."  He  paused  for  applause  and  got  it. 
Then  up  spake  a  mild  little  man  with  a  mild  lit- 
tle voice.  "I'm  a  tailor,"  he  confessed.  "Do  you 
mean  to  say  that  if  I  make  a  pair  of  pants  for 
one  of  my  customers  I  ought  to  wear  'em?"  The 
sweating  Won't-Work  regarded  the  little  man 
with  scorn.  "Men  like  you,"  he  thundered,  "are 
a  bar  to  progress." 


She  Thinks  Bacon  Wrote  'Em 

Gertrude  Atherton  is  the  very  latest  to  an- 
nounce herself  a  Baconian.  In  a  recent  interview 
she  thus  declared  herself:  "Bacon  wrote 
Shakespeare,  and  there  is  no  doubt  in  my  mind 
but  that  Bacon  was  the  son  of  Queen  Elizabeth 
and  Dudley.  Some  friends  of  mine  in  England 
have  been  urging  me  to  write  a  novel  with  Bacon 
as  the  hero.  I  should  of  course  tell  how  he 
wrote  the  plays  while  he  was  in  priscjn,  and  the 
book  would  be  to  the  Baconians  what  "Julia 
France'  is  to  the  suflfragettes.  The  difficulty  is 
that  most  people  who  have  not  gone  into  the 
subject  consider  the  advocates  of  the  Bacon  au- 
thorship cranks.  In  a  novel  one  does  not  prove 
statements,  nor  can  one  bring  out  a  body  of  au- 
thority, so  by  making  the  Baconian  theory  the 
underlying  idea  of  the  story,  I  should  in  all 
likelihood  lay  myself  open  to  ridicule — instead  of 
consideration.  Moreover,  I  prefer  to  depict 
modern  life." 


A  Thesis  Novel 

In  saying  that  one  cannot  bring  out  a  body 
of  authority  in  a  novel  Mrs.  Atherton  slights  the 
work  of  our  fellow-townsman  Wilbur  Zeigler. 
Before  Wilbur  turned  to  the  dryasdust  activities 
of  the  law  he  wielded  a  literary  pen.  It  was  his 
pet  idea  that  the  plays  of  Shakespeare  were 
written,  not  by  "Sweet  Will,"  not  by  "the  wisest, 
brightest,  meanest  of  mankind"  but  by  that  swash- 
buckling, carousing  and  wenching  molder  of  "the 
mighty  line,"  good  old  Kit  Marlowe.  Zeigler 
called  his  romance  "It  Was  Marlowe"  and  tried 
to  prove  it.  The  apparently  insuperable  difficulty 
that  Marlowe  was  killed  in  a  tavern  brawl  in 
1593  before  the  great  bulk  of  the  Shakespearian 
plays  were  given  to  the  world  was  no  real  dif- 
ficulty to  Zeigler.  The  romance  showed  that 
Marlowe  wasn't  killed,  and  that  the  entry  in  the 
parish  record  at  Deptford  was  a  delusion  and  a 


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July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


9 


snare.  "It  Was  Marlowe"  made  interesting  read- 
ing, because  Zeigler  knew  the  period  whereof  he 
wrote,  but  it  was  no  more  convincing  than 
Ignatius    Donnelly's   "Great  Cryptogram." 


Another  Bacon  Adherent 

"So  Gertrude  Atherton  has  joined  the  ranks  of 
the  Baconians,"  said  Richard  Bennett  to  a  choice 
circle  of  friends  who  were  whiling  away  a  half- 
hour  in  the  club  room  of  the  St.  Francis.  "Well, 
she's  in  mighty  good  company,  for  there  are 
many  distinguished  men  and  women  who  insist 
on  robbing  poor  old  Stratford  Will  of  his  laurels. 
But  I  fancy  Mrs.  Atherton  would  not  care  for 
the  support  of  a  faded  tragedian  I  know  who  be- 
longs to  the  gallant  army  of  Coast  Defenders." 
"Let's  have  the  story,  Dick,"  said  Tom  O'Connor. 
"My  Coast  Defender  friend  was  present  when 
the  Baconian  theory  was  being  discussed,"  ex- 
plained Bennett.  "Somebody  had  ventured  the 
bromidic  argument  that  the  play-going  public 
would  never  accept  Bacon  as  the  author  of  the 
plays.  'I'm  not  so  sure  of  that,'  said  my 
tragedian  friend  moodily.  'When  I  played  Ham- 
let at  Petaluma  the  audience  were  clearly  of  the 
opinion  that  we  were  playing  Bacon.'  'How  did 
you  know?'  the  Coast  Defender  was  asked.  'They 
all  brought  eggs!'" 


Childe  Charlie's  Pilgrimage 

There  was  a  sound  of  revelry  by  night. 
And  all  the  beach  resorts  had  gathered  then 
Our  beauty  and  our  sousery,  and  bright 
The  bulbs  shone  o'er  fair  women  and  gay  men; 
A  thousand  sports  drank  happily;  and  when 
Music  arose  in  turkey-trotting  swell, 
Soft  eyes  looked  love  to  eyes  which  winked  again. 
And  all  went  noisy  as  a  dinner-bell; 
But  hush!  hark!  a  deep  voice  strikes  like  a  ris- 
ing knell. 

Did  ye  not  hear  it? — No;  'twas  but  the  wind. 
Or  auto  honking  round  the  Cliff  House  turn; 
On  with  the  dance!  let  joy  be  unconfined; 
No  sleep  till  morn,  when  Youth  and  Pleasure 
yearn 

To  rag  their  heads  off  and  their  money  burn. 
But  hark!  that  heavy  sound  breaks  in  once  more, 
As  if  the  waves  its  echoes  did  return; 
And  nearer,  clearer,  deadlier  than  before! 
Vamoose!  Skidoo!  it  is — Kid  Fickert's  football 
roar! 

And  there  was  cranking  in  hot  haste:  the  squab 
And  "model"  husband  in  the  touring  car 
Went  skidding  homeward  with  impetuous  throb 
Of  high-power  engine;  from  the  busy  bar 
And  the  piano  that  did  gaily  hum 
They  beat  it  quickly,  shooting  like  a  star, 
While  thronged  the  singers  all  with  terror  dumb. 
Or  gasping  wildly — "Fickert's  men!    They  come! 
they  come!" 


Tim's  White  Hope 

Tim  McGrath,  the  man  who  invented  Tom 
Sharkey,  has  a  white  hope  named  Charlie  Miller. 
Charlie  is  as  big  as  the  facade  of  a  skyscraper, 
and  although  he  hasn't  shown  white  hope  "class" 
just  yet,  has  acquitted  himself  well  enough  in 
several  professional  encounters.  I  was  present 
the  other  day  when  Tim  was  asked  how  he  came 
to  discover  Charlie.  "Well,  it  was  this  way," 
said  Tim  with  that  bashful  air  of  his.  "I  was 
in  the  country  one  day  and  I  lost  my  way.  I 
went  up  to  a  farmer  who  was  plowing  and  asked 
him  the  right  way.  He  picked  up  his  plow  and 
pointed  with  it.    That  was  Charlie." 


Two  Generations  of  Friends 

In  the  lobby  of  the  Columbia  this  week  are  dis- 


played two  old  playbills.  One  tells  of  the  last 
appearance  on  any  stage  of  the  elder  Hackett. 
The  other  is  the  bill  of  a  benefit  given  to  the  elder 
Holland.  The  bills  tell  the  story  of  a  friendship 
which  has  been  inherited.  The  elder  Hackett  and 
the  elder  Holland  were  pals  through  life.  Their 
sons  were  boys  together  and  have  been  pals 
throughout  their  stage  careers.  It  is  said  that 
the  friendship  existing  between  James  K.  Hackett 
and  Edward  M.  Holland  has  never  been  inter- 
rupted by  a  misunderstanding  or  quarrel.  That 
the  two  men  find  great  delight  in  being  together 
was  apparent  to  everybody  at  the  Columbia  Mon- 
day night.  Hackett  insisted  that  Holland  share 
his  curtain  calls.  At  the  end  of  the  third  act 
when  Hackett  had  to  make  a  speech  lie  said  that 
when  he  first  produced  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  he 
supposed  that  Holland  was  supporting  him.  "But 
for  some  time  now  I  have  realized  that  I'm  sup- 
porting Holland."  Then  he  insisted  that  Holland 
make  a  speech,  and  the  latter  modestly  insisted 
that  he  was  only  a  small  part  of  the  show.  But 
nobody  who  saw  "The  Grain  of  Dust"  agreed 
with  him. 


Last  of  the  Victorians 

"He  collaborated  with  Rider  Haggard  in  'The 
World's  Desire.'  "  That  is  what  a  press  despatch 
tells  us  of  Andrew  Lang  who  died  last  Sunday 
in  Scotland.  Nothing  more.  What  a  curious 
thing  is  fame!  Andrew  Lang  was  so  prolific  a 
writer  that  somebody  once  observed,  "A.  Lang 
isn't  a  man;  it's  a  syndicate."  Yet  Andrew  Lang 
on  his  death  is  remembered  by  the  press  as  a 
literary  partner  of  Rider  Haggard,  the  one  cir- 
cumstance in  his  career  which  might  just  as  well 
have  been  forgotten.  With  the  death  of  Andrew 
Lang  is  dissolved  one  of  the  last  of  the  links 
in  the  chain  that  connected  the  Victorian  and 
our  own  period  of  English  literature.  Born  in 
the  early  forties  of  the  last  century,  he  mingled 
in  the  society  of  Carlyle,  Ruskin,  Rosetti,  Brown- 
ing, Tennyson,  Arnold,  Swinburne  and  Meredith, 
and  he  lived  to  become  the  dean  of  English  let- 
ters. Andrew  Lang  was  in  the  true  sense  of  the 
term  a  man  of  letters.  He  was  poet,  critic,  his- 
torian, folklorist.  His  first  work.  Ballads  and 
Lyrics  of  Old  France,  was  published  in  1872. 
One  of  the  most  notable  of  his  works  was  pub- 
lished less  than  three  years  ago,  a  life  of  Joan 
of  Arc,  entitled  "The  Maid  of  France."  This 
work  was  inspired  by  Anatole  France's  life  of 
Joan  wherein  the  Frenchman  to  prove  his 
hypothesis  regarding  the  achievements  of  the 
saviour  of  her  country  misled  his  readers  by  many 
perversions  of  the  official  records.  Lang  exam- 
ined all  of  France's  references,  and  convicted  him 
beyond  peradventure  of  gross  intellectual  dis- 
honesty. Among  other  notable  productions  of 
Lang's  pen  are  his  translation  of  the  Odyssey 
and  the  Illiad,  his  History  of  Scotland  from  the 
Roman  Occupation,  his  Mystery  of  Mary  Stuart 
and  John  Knox  and  the  Reformation. 


Stevenson's  Tribute 

In  recent  years  Andrew  Lang  has  been  a  con- 
stant contributor  to  the  leading  magazines  of 
London  and  he  spent  much  of  his  time  in  that 
city  where  he  enjoyed  the  warm  esteem  of  his 
junior  contemporaries — such  men  as  Chesterton, 
Shaw,  Bennett  and  Galsworthy,  to  whom  his  was 
a  venerable  voice  from  the  past,  from  a  period 
rich  inmemories  dear  to  the  heart  of  aspiring 
literary  genius.  A  man  of  very  sweet  temper,  of 
noble  ideals,  was  Lang  as  one  may  learn  from 
his  critical  essays  on  Dumas,  Lever,  Dickens, 
Kipling  and  Stevenson.  Lang  and  R.  L.  S.,  by 
the  way,  were  intimate  friends,  and  to  that 
friendship  we  are  indebted  for  a  poem  from  the 
pen  of  the  man  who  lies  buried  in  Samoa: 


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10 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


Dear  Andrew,  with  the  brindled  hair, 

Who  glory  to  have  thrown  in  air, 

High  over  arm,  the  trembling  reed, 

By  Ale  and  Kail,  by  Till  and  Tweed: 

An  equal  craft  of  hand  you  show 

The  pen  to  guide,  the  fly  to  throw: 

I  count  you  happy  starred;  for  God, 

When  he  with  inkpot  and  with  rod 

Endowed  you,  bade  your  fortune  lead 

Forever  by  the  crooks  of  Tweed, 

Forever  by  the  woods  of  song 

And  lands  that  to  the  Muse  belong; 

Or  if  in  peopled  streets,  or  in 

The  abhorred  pedantic  sanhcdrin, 

It  should  be  yours  to  wander,  still 

Airs  of  the  morn,  airs  of  the  hill, 

The  plovery  Forest  and  the  seas 

That  break  about  the  Hebrides, 

Should  follow  over  field  and  plain 

And  find  you  at  the  window  pane; 

And  you  again  see  hill  and  peel. 

And  the  bright  springs  gush  at  your  heel. 

So  went  the  fiat  forth,  and  so 

Garrulous  like  a  brook  you  go. 

With  sound  of  happy  mirth  and  sheen 

Of  daylight— whether  by  the  green 

You  fare  that  moment,  or  the  grey; 

Whether  you  dwell  in  March  or  May; 

Or  whether  treat  of  reels  and  rods 

Or  of  the  old  unhappy  gods; 

Still  like  a  brook  your  page  has  shone, 

And  your  ink  sings  of  Helicon. 


A  Zangwill  Witticism 

By  way  of  anecdote  I  will  repeat  a  little  story 
that  was  going  the  rounds  of  literary  circles  years 
ago.  Andrew  Lang  being  master  of  ceremonies 
on  a  certain  public  occasion  invited  Israel  Zang- 
will to  participate,  suggesting  that  he  give  the 
audience  a  short  talk.  He  received  this  answer: 
If  A.  Lang  will  I.  Zangwill." 


New  Light  on  Oscar  Wilde 

Getting  hold  of  a  suppressed  book  and  reading 
it  arouses  a  special  sort  of  intellectual  excite- 
ment. It  is  much  the  same  sort  of  excitement 
which  a  naughty  monk  must  have  felt  as  he  took 
Boccaccio  from  the  shelf  after  the  Congregation 
of  the  Index  had  thundered  against  the  Decam- 
eron. Somehow  or  other,  it's  like  catmg  stolen 
sweets,  the  difficulty  of  obtaining  the  book  supply- 
ing the  same  zest  that  comes  in  the  other  case 
from  the  danger.  This  is  only  partly  true  of 
Arthur  Ransome's  "Oscar  Wilde."  The  diffi- 
culty of  obtaining  the  book  exists  only  in  Great 
Britain,  not  in  this  country.  Nevertheless,  know- 
ing that  it  was  suppressed  by  its  English  pub- 
lishers, one  naturally  opens  it  with  a  curiosity 
which  is  not  wholly  literary.  The  book  was 
.suppressed  in  London  immediately  after  pub- 
lication, for  the  reason  that  Lord  Alfred  Douglas 
who  had  been  Oscar  Wilde's  pathic  but  who  now 
seems  to  be  rehabilitated  in  the  esteem  of  London 
society,  brought  suit  against  the  publishers  for 
libel.  The  publishers  promptly  withdrew  the 
book.  But  that  did  not  prevent  its  circulation 
in  America;  no  doubt,  if  the  fact  were  better 
known,  it  would  help  the  sale  on  this  side. 
Naturally,  one  turns  over  the  pages  to  find  the 
basis  for  that  libel  suit.  The  name  of  the  de- 
generate son  of  the  Marquis  of  Queensberry  is 
never  once  mentioned  in  the  book.  But  the 
references  to  him  are  so  plain  that  they  cannot 
be  mistaken. 


How  Douglas  Behaved 

Ransome  tells  how,  after  Wilde  was  released 
from  prison,  his  faithful  friends  Robert  Ross  and 
Reginald  Turner  did  all  they  could  to  make  his 
new  start  in  the  world  easy  and  comfortable. 
They  helped  him  to  fit  up  a  chalet  at  Berncval  in 


France.  "He  had  left  prison."  says  Ransome. 
"with  an  improved  physique,  and,  now  that  he 
was  able  to  work,  there  was  hope  that  he  would 
not  risk  the  loss  of  it  by  leaving  tnis  lite  or  com- 
parative simplicity.  Suddenly,  however,  he  flung 
aside  his  plans  and  resolutions,  desperately  ex- 
plaining that  his  folly  was  inevitable.  The  iterated 
entreaty  of  a  man  whose  friendship  had  already 
cost  him  more  than  it  was  worth,  and  a  newly- 
felt  loneliness  at  Berneval,  destroyed  his  resolu- 
tion. He  became  restless  and  went  to  Rouen, 
where  it  rained  and  he  was  miserable;  then  back 
to  Dieppe;  a  few  days  later,  with  his  poem  still 
unfinished,  he  was  in  Naples  sharing  a  momentary 
magnificence  with  the  friend  whose  conduct  he 
had  condemned,  whose  influence  he  had  feared." 
This  friend  was  Lord  Alfred  Douglas,  Wilde's 
evil  spirit.  The  unfinished  poem  was  the  Ballad 
of  Reading  Goal.  "Soon  after  Wilde  left  Berne- 
val for  Naples."  continues  Ransome,  "those  who 
controlled  the  allowance  that  enabled  him  to  live 
with  his  friend  purposely  stopped"  it.  His  friend, 
as  soon  as  there  was  no  money,  left  him.  'It 
was,'  said  Wilde,  'a  most  bitter  experience  in  a 
bitter  life.'"  I  have  read  lengthy  diatribes  on 
Lord  Alfred  Douglas,  but  it  seems  to  me  that 
in  that  one  sentence  about  his  flitting  when 
the  money  was  exhausted,  Ransome  puts  the 
final  odium  on  the  miserable  creature. 


De  Profundis  Emasculated 

In  this  same  connection  the  author  gives  us 
something  new  about  De  Profundis.  He  says 
it  '"is  not  printed  as  it  was  written,  but  is  com- 
posed of  passages  from  a  long  letter  whose  com- 
plete publication  would  be  impossible  in  this 
generation.  The  passages  were  selected  and  put 
together  by  Mr.  Robert  Ross  with  a  skill  that  it 
it  is  impossible  sufficiently  to  admire.  The  letter, 
a  manuscript  of  'eighty  close-written  pages  on 
twenty  folio  sheets,'  was  not  addressed  to  Mr. 
Ross  but  to  a  man  to  whom  Wilde  felt  that  he 
owed  some,  at  least,  of  the  circumstances  of  his 
public  disgrace.  It  was  begun  as  a  rebuke  of  this 
friend,  whose  actions,  even  subsc(|uent  to  the 
trials,  had  been  such  as  to  cause  Wilde  con- 
siderable pain.  It  was  not  delivered  to  him,  but 
given  to  Mr.  Ross  by  Wilde,  who  also  gave  in- 
structions as  to  its  partial  publication.  It  is  not 
often  possible  to  detect  the  original  intention 
of  rebuke  in  the  published  portions  of  De  Pro- 
fundis. I  suppose  that  as  Wilde  pointed  out  his 
friend's  share  in  his  disaster,  and  set  down  on 
paper  what  that  disaster  was,  he  came  to  examine 
its  ulterior  efTect  on  his  own  mind,  for  those 
pages  that  are  open  to  us  contain  such  an  ex- 
amination." 


As  to  Mrs.  Wilde 

Ransome  doesn't  think  much  of  Mrs.  Wildc. 
"Wilde's  marriage,"  he  says,  "was  not  felictous, 
though  he  regretted  it  more  for  his  wife's  sake 
than  for  his  own.  It  is  said  that  Mrs.  Wildc 
was  rather  cruelly  made  to  pose  for  Lady  Henry 
Wotton  in  Dorian  Gray,  that  "curious  woman 
whose  dresses  always  looked  as  if  they  had  been 
designed  in  a  rage  and  put  on  in  a  tempest 
She  tried  to  look  picturesque,  but  only  succeeded 
in  being  untidy.  .    looking  like  a  bird  of 

paradise  that  had  been  out  all  night  in  the  rain.' 
She  was  sentimental,  pretty,  well-meaning  and 
inefficient.  She  would  have  been  very  happy  as 
the  wife  of  an  ornamental  minor  poet,  and  it  is 
possible  that  in  marrying  Wilde  she  mistook 
his  for  such  a  character.  .  .  .  She  became 
more  a  spectacle  for  Wilde  than  an  influence  upon 
him,  and  was  without  the  strength  that  might 
have  prevented  the  disasters  that  were  to  fall 
through  him  on  herself.  She  had  a  passion  for 
leaving  things  alone,  broken  only  by  moments 
of  interference  badly  timed.    She  became  one  of 


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July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


11 


those  women  whose  Christian  names  their  hus- 
bands, without  malice,  preface  with  the  epithets 
'poor  dear.'  Her  married  life  was  no  less  inef- 
fectual than  unhappy."  This  is  rather  hard  on 
the  poor  wife,  though  not  spiteful,  like  the  picture 
which  the  brilliant  woman  who  writes  under  the 
name  of  Frank  Danby  drew  of  her  in  "The 
Sphinx's  Lawyer."  It  is  well  to  remember  that 
Wilde  wrote  of  his  wife  in  De  Profundis:  "My 
wife,  always  kind  and  gentle  to  me,  rather  than 
that  I  should  hear  the  news  (of  his  mother's 
death)  from  indififerent  lips,  traveled,  ill  as  she 
was,  all  the  way  from  Genoa  to  England  to  break 
to  me  herself  the  tidings  of  so  irreparable,  so 
irredeemable,  a  loss." 


Why  Oscar  Came  to  America 

A  thing  not  generally  known  is  the  reason  of 
Wilde's  trip  to  America.  It  was  part  of  a  press 
agent  scheme  to  boost  the  Gilbert-Sullivan  opera 
of  "Patience."  D'Oyly  Carte  wished  to  repeat 
the  London  success  of  the  opera  in  America,  but 
realized  that  Americans  would  miss  much  of  its 
satirical  fun,  not  knowing  the  members  of  the 
esthetic  cult  as  London  knew  them.  So  he  "con- 
ceived the  Napoleonic  scheme  of  sending  over  a 
specimen  aesthete  to  show  what  'Patience'  was 
laughing  at.  This  somewhat  ignominous  position 
was,  with  due  diplomacy,  offered  to  Oscar  Wilde, 
on  account  of  his  extravagance  in  dress,  and 
proudly  accepted  by  him  on  the  wilful  supposition 
that  it  was  a  fitting  tribute  to  his  recently  pub- 
lished poems."  The  fact  is,  Wilde  needed  the 
money. 


When  His  Downfall  Started 

Wilde's  second  son  was  born  in  1886,  two  years 
after  his  marriage.  In  that  year,  Ransome  tells 
us,  he  began  the  course  of  conduct  which  had  be- 
come a  habit  by  1889  and  led  to  his  downfall  in 
1895.  "The  vice  needs  none  but  a  pathological 
explanation.  It  was  a  disease,  a  malady  of  the 
brain,  not  the  necessary  consequence  of  a  delight 
in  classical  literature.  Opulence  permitted  its 
utmost  development,  but  did  not  create  it."  Wilde, 
we  also  learn,  "had  been  in  youth  a  runner  after 
girls,  but,  as  a  man,  he  ceased  to  take  any  in- 
terest in  women.  In  the  moment  of  his  success, 
when  many  were  ready  to  throw  themselves  at 
his  feet,  one,  perhaps,  of  the  reasons  of  his  power 
was  his  own  indifference  to  his  conquests."  There 
are  interesting  details  of  Wilde's  last  days.  While 
he  was  in  Rome  he  became  a  devotee  of  the 
camera,  and  found  great  delight  taking  snapshots. 
"He  was  blessed  by  the  Pope,  not  once  only  but 
seven  times."  Just  before  the  end  in  Paris  he 
took  to  excessive  drinking.  "His  death,"  we 
learn,  "was  hurried  by  his  inability  to  give  up  the 
drinking  to  which  he  had  become  accustomed. 
It  was  directly  due  to  meningitis,  the  legacy  of 
an  attack  of  tertiary  syphilis."  So  Wilde  was  a 
victim  of  the  curse  which  is  supposed  to  have 
blighted  the  lives  of  Schopenhauer,  Nietzsche  and 


other  geniuses.  Ransome's  book  is  most  inter- 
esting. It  .is  full  of  illuminating  criticism  and 
of  arresting  phrases,  as  when  he  calls  Dorian 
Gray  "the  first  French  novel  to  be  written  in 
the  English  language."  Throughout  there  is 
shown  a  necessary  restraint.  The  author  doesn't 
go  into  details  which  might  just  as  well  be  for- 
gotten. The  book  has  nothing  in  common  with 
one  which,  Ransome  says,  is  soon  to  be  pub- 
lished anonymously,  containing  a  full  and  accur- 
ate account  of  the  legal  proceedings  for  and 
against  Wilde.  That  book  will  be  avidly  read, 
but  it  will  serve  no  good  purpose. 


The  Prophet  of  "The  Hour" 

A  new  prophet  has  appeared  in  the  field  of 
journalism.  His  name  is  J.  A.  Kinghorn-Jones. 
The  name  is  more  or  less  familiar  to  newspaper 
readers,  for  Mr.  Kinghorn-Jones  has  been  writ- 
ing letters  to  the  press  for  several  years,  but  as 
his  views  are  somewhat  heterodox  his  letters 
have  frequently  gravitated  to  the  waste-basket 
instead  of  to  the  lineotype.  So  in  order  to  insure 
publicity  for  his  thoughts  Mr.  Kinghorn-Jones 
started  a  paper  which  he  calls  Industrialism,  and 
which  has  for  its  motto,  "Love  one  another  and 
work  out  your  own  salvation."  The  editor's  mis- 
•ion  is  to  show  the  way.  His  purpose  is  to  abol- 
ish wage  slavery,  destroy  usury,  and  win  recogni- 
tion for  one  hour  as  the  scientific  unit  of  value. 
Editor  Kinghorn-Jones  is  an  economist  who  be- 
lieves that  he  has  devised  "the  only  plan  which 
will  allay  the  general  discontent  and  avert  the 
impending,  expected  revolution."  His  plan  is  to 
induce  the  Government  "to  issue  $500,000,000  in 
greenbacks,  make  them  good  for  all  debts  public 
and  private,  for  the  purpose  of  erecting  two  hun- 
dred thousand  homes  at  a  cost  of  $2,500."  These 
homes,  according  to  the  Kinghorn-Jones  plan,  are 
to  be  given  to  workmen,  and  the  homes  are  to 
be  paid  for  at  the  rate  of  $20  per  month  for  ten 
and  a  half  years  at  the  end  of  which  time  the 
deeds  shall  be  delivered  to  the  owners.  Editor 
Kinghorn-Jones  would  also  provide  for  the  spend- 
ing of  the  money  paid  for  homes  for  the  build- 
ing of  more  homes.  It's  a  sort  of  an  endless 
chain  idea.  He  would  make  up  a  nation  of  homes 
— every  man  his  own  landlord.  The  editor  of  In- 
dustrialism is  a  very  earnest  philosopher  with 
faith  in  his  mission  and  contempt  for  most  of 
the  vociferous  reformers  of  the  day.  He  is  far 
and  away  the  most  progressive  man  of  his  day. 
He  regards  such  men  as  Gompers  and  Roosevelt 
as  hopeless  conservatives.  Gompers,  he  says,  is 
satisfied  with  "a  fair  day's  pay  for  a  fair  day's 
work."  This  principle  he  pronounces  reactionary, 
going  back  as  it  does  to  the  New  Testament — 
"The  Laborer  is  worthy  of  his  hire."  The  idea, 
says  the  editor  of  Industrialism,  will  not  bear 

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them. 


discussion  by  honest  folk,  since  "equity  demands 
that  all  the  result  of  a  day's  work  belongs  to 
the  worker:  if  he  or  she  does  not  get  it,  some- 
tliing  is  wrong,  the  worker  has  been  cheated,  and 
only  one  thing  can  remedy  the  evil,  and  that  is 
recognizing  one  hour  as  the  unit  of  value." 


Harry  Goldberg's  Grievance 

Harry  Goldberg  is  a  playwright,  though  he  has 
never  had  the  joy  of  production.  As  a  play- 
wright Harry  takes  himself  very  seriously  around 
the  Olympic  Club,  and  waxes  indignant  when  Tiv 
Kreling  suggests  that  he  is  the  author  of  "Ten 
Nights  in  a  Grocery."  As  a  matter  of  fact 
Harry's  play  is  called  "Roland  of  Rolandseck" 
and  is  full  of  simpering  males  and  affected 
females.  He  was  airing  a  grievance  to  a  group 
of  esthetes  in  the  Olympic  Club  library  the  other 
evening.  "Miss  Helen  Ware,"  he  said,  "may  be 
a  very  charming  woman  and  a  fine  actress,  but 
she  didn't  treat  me  right.  One  night  I  sent  her 
a  box  of  American  beauties  and  a  copy  of  my 
play,  requesting  the  favor  of  an  interview  as  I 
wanted  her  to  star  for  me.  What  was  my  in- 
dignation when  she  turned  me  down!    And  yet 


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Eyes  Cured 

Dr.  Rust,  having  completed  his  studies  in  this 
country,  and  in  order  to  acquire  the  most  skilled 
knowledge  in  the  treatment  of  the  EYE,  recently 
made  a  tour  of  the  world  and  is  especially  qualified 
in  this  line  of  work,  having  studied  in  VIENNA 
under  the  master  minds  of  the  old  world,  has  opened 
a  most  elaborate  and  complete  office  with  all  the 
new  and  modern  appliances,  including  many  pur- 
chased abroad.  Anyone  having  eye  difficulties,  no 
matter  how  many  physicians  or  opticians  failed, 
don't  give  up  until  you  have  had  a  CONSL'LTA- 
TION  AND  THOROUGH  EXAMINATION  WITH 
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HAMMOCKS 

We  have  an  overstock  and  wrill  sacrifice  these 
Hammocks  at  a  very  low  price.  We  are  making  a 
specialty  of  Blue  and  White  Canvas  Striped  Ham- 
mocks at  $1.25  each. 

WEEKS- HOWE- EMERSON  COMPANY 

51  Market  Street      San  Francisco 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


she  must  know  from  reading  'Roland  of  Roland- 
week'  that  it's  a  better  play  than  this  and  this 
and  this."  Whereupon  in  his  most  vehement 
manner  Harry  drew  from  different  pockets  paper- 
bound  copies  of  The  Second  Mrs.  Tanqueray, 
Ghosts  and  Lady  Windermere's  Fan. 


Has  Written  Fielding's  Life 

Out  of  the  University  of  California  there  is 
soon  to  come  a  scholarly  book.  Start  not,  too 
credulous  reader,  I  don't  refer  to  Morse  Stephen's 
History  of  the  Earthquake  and  Fire.  That  work 
is  not  yet  ready.  I  allude  to  a  life  of  Henry 
Fielding,  the  great  creator  of  Tom  Jones,  Joseph 
Andrews  and  poor  broken-nosed  Amelia.  The 
author  is  Fred  Blanchard,  an  instructor  in  Eng- 
lish. Blanchard  is  credited  with  knowing  more 
about  Fielding,  Smollett  and  the  other  novelists 
of  that  period  than  any  other  man  in  the  West. 
At  the  summer  school  he  has  been  lecturing  to 
large  and  interested  classes  on  the  eighteenth 
century  novelists.  Blanchard  graduated  with  the 
class  of  1904  and  bore  the  reputation  even  then 
of  being  a  wizard  on  English  literature.  His 
life  of  Fielding  will  fill  a  long-felt  want.  Watson 
published  a  life  in  1807  and  Lawrence  another  in 
1855.  There  is  a  good  work  on  Fielding  in  the 
Men  tif  Letters  series.  But  an  exhaustive  work 
is  needed,  and  Blanchard  has  produced  it. 


"A  Three  Times  Winner" 

San  Francisco  is  a  long  way  from  being  the 
literary  Nazareth  New  York  once  deemed  it. 
Good  things  come  out  of  her  galore.  For  notable 
only  because  newest  example,  there  are  "The 
Lanagan  Stories,"  three  of  them  taken  by  Col- 
lier's at  one  fell  scoop.  The  man  that  writes 
a  series  of  tales  acceptable  by  the  National  Weekly 
has  proven  himself  capable  of  delivering  the 
goods.  These  Chronicles  of  a  San  Francisco 
Police  Reporter  are  the  work  of  a  young  news- 
paper man  with  a  literary  conscience,  a  native 
tendency  to  artistic  restraint  w'orth  the  cultivat- 
ing, the  gift  of  story-telling,  and  a  determination 
to  make  a  name  for  himself.  That  name,  Edward 
H.  Hurlbut,  it  will  pay  the  mystery-unraveling 
reader  to  gumshoe  through  the  highways  and  by- 
ways of  magazinedom.  To  write  something  good 
and  saleable  is  not  as  easy  as  it  sounds.  To  seek 
art  first  and  then  have  dollars  added  to  you,  to 
write  to  please  yourself  and  succeed  in  pleasing 
editor  and  public,  to  keep  on  friendly  terms  with 
yourself  and  yet  find  a  ready  market:  this  is 
to  do  something  worth  a  man's  while,  and  this 
is  what,  if  I  do  not  miss  my  guess,  Edward  H. 
Hurlbut  has  done  in  The  Lanagan  Stories. 


A  Good  Loser 

Mr.  Hurlbut's  experience  with  Collier's  is  not 
as  common  as  we  could  wish.  We  know  a  young 
man  who  has  done  admittedly  good  work,  lost  and 
laughed.  His  experience  would  make  a  cat 
laugh,  and  he  is  merely  an  unlucky  dog.  We  dis- 
tinctly remember  him  showing  us  a  letter  from 
an  editor  somewhat  to  this  effect:  "You  really 
didn't  expect  us  to  print  this,  did  you?  Why, 
man  dear,  this  is  art.  Should  we  forget  ourselves 
and  pay  you  our  good  money  for  it,  do  you 
imagine  Mrs.  Vast  Majority  would  pay  us  hers? 
Alack  the  day,  she  would  not.  It  is  our  business 
to  know  her,  and  we  know  our  business.    If  you 


can  bring  yourself  to  do  stuff  to  please  her,  send 
it  along.  We  will  be  only  too  happy  to  print 
it  and  pay  for  it.  Hang  it  all,  I'd  like  to  use  that 
story  of  yours!"  This  is  not  the  letter  of  the 
letter,  but  it  is  its  unforgettable  spirit.  "This  is 
art!"  is  no  faint  praise,  but  it  is,  at  times,  damn- 
ing. Times  were  when  we  made  a  nice  distinc- 
tion between  what  was  art  and  what  wasn't,  when 
we  smiled  at  St.  Elmo,  when  the  hack  pocketed 
his  fifty  for  a  penny  dreadful,  and  called  himself 
d — n  lucky,  but  never,  in  his  wildest  cups,  a  literary 
man.  To  call  down  the  critic  of  a  big  daily  for 
not  taking  him  seriously  would  never  occur  to  the 
jokesmith  of  our  school  boy  days.  Fortunes  are 
now  made  every  books-without-end  day  out  of 
stuff  no  better  than  the  old  fifty-dollar  novel  we 
wouldn't  be  found  dead  with  in  our  hands.  There 
is  a  marked  tendency  of  the  times  to  think  that 
the  literary  equivalent  of  much  gold  must  needs 
itself  stand  the  acid  test.  As  a  horrible  example 
of  what  I  mean,  let  me  instance  the  fact  that  Mrs. 


FK.\NK  TKRR.XMORSE  JR. 

;\  young  Californian  with  a  remarkable  tenor  voice  who 
has  mastered  fourteen  roles. 

Vast  Majority  inclines  to  deem  a  Shakespeare 
the  poet  that  brings  home  the  bacon.  Then,  the 
editor,  the  god  of  the  writer's  destiny,  but  withal 
human,  is  minded  to  think  with  Mrs.  V.  M.,  on 
the  side  of  his  bread  and  butter,  to  know  well  as 
the  arbiter  of  less  elegant  things  which  siue  nts 
bread  is  buttered  on,  and  to  be  mignty  caretui 
that  it  doesn't  fall  on  that  unprofitable  side.  To 
paraphrase  Epictetus:  Better  great  art  in  adobe 
cottages  than  small  art  in  brownstone  fronts. 
Best  of  all,  of  course,  the  well  done  well  housed. 
Nothing  is  easier  than  for  the  editor  to  "pass 
up  the  buck"  to  the  business  end,  for  it  to  plead 
the  written  law  of  demand  and  supply;  in  a 
word,  one  needs  be  no  Sherlock  Holmes  to  lay 


the  blame  where  it  belongs,  bring  home  the  crime 
to  the  door  of  the  pot-boilcr-devouring  reader, 
who  doubtless  has  diamonds  and  pearls  but  not 
the  rarer  jewel,  discernment. 


Purely  Personal 

George  Wingfield  lost  ten  thousand  fish  on  his 
Lassen  county  place  the  other  day.  The  dam 
broke,  the  lake  leaked  and  the  fish  sneaked. 

Paul  Cowles.  formerly  of  this  city,  has  been 
promoted  from  the  management  of  the  Associated 
Press  in  Atlanta  to  the  charge  of  the  Central 
division  at  Chicago. 

Burke  Corbet,  attorney  and  president  of  the 
Ingleside  Golf  Club,  showed  versatility  the  other 
day  by  licking  a  husky  who  tried  to  steal  the 
lamp  of  his  motor.  Golfers  at  Ingleside  enjoyea 
the  spectacle  of  Corbet  sitting  on  the  bad  man's 
head. 


A  Tenor  With  a  Future 

Musical  critics  say  that  Frank  Terramorse  Jr  , 
a  native  of  this  city,  is  destined  to  distinguisli 
himself  in  grand  opera.  He  has  a  superb  dram- 
atic voice  of  great  range,  flexibility,  sweetness 
and  volume.  He,  takes  D  flat  with  the  greatest 
ease.  His  teacher  is  the  well  known  Sign<ir 
Wanrell  with  whom  he  has  been  studying  for  the 
past  fifteen  months.  In  that  period,  so  great  is 
his  memory,  he  mastered  the  leading  tenor  roles 
in  "Faust,"  "Traviata,"  "Trovatore,"  "Aida,"  "La 
Giaconda,"  "La  Boheme,"  "Cavalleria  Rusticana," 
"L'.\fricaine,"  "Lucia,"  "Pagliacci,"  "Otello," 
"Rigoletto,"  "Les  Huguenots"  and  "Carmen." 
Terramorse  is  only  twenty-two  years  of  age,  and 
he  is  bubbling  over  with  temperament. 


Older's  Altruria 

.Altruria  is  to  be  established  in  the  hills  beyond 
Los  Gatos  and  the  Altrurians  who  will  there  take 
up  their  abode  and  lead  lives  of  altruistic  beauty 
and  brotherhood  are  led  by  none  other  than  that 
passionate  uplifter  of  his  fellow  men  Fremont 
Older  who  conceived  the  idea  of  the  colony.  A 
tract  of  land  has  been  purchased  and  homes  are 
in  process  of  erection,  I  am  told.  They  are  de- 
signed for  the  use  of  members  of  the  colony 
more  as  retreats  from  the  world  for  periods  of 
rest  and  recuperation,  than  permanent  homes. 
There  the  Altrurians  will  find  the  sympathy  and 
encouragement  necessary  to  their  best  endeavors 
in  uplift  and  will,  I  take  it,  do  better  work  in  up- 
lift than  ever  before  after  sessions  of  the  mutual 
appreciation  society.  The  place  will  be  run  on 
a  co-operative  plan  worked  out  by  Editor  Older. 
Of  the  Altrurians  interested  in  it  I  may  mention 
Lincoln  Steffens,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  Edward 
Russell,  Miss  Helen  Todd  and  Brand  Whitlock. 


As  to  the  Mysterious  "M.  L.  G." 

In  the  early  part  of  the  year  a  book  with  the 
mystifying  title  "To  M.  L.  G."  was  published, 
with  the  intimation  that  it  was  no  work  of  the 
imagination  but  most  distinctly  "a  novel  with  a 
purpose."  The  writer  represented  herself  as  an 
actress  who  had  been  ground  fine  in  the  mills  of 
theatrical  life  and  accepted  all  that  came  to  her 
as  a  matter  of  course.  Having  met  a  British 
army  officer  with  whom  she  fell  in  love  her  eyes 
were  opened  and  she  would  not  consent  to  marry 


Thru  Railroad  Tickets 


Issued  to  All  Parts  of 


PORTLAND 

Sails  12  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $10,  $12,  $15.    2d  class  $6.00. 

The  San  Francisco  and  Portland  S.  S.  Co. 

A.  OTTINGER,  General  Agent. 


United  States,  Canada  and  Mexico 

In  connection  with  These   Magnificent  Passenger  Steamers 

LOS  ANGELES 

Sails  U  a.  m.  every  fifth  day.    1st  class  $8.35.      2d  class  $5.35. 

Ticket  Office,  722  Market.    Phone  Sutter  2344 
8    East    Street,    opp.    Ferry    Building.    Phone    Sutter  24  82 
Uerkeley     Office,    2105     Shattuck.       Phone     Berkeley  331 


July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


13 


him  until  he  knew  all  of  her  past  life  in  minutest 
detail,  but  in  order  to  make  her  confession  and 
at  the  same  time  leave  him  free  from  any  de- 
mands on  his  chivalry  she  decided  to  write  the 
book,  trusting  that  a  copy  would  fall  into  his 
hands  and  reading,  he  would  understand.  If  he 
could  condone  and  ignore,  he  would  seek  her  out, 
and  if  not  they  would  go  their  several  ways  keep- 
ing up  the  fiction  of  silence.  The  story  was 
evidently  written  by  some  one  who  knew  more 
of  stage  life  than  is  picked  up  at  random,  and 
it  has  been  variously  attributed  to  nearly  every 
actor  and  author  of  prominence  in  both  England 
and  America,  and,  it  need  not  be  said,  the  book 
has  been  a  best-seller  in  consequence.  Now 
comes  a  postscript  to  the  effect  that  the  bullet 
has  found  it  billet.  The  love-lorn  army  man  read 
first  the  reviews  and  then  the  book,  and  has  done 
all  that  could  be  expected  of  him.  The  wedding 
is  set  for  October  8,  but  it  is  to  be  noted  that 
the  names  of  the  high  contracting  parties  are 
still  withheld.  To  a  generation  which  still  re- 
members the  excitement  that  was  worked  up  over 
"An  Englishwoman's  Love  Letters,"  and  the  dis- 
cussions of  the  whys  and  wherefores  that  led 
to  the  sorrowful  separation — only  to  have  a  sub- 
sequent edition  brought  out  with  the  author's 
name  displayed  on  the  title  page,  the  identity  of 
"M.  L.  G."  and  the  lady  in  the  case  ought  scarcely 
to  be  of  great  importance.  There  was  that 
"Manuscript  in  a  Red  Box"  too,  an  alleged  mas- 
terpiece which  was  left  by  an  unknown  at  a 
prominent  publisher's  office,  with  neither  title 
to  the  tale  nor  clue  to  the  author,  but  which  was 
quite  too  good  to  be  lost  to  humanity,  so  it  was 
given  to  the  world  under  that  vague  title  in  the 
hope  that  its  author  would  be  discovered.  When 
Upton  Sinclair  decided  that  he  was  a  genius  and 
tried  to  convince  the  world  with  his  "Journal  of 


Arthur  Sterling,"  he  went  to  the  length  of  having 
a  fictitious  death  notice  inserted  in  some  of  the 
New  York  papers.  In  fact,  the  dodge  of  work- 
ing on  the  susceptibility  of  the  sentimentalists 
has  been  tried  so  often  and  the  real  biographies 
and  autobiographies  are  so  manipulated  that  it 
takes  extraordinary  credulity  to  be  interested  for 
more  than  a  passing  moment. 


Varied  Types 

(Continued  from  Page  5.) 
Professor    Eberhardt,   the   violinist,    Wilfred  de 
Fonvielle,    the    friend    of    Gambetta,  Jefferson 
Coolidge,  and  many  others. 

One  picture  she  showed  me  was  of  particular 
interest.  It  is  called  "Old  Recollections"  and 
contains  the  figure  of  an  old  peasant  woman. 

"That  old  woman,"  Miss  Klumpke  explained, 
"worked  for  Millet  at  Barbizon  when  she  was 
younger.  She  posed  for  'The  Angelus.'  Her 
daughter  did  my  washing.  The  picture  was 
bought  by  Mrs.  William  Thaw,  the  mother  of 
Harry  Thaw,  who  has  been  a  kind  friend  to  me." 

Miss  Klumpke  has  painted  many  wonderful 
portraits  of  old  people. 

"I  think  there  is  something  very  beautiful  in 
old  age,"  she  said. 

And  so  she  is  going  to  paint  the  portrait  of  her 
aged  father  whose  splendid  head  with  its  long 
white  locks  would  be  an  inspiration  to  any  ar- 
tist. But  in  Miss  Klumpke's  picture  there  will  be 
a  great  deal  more  than  the  mere  inspiration  of 
art. 


Knicker — Look  how  many  circles  a  stone  can 
make. 

Bocker — Especially  if  you  give  it  to  more 
tlian  one  girl. 


In  the  Social  Spotlight 

Frederico  Arce,  Mexico's  Consular  attache  at 
Tokio,  stopped  at  the  Hotel  Victoria  during  the 
week,  en  route  to  his  home  in  Mexico.  Senor 
Arce  returns  to  Mexico  on  official  business.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  R.  M.  Catlin,  Miss  B.  M.  Catlin,  Miss 
M.  H.  Catlin  and  R.  M.  Catlin  Jr.,  are  a  party  of 
New  Jersey  people  registered  at  the  Victoria.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  C.  E.  Ellicott  of  Baltimore,  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  John  H,  Hall  of  Cincinatti  are  at  the  hotel 
during  a  stay  in  town.  Dr.  Sophia  Morgenthaler 
and  Miss  Rose  Morgenthaler  are  at  the  Victoria 
from  Auburndale,  Mass.  Other  arrivals  include 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  O.  Bracken,  San  Francisco;  Mrs. 
M.  B.  Harris  and  Miss  M.  Harris,  Fresno;  J. 
Park  McDougall,  M.  D.,  Los  Angeles;  Mrs.  A.  J. 
Gorham  and  Mrs.  C.  H.  McMahon,  Salt  Lake; 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  A.  Thompson,  Miss  Florence 
Thompson  of  Los  Angeles,  F.  H.  Thompson  of 
Manila;  Mrs.  Isaac  Bird,  Miss  Henrietta  Bird, 
Mrs.  B.  B.  Dixon  and  Victor  Dixon  of  Merced. 

Mrs.  William  Whitman  of  Brookline,  Mass., 
with  her  maid,  Mrs.  Mary  Bullard  and  Miss 
Bullard  left  San  Mateo  immediately  after  the 
Whitman-Crocker  wedding,  going  to  Del  Monte. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Chas.  B.  Alexander,  Miss  Harriet, 
Miss  Jeannette,  Miss  Mary  Crocker  Alexander, 
Miss  M.  P.  Luce  and  Miss  Edith  Chesebrough 
arrived  late  in  the  week,  and  while  it  is  only  a 
preliminary  visit  to  their  more  extended  stay  in 
August,  the  young  ladies  are  enjoying  the  new 
golf  course  hugely.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jerome  Hart, 
as  well  known  in  San  Francisco  as  in  'Weywolde,' 
San  Jose,  will  remain  several  weeks.  Mr.  Pedar 
Bruguiere  arrived  Thursday,  joining  his  wife  and 
small  daughter.  Mrs.  O.  A.  Robertson,  son  and 
daughter,  are  among  the  members  of  the  San 
Francisco  colony  who  motor  about  the  peninsula 
every  day,  and  Mr.  O.  A.  Robertson  was  at  Del 
Monte  for  a  week-end  visit.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  R.  Y. 
Hayne  of  San  Mateo  with  Mr.  John  Parrott  are 
"camping  along  the  line  of  battle"  for  a  few  days, 
and  expect  to  be  in  the  front  ranks  in  September. 
They  made  the  trip  by  motor.  Mr.  Leon  Roos 
motored  down  Saturday  to  join  Mrs.  Roos  and 
Miss  S.  Beinenfeld.  Other  week-end  travelers 
were  Morris  Meyerfeld  and  Albert  Baruch.  Emil 
Greenbaum  joined  his  mother  who  is  enjoying 
Del  Monte. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  W.  C.  Dallas  and  family  of  Mer- 
ced are  at  the  Casa  del  Rey.  Mr.  Dallas  is  a  well 
known  real  estate  man.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  W. 
Morgan  and  Miss  Eleanor  Morgan,  prominent 
San  Franciscans,  are  also  at  the  Casa  del  Rey. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roy  Pike  of  Reno  and  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
O.  R.  Morgan  of  the  same  place,  motored  down 
from  San  Francisco.  Mrs.  J.  P.  Sargent  and  Miss 
Sargent  of  Sargent's  are  at  the  Casa  del  Rey  for 
an  extended  stay.  Mrs.  Sargent  is  the  mother  of 
Mrs.  H.  F.  Anderson,  who  is  prominent  in  the 
social  life  of  Santa  Cruz.  Mrs.  Robert  Tibbetts, 
Miss  N.  F.  Wilson  and  Miss  Sonia  Rarvard  motor- 
ed over  from  Los  Gatos  for  the  week-end.  Among 
the  many  navy  people  who  are  making  the  Casa 
del  Rey  their  headquarters  for  the  Water  Pa- 
geant are  Asst.  Pay  Master  Arthur  Middleton  of 
the  S.  S.  "Denver,"  and  his  wife;  Ensign  Edwin 
Guthrie  and  wife  of  the  U.  S.  "Denver,"  and  Asst. 
Surgeon  C.  B.  Camerer  and  wife. 

Among  the  bathers  at  Paso  Robles  may  be 
mentioned  Mr.  W.  F.  Weiss  of  Grand  Canyon, 
Arizona,  who  like  many  another  has  in  previous 
visits  realized  the  value  of  the  baths  for  his 
rheumatic  tendency  and  is  back  again  for  another 
scries  before  the  strenuous  winter  season 
begins.  Mr.  Weiss  is  connected  with  the  famous 
El  Tovar,  one  of  the  prize  hotels  of  the  Harvey 
System.  Judge  M.  H.  Hyland,  with  Mrs.  Hyland, 
went  down  from  San  Francisco  for  a  leisurely 
siininur  visit  at  Paso  Robles,  and  is  indulging  in 
various  baths  to  his  great  comfort  and  pleasure. 


''The  Best  Automobile  Oil  That  is  Made" 

Zerolene  leaves  no  carbon,  and  gives  full,  uniform  lubrication  at  any  speed  and 
in  any  climate. 

Zerolene  is  sold  in  one-half,  one  and  five  gallon  cans — the  small  cans,  flat  shape, 
just  fit  in  the  tool  box. 

Insist  on  getting  Zerolene  in  the  original  packages.    For  sale  everywhere. 

Standard  Oil  Company 

(Incorporated) 

San  Francisco.  Cal.     San  Jose,  Cal.  Marysville,  Cal.  Portland,  Ore.  Seattle,  Wash. 

Los  Angeles.  Cal,       Stockton,  Cal,  Fresno,  Cal.  Nome,  Alaska  Spokane,  Wash. 

San  Diego,  Cal,  Sacramento,  Cal.         Oakland.   Cal.  Honolulu,  T,  H.  Tacoma.  Wash. 


14 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27.  1912 


A  Waiter's  Lamentation 

This  is  the  story  of  a  plot  that  failed.  But  the 
plot  was  a  perfectly  good  plot,  so  the  story  is 
worth  recording.  The  story  begins  at  the  Bur- 
lingamc  Country  Club  where  a  waiter  is  wring- 
ing his  hands  and  giving  other  outward  signs 
of  extreme  mental  perturbation.  The  waiter 
hasn't  dropped  any  dishes  or  spilled  a  gin  fizz  on 
anybody.  He  is  perturbed  because  he  is  needed 
at  the  Crocker-Whitman  wedding  breakfast,  and 
he  doesn't  know  how  to  get  there  in  time  to  lend 
his  aid.  For  some  reason  or  other  he  has  been 
left  behind.  And  it's  as  much  as  his  waiter's  job 
is  worth  to  miss  the  breakfast.  While  he  is  la- 
menting his  predicament,  Jack  Densham,  reporter, 
and  Carl  Wallen,  photographer  for  the  Exam- 
iner, appear  on  the  scene  in  a  big  automobile. 
They  have  been  detailed  to  attend  the  wedding, 
and  have  already  looked  it  over  a  bit.  But  Wal- 
len's  efTorts  to  get  photographs  have  all  been  in 
vain.  Densham  and  Wallen  are  racking  their 
brains  for  some  way  to  outwit  the  detectives  and 
snap  the  members  of  the  bridal  party.  They  see 
the  waiter,  learn  the  cause  of  his  lamentations 
and  immediately  form  a  brilliant  plot. 


A  Photographer  in  Disguise 

"Come  with  us.  We'll  take  you  to  the  wedding." 
No  sooner  said  than  done.  The  waiter,  greatly 
relieved,  jumps  into  the  machine  and  the  driver 
whirls  off  to  the  Crocker  place.  Just  before 
they  approach  the  police  lines  Wallen  the  photo- 
grapher deftly  plucks  off  the  waiter's  coat  and  the 
waiter's  cap  and  disguises  himself  in  them.  He 
jumps  from  the  machine.  Before  the  real  waiter 
can  protest  he  is  being  driven  back  to  the  Bur- 
lingame  Country  Club.  Wallen  in  the  coat  and 
cap  of  a  waiter  easily  passes  the  scrutiny  of  the 
detectives.  Trying  to  behave  as  much  like  a 
waiter  as  possible  he  hurries  over  the  lawn. 
His  little  pocket  camera  is  ready.  He  chuckles 
to  himself  as  he  thinks  of  the  cameramen  from 
the  other  papers  who  are  ever  and  anon  darting 
out  of  the  urush  like  quails  and  snapping  their 
cameras,  only  to  be  driven  back  by  the  police. 
He  feels  himself  the  master  of  the  situation.  But 
just  as  he  is  about  to  take  his  first  picture,  a 
member  of  the  wedding  party  recognizes  him; 
has  seen  him  taking  golf  pictures  at  the  country 
club.  "This  man  is  not  a  waiter,  he  is  a  photo- 
grapher," says  the  wedding  guest  dramatically. 
And  immediately  a  couple  of  cops  hustle  Wallen 
off  the  sacred  preserves. 


The  Wine  Did  Not  Flow 

There  was  very  little  champagne  at  the  Crocker- 
Whitman  wedding.  The  glasses  were  filled  once 
for  the  toast  to  the  bride.  That  was  all.  Even 
the  best  man  liad  to  make  special  efforts  to  get 
his  glass  filled  a  second  time.  Of  course  this 
was  not  parsimony.  It  was  Jennie  Crocker's 
good  sense.     She  has  been  to  many  weddings. 


LUCERNE  APARTMENTS 

766  SUTTER  STREET,  near  Jones 
JUST  OPENED 

Elegant  sunny   2,   3,  4  and   S-room   apartments  with 
complete  service.    Furnished  or  unfurnished. 

Telephone  Franklin  7866 


Social  Prattle 

By  TANTALUS 

and  knows  the  danger  of  wine  on  such  festive 
occasions.    So  she  didn't  take  any  chances. 


Their  Car  Broke  Down 

Many  of  Miss  Enid  Gregg's  friends  wondered 
why  she  was  absent  from  the  Crocker-Whitman 
wedding.  They  knew  that  both  Enid  and  her 
sister  Ethel  intended  to  appear  in  rare  creations 
of  the  modiste's  art  which  they  had  purchased  in 
Paris.  But  dashing  Enid  and  pretty  Ethel  were 
not  there.  It  seems  that  Mrs.  Gregg  and  her 
charming  daughters  started  for  the  wedding  at 
ten  in  the  morning.  Their  limousine  broke  down 
twice  and  at  three  in  the  afternoon  the  Greggs 
in  desperation  took  the  electric  car  home.  Natur- 
ally they  were  greatly  disappointed  at  their  ill 
luck. 


Mrs.  Alexander's  Thoughtfulness 

One  fine  trait  in  Mrs.  Alexander's  (Hattie 
Crocker's),  character  is  her  great  loyalty  to  her 

old  time  friends,  especially  to  those  less  fortunate 


Photo,   H.    I'ierre  Smith 


MISS  K.\TIE   BELLE  McGREGOK 

The    accomplished    daughter   of   the    President    of  the 
L'nion  Iron  Works.    She  graduated  this  year  from 
Vassar  and   will  make  her  debut  this  winter. 

than  herself.  One  friend  in  Sacramento  recently 
had  the  mortgage  on  her  home  paid  off  by  Mrs. 
Alexander.  Of  all  the  guests  at  the  Crocker- 
Whitman  wedding  there  was  one  who  probably 
will  never  forget  the  joyous  day.  She  was  an 
early  girlhood  friend  of  Hattie  Crocker  Alexan- 
der's, and  is  now  living  way  down  in  the  country 
far  removed  from  pleasures  and  festivities  of  any 
kind.  Mrs.  Alexander  sent  for  her,  made  it  pos- 
sible for  her  to  appear  at  the  wedding  and  saw 
to  it  that  she  thoroughly  enjoyed  the  day.  I 
have  heard  of  many  other  acts  of  thoughtful 
kindness  on  the  part  of  Mrs.  Alexander,  but  as 
Mrs.  Alexander  is  exceedingly  unobtrusive  in  her 
charities  I  can  but  hint  at  them  in  deference  to 
her  wishes. 


Another  Simple  Wedding 

The  "note  of  simplicity"  which  is  insisted  on 
these  days  in  all  real  society  weddings  was  struck 
with  a  resounding  whack  at  the  wedding  of  Miss 
Thclma  Parker  of  Honolulu  and  Henry  Gailiard 


Smart  of  Virginia.  Miss  Parker  is  an  heiress  with 
an  astounding  income,  so  the  note  of  simplicity 
was  struck  on  a  golden  scale.  The  wedding  took 
place  amid  the  simple  surroundings  of  Miss 
Parker's  plantation  at  Waimca  on  the  island.  A 
Kanaka  orchestra,  simply  attired  in  garlands  of 
leis  and  native  costumes  containing  all  the  prim- 
ary colors,  played  simple  Hawaiian  melodies. 
At  the  same  time  a  bevy  of  dusky  beauties,  more 
simply  attired  still,  gyrated  in  the  simple,  the  ex- 
cessively simple  contortions  of  the  pretty  hula- 
hula  which  is  the  national  wedding  dance  of  the 
islands.  Then  there  was  a  luau  or  wedding  feast, 
at  which  the  hundreds  of  wedding  guests  partook 
of  a  simple  repast  consisting  of  innumerable 
Hawaiian  viands.  After  the  honeymoon  the 
couple  will  divide  their  time  between  a  simple 
mansion  in  San  Francisco  and  an  equally  simple 
home  in  Honolulu,  both  specially  built  for  them 
at  a  cost  running  simply  into  six  figures. 


Miss  Langhorne's  Wedding 

Miss  Julia  Langhorne  has  selected  the  dashing 
Miss  Newhall  to  be  maid  of  honor  at  her  mar- 
riage to  Lieutenant  Parker  next  month.  Miss 
Newhall  is  nearly  as  tall  as  the  lithe  Miss  Lang- 
horne and  they  will  tower  above  the  bridesmaids 
following  behind,  although  Miss  Sara  Cunning- 
ham and  Miss  Louise  Boyd  who  will  fill  the  role 
of  bridesmaids  are  above  the  average  height.  It 
will  be  a  very  impressive  and  stately  bridal  party 
at  St.  Luke's  on  the  evening  of  August  14,  with 
the  groom  measuring  six  feet,  three  inches,  fall- 
ing just  one  inch  below  the  height  of  Malcolm 
Whitman.  There  will  not  be  the  striking  differ- 
ence, however,  between  bride  and  groom  that  was 
noted  at  the  Crocker-Whitman  wedding  where 
the  dainty  bride  who  stood  five  feet  one  in  her 
slippers  was  fifteen  inches  below  the  groom's 
six  feet  four.  Miss  Langhorne  herself  is  sfx 
feet  tall.  The  winsome  bride  elect  is  greatly  dis- 
appointed, I  hear,  that  her  intimate  friend 
Martha  Calhoun  will  not  be  among  her  attend- 


MANZANITA  HALL 

PALO  ALTO.  CALIFORNIA 
Makes  a  specialty  of  preparing  boys  and  young 
men  for  entrance  to  the  universities.  The  location 
adjacent  to  Stanford  University  and  to  Palo  Alto, 
a  town  of  remarkable  culture,  makes  possible  a  school 
life  of  unusual  advantages  and  privileges. 

Twentieth    year    opens     August     27,     1912.  For 
catalogue  and  specific  information,  address 
W.  A.  SHEDD,  Head  Master 


Puckett's  College  of  Dancing 

Assembly  Hall 


1268  SUTTER  STREET 

between  Van  Neu  and  Polk 

yl  ^ore  beautiful  ballroom 
Could    Hardly  Conceded 


Classes — Mondays.         .Assemblies — Fridtys 
Advance  Class  and  Social— Wednesdays. 

Privat*  Laaiona 

Hall  for  Rent  Phone  Franklin  118 


July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


ants.  Miss  Calhoun  is  as  petite  and  dainty  as  Jennie 
Crocker  Whitman  and  her  presence  in  the  bridal 
party  would  have  necessitated  another  small  maid 
to  match  her  height.  Miss  Katherine  Duane  of 
Morristown,  New  Jersey,  cousin  to  Miss  Lang- 
horne,  is  another  who  had  been  originally  in- 
cluded in  the  bridesmaids  but  will  not  take  the 
journey  to  California  after  all.  The  Duanes  are 
very  prominent  in  the  exclusive  Morristown  set 
and  Miss  Katherine  was  much  entertained  by  our 
smart-setters  on  the  occasion  of  a  visit  to  the 
Langhornes  several  years  ago. 


Two  Young  Catches 

The  youthful  Prince  Stanislaus  Poniatowski 
who  is  visiting  his  aunt  Mrs.  Will  Crocker  at 
Burlingame  is  too  young  to  be  considered  a 
matrimonial  possibility  by  belles  down  the  penin- 
sula. He  is  not  yet  fifteen  years  old  but  is  a 
handsome  sturdy  lad  of  whom  the  mothers  of 
future  debutantes  are  taking  note.  He  is  seen 
driving  about  the  roads  of  Burlingame  with  his 
young  cousin,  Billy  Crocker  Jr.  who  himself  will 
be  a  great  catch  in  a  few  years.  Young  Crocker 
!3  a  motor  maniac  whose  father  presented  him 
with  a  machine  when  he  returned  East  to  school 
!ast  year.  He  is  soon  to  enter  Yale  University. 
Prince  Stanislaus  who  is  one  of  three  brothers 
will  spend  the  remainder  of  the  summer  with  his 
California  relatives.  I  am  told  he  is  preparing 
to  enter  an  American  university  to  complete  his 
education. 


The  Crockers  Assembled 

There  is  quite  a  gathering  of  the  rising  gen- 
eration of  the  Crocker  clan  at  Burlingame  this 
summer.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Alexander  of  New  York 
brought  their  three  daughters  out  for  the  Whit- 
n.an    wedding.    They   are   Harriet,   Janetta  and 


OUT-OF-DOORS  OUTFITTERS 

Women's  Sweater  Coats,  $1.45,  $2.75,  $3.00, 
$3.75,  $4.75,  $5.00,  $6.00,  $6.50,  $7.00,  $7.50, 
$8.00,  $8.50,  $9.00,  $9.50,  $10.00,  $10.50, 
$16.00  to  $25.00. 

YOU  KNOW  OUR  QUALITIES 
Exclusive  novelties  and  original  crea- 
tions in  Sv^eater  Coats,  Knitted  Blazer 
Coats,  Stylish  Bathing  Suits,  Hygienic 
Knitted  Underwear,  Dependable  Hos- 
ery,  etc. 


May,  the  last  not  yet  numbered  among  the 
debutantes.  The  son  and  two  daughters  of  the 
Will  Crockers  are  all  at  New  Place  where  an- 
other season  or  two  will  see  Helen,  the  younger 
girl,  a  debutante.  The  Henry  Crocker  children 
went  down  for  the  wedding  and  young  Frank 
Crocker,  a  cousin  from  New  York,  is  also  visit- 
ing at  Burlingame.  The  Prince  may  be  included 
by  virtue  of  his  relationship  to  Mrs.  Will  Crocker, 
the  sister  of  his  mother  Princess  Poniatowski. 


Mrs.  Carolan's  Latest 

Mrs.  Carolan  has  been  playing  in  Paris  with 
a  new  fad.  She's  studying  Apache  slang.  That's 
the  thing  to  do  in  Paris  just  now,  and  Mrs.  Caro- 


Plioto,  Bianca  Conti 

MRS.   WILL.-VRD  WILLIAMSON 

W  ho  is  prominent  in  the  exclusive  set  of  Oakland  and 
does   a   great   deal   of  entertaining   in  her 
Hillside  avenue  home. 

Ian  is  always  au  courant  with  the  times,  as  the 
American  says  on  the  boulevards.  The  argot  of 
the  slums  is  heard  in  the  best  drawing  rooms, 
bandied  to  and  fro  over  the  best  tea  tables.  Slang 
dictionaries  are  in  demand.  Language  teachers 
are  giving  lessons  at  exorbitant  prices  per  lesson. 
The  Parisian  interest  in  the  under-world,  always 
strong  since  Hugo  wrote  "Les  Miserables,"  was 
intensified  by  the  exploits  of  the  motor  bandits. 
That  led  to  the  fad  of  Apache  talk.  Mrs.  Caro- 
lan, they  tell  me,  is  an  expert  at  it.  But  of  course 
there  are  some  Apache  terms  which  she  doesn't 
use. 


GRANT  AVLAT  POST  ST. 


Tweedmouth  in  the  Lists 

Walter  Hobart,  Tom  Driscoll,  Dick  Tobin  and 
others  in  Burlingame  will  be  sorry  to  hear  that 
"Tweedy"  is  a  mighty  poor  tilter.  "Tweedy"  is 
a  gallant  and  expert  polo  player,  as  we  all  know, 
but  he  doesn't  shine  in  the  lists.  "Tweedy,"  to 
give  Lord  Tweedmouth  the  nickname  by  which 
Eleanor  Sears  always  called  him  at  Coronado. 
took  part  in  the  tournament  at  Earl's  Court, 
London,  a  few  days  ago.  The  tournament  was  the 
piece  de  resistance  of  Mrs.  Cornwallis-Wcsrs 
spectacle,  "Shakespeare's  England,"  the  same  that 
she  is  thinking  of  bringing  to  San  Francisco  for 
the  World's  Fair.  Other  lords  took  part,  notably 
the  Duke  of  Marlborough,  Lord  Ashby  St.  Leger, 
the  Earl  of  Craven  and  Viscount  Crichton.  But 
the  few  San  Franciscans  who  were  present  as 

City  Candy  in  the  Country.  Specially  packed 
for  sending  by  mail  or  express.  Can  be  sent 
from  any  of  Geo.  Haas  &  Sons'  four  candy  stores 
in  San  Francisco. 


spectators  were  most  interested  in  "Tweedy." 
"Tweedy"  looked  funny  in  armor.  He  resembled 
;i  cross-section  of  a  boiler  factory  as  much  as 
anything  else.  Some  say  he  wore  a  ton  of  metal, 
Init  that's  an  exaggeration.  He  was  very  hot, 
and  complained  that  he  couldn't  wipe  away  the 
perspiration  which  trickled  down  his  face  and 
tickled  his  chin.  And  he  spoiled  the  historical 
effect  by  smoking  a  cigarette  through  a  long 
tube.  He  wasn't  happy,  and  the  actual  tilting 
completed  his  misery.  He  couldn't  have  tilted 
worse  if  he  tried.  His  lance-in-rest  missed  his 
opponent  every  time.  His  horse  stumbled,  un- 
i  sed  to  the  tonnage,  and  didn't  want  to  carry  him. 
No,  "Tweedy''  was  not  a  success.  Walter  Hobart, 
Tom  Dris.coll,  Dick  Tobin  and  the  rest  should 
cable  their  sorrow.    But  perhaps  Walter  Hobart 


Any  Victrola 

On  Easy  Terms 

Whether  you  get  the  new  low  price 
Victrola  at  $15  or  the  Victrola  "de  luxe"  at 
$200,  get  a  Victrola.  At  a  very  small  ex- 
pense you  can  enjoy  a  world  of  entertain- 
ment. Victrolas  $15  to  $200.  Any  Victrola 
on  easy  terms. 

Sherman  liiay  &  Go. 


Steinway  and  Other  Pianos  Apollo  and  CecUian  Player  Pianos 
Victor  Talking  Machines    Sheet  Music  and  Musical  Merchandise 

Kearny  and  Sutter  Street*,  San  Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  Streets,  Oakland 


(  Sutter  1572 
Phones    Home  C-3970 

(  Home  C-4781— Hotel 


Cyril  Arnautou 
Henry  Rittman 
C.  Lahademc 


New  Delmonico's 

Restaurant  and  Hotel 

NOW  OPEN 

Beat  French  Dinner  in  the  City  with  W ine,  $  1 .00 
Banquet  Halls  and  Private  "Dining  Rooms 
Music  Every  Evening 
Visi.ors  lo  San  Francisco  are  cordially  invited 

362  Geary  Street        San  Francisco 


FIOR  d'lTALIA 

RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN  DINNER  A  SPECIALTY 

The  cuisine  is  unsurpassed.    An  ideal  place 
where  one  can  take  his  family  or  friends. 
Banquet  Rooms  and  Private  Rooms 

492  BROADWAY  ::  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phonei:  Douglas  1504         Home  C  15C4 


Art  and  Refinement  are  Display  by  Tasteful  Attire 


Phone  Douglas  4964 


Makers  o£ 

LADIES'   GOWNS  AND   FANCY  COSTUMES 
420  SUTTER,  near  STOCKTON  STREET 

San  Francisco,  Cal.   


16 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27.  1912 


will  be  secretly  delighted.  If  "Tweedy"  hadn't 
walked  upstairs  on  his  handi  in  Coronado  Walter 
would  have  been  spared  humiliation  and  sprains. 


The  automobile  that  is  to  be  given  away  is  cer- 
tainly a  beauty  and  one  that  any  woman  would 
be  proud  to  own. 


To  Have  a  Bachelor  Establishment 

Loring  Pickering,  the  young  man  who  will  one 
day  control  the  fortunes  of  the  Bulletin,  is  hav- 
ing the  time  of  his  life  in  Europe.  He  went 
abroad  for  study  and  recreation,  and  will  prob- 
ably matriculate  at  the  Paris  Sorbonne.  But 
Pickering  is  in  no  hurry  to  buckle  down  to  the 
grind.  Europe  has  so  many  attractions  for  a 
young  man  with  a  handsome  income,  tTiat  it  is 
but  natural  the  Sorbonne  should  wait  a  little. 
He  has  been  spending  a  good  deal  of  time  in 
Florence,  Siena  and  San  Remo  and  at  last  re- 
ports was  seeing  Rome  and  doing  as  the  Romans 
do,  which  means  that  he  was  having  a  good  time. 
Incidentally  he  went  to  Viterbo  to  see  the  Cam- 
orra  criminals  sentenced.  In  the  Autunw  he  will 
go  back  to  Paris.  He  intends  to  set  up  a  bachelor 
establishment  there  and  enter  into  the  gay  Win- 
ter festivities  of  the  American  set.  And  he  will 
try  to  see  something  of  the  Paris  capital  from 
the  inside. 


An  Interesting  Engagement 

Society  circles  about  the  bay  are  showering 
congratulations  upon  Mrs.  Doris  Hopkins  since 
she  has  made  public  the  announcement  of  her 
engagement  to  M.  Marcel,  a  popular  and  wealthy 
member  of  Paris  society.  Close  friends  have 
known  of  her  happiness  ever  since  Mrs.  Hopkins 
came  from  France  to  visit  Mrs.  Edward  Lacy 
Brayton  of  Kelton  Court,  Oakland,  but  it  is  only 
in  recent  weeks  that  transbay  society  in  general 
has  been  made  acquainted  with  the  news  of  the 
approaching  marriage  which  will  occur  early  next 
year.  Possessed  of  infinite  tact  and  graciousness, 
Mrs.  Hopkins  has  been  extremely  popular  with 
the  Claremont  Country  Club  set  and  her  Novem- 
ber departure  for  Paris  will  be  deeply  deplored. 


Honeymooners  North  and  South 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irwin  Brought<m,  bride  and 
groom  of  the  week  are  on  their  way  to  Canada 
to  spend  the  honeymoon  at  Banff.  This  is  revers- 
ing the  direction  for  wedding  trips  generally 
lead  southward.  Santa  Barbara  is  becoming  as  fam- 
ous for  honeymooners  as  was  Niagara  in  the  days 
of  Artcmus  Ward  and  Mark  Twain's  early  efforts. 
A  few  years  ago  Del  Monte  was  favored  by 
brides  and  grooms,  of  whom  it  was  said  ninety- 
eight  per  cent  of  those  married  in  this  city  spent 
their  honeymoon  at  the  famous  hostlery.  A 
goodly  number  still  find  their  way  there,  but  gen- 
erally continue  on  to  the  old  southern  mission 
town  after  a  brief  stay.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Williams, 
the  latter  of  whom  was  Mrs.  Nelle  Towlc,  her 
former  husband  having  been  a  Towle  of  Towle's 
station,  are  among  those  at  present  honeymooning 
in  the  South  but  the  bride  has  introduced  the  nov- 
elty into  the  trip  of  driving  her  own  automobile 
on  the  wedding  journey. 


'"Tween  the  Hours  of  3  and  6" 

The  interior  of  Tait's  Cafe  presents  a  gay  and 
animated  appearance  these  days  "'tween  the  hours 
of  3  and  6  o'clock."  During  these  hours  fashion- 
able and  Bohemian  San  Francisco  gathers  to  make 
merry  and  to  enjoy  a  light  repast.  The  "atmos- 
phere" of  the  place  is  very  compelling;  and  the 
impression  made  is  a  pleasant  one.  There's  a 
young,  petite  Chinese  girl  who  goes  from  table 
to  table  in  native  attire  giving  out  neat  little 
announcement  cards  which  bear  the  interesting 
information  that  the  cafe  is  going  to  give  away 
a  beautiful  $1250  Oakland  automobile — the  prize 
car.  This  young  Chinese  lady  speaks  very  good 
English  and  affords  patrons  of  the  place  much 
amusement  by  her  quaint  replies  to  questions 
asked  as  she  moves  among  the  merrymakers. 


Nicholas  I.  and  Liszt 

At  a  fete  given  in  Liszt's  honor  before  the  Rus- 
sian court,  Nicolas  I.  requested  the  eminent  artist 
to  play  something.  The  latter  at  once  sat  down 
before  the  piano  and  began  to  play.  While  he 
was  playing  he  accidentally  caught  sight  of  the 


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Latest  types  of  Steel  Coaches,  Dining,  Obser- 
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Tsar,  who  was  not  listening  to  the  music,  but 
talking  to  a  general.  Liszt  continued  to  play  and 
Nicolas  continued  to  talk.  Then  Liszt  stopped 
abruptly.  All  those  present  stared  at  each  other 
in  confusion  while  the  Emperor  went  up  to  Liszt, 
asking  what  had  happened. 

"When  the  Emperor  talks,"  answered  Liszt, 
"everybody  else  must  be  silent." 

"But  when  Liszt  plays  the  Emperor  must  be 
silent,"  answered  Nicolas,  and  began  to  listen 
attentively. 


Los  Angeles 


$25  Round  Trip 


San  Diego  $29  Round  Trip 

Tickets  on  sale  daily 

Good  for  return  until  October  31,  1912 

Santa  Fe's  new  train 


Angel 

On  the  return  trip  the  Saint  offers 
the  same  superior  service. 

Phone  or  call  on  me  for  reservations. 

Jas.  B.  Duffy.  Gen.  Agt.,  673  Market  St., 
Cisco.    Phone:   Kearny  315  and  J  3371. 


Leaves  San  Francisco 
daily  at  4:00  p.  m. 
This  is  California's 
finest  train 


San  Fran- 


J.  J.  Warner,  Gen.  Agt.,  1218  Broadway,  Oakland. 
I'hone:   Oakland  425  and   A  4425. 


Santa  Fe 


$72.50 

To  Chicago  and  Return 

on  the  peerless 

GOLDEN  STATE  UMITED 

A  Transcontinental  Delight 

This  rate  good  on  many  days  in  June 
July,  August  and  September 

Similar  low  rates  to  many  other  eastern  points 
Return  Limit  October  31,  1912 


Telephone  or  write  our  Agents 

ROCK  ISLAND 
SOUTHERN  PACIFIC 


July  27,  1912  TOWNTALK  17 

**The  Toad  in  the  Greek  Theatre" 

By  Edward  F.  O'Day 


"The  Toad"  by  Mrs.  Bertha  Newberry  is  not 
the  great  American  play.  It  is  not  even  the 
great  Egyptian  play.  There  is  no  danger  that 
it  will  set  either  San  Francisco  Bay  or  the  Nile 
on  fire.  After  seeing  it  one  wonders  why  it  was 
produced  at  the  Greek  Theatre  at  all.  I  felt 
like  asking  Professor  Dallam  Armes  about  that, 
but  refrained.  I  also  felt  like  asking  George 
Davis  who  was  there  whether  he  intended  to  se- 
cure "The  Toad"  for  the  Alcazar.  But  he  would 
have  accused  me  of  joking  him.  Down  at  Car- 
mel,  where  the  Carmelites  love  one  another  with 
real  family  intensity,  there  is  a  division  of  opinion 
about  "The  Toad."  In  San  Francisco  and  Berk- 
eley there  should  be  none.  There  is  no  reason 
why  we  shouldn't  be  unanimous  in  considering 
"The  Toad"  a  poor  play.  Mr.  Garnet  Holme 
made  a  good  production,  "Choragus"  Paul  Stein- 
dorff  acquitted  himself  well,  the  costumes  were 
beautiful,  the  night  with  its  yellow  moon  was 
exquisite  and  some  of  the  actors  were  not  so 
bad.  But  "The  Toad" — well,  it  was  too  bad  that 
such  a  production,  such  music,  such  costumes 
and  such  a  night  should  be  wasted  on  it.  "The 
Toad"  labors  under  the  difficulty  of  not  being 
built  according  to  tlie  rules.  It  works  up  to  no 
big  situation.  It  jogs  leisurely  through  three  acts 
to  an  uninteresting  conclusion.    You  don't  take 


Hackett,  Holland  and  Company 

Any  play  by  the  author  of  the  delicious  "D'Arcy 
of  tile  Guards"  ought  to  be  worth  while.  And 
"The  Grain  of  Dust"  by  Louis  Evan  Shipman  is 
decidedly  worth  while.  To  those  of  us  who 
hadn't  read  the  Graham  Phillips  novel  the  play 
we  witnessed  at  the  Columbia  Monday  night  un- 
folded a  very  interesting  story  of  contempor- 
aneous New  York  life.  Graham  Phillips  was  a 
misogynist.  He  was  pitiless  in  his  depiction  of 
the  woman  of  today  as  she  appeared  to  him.  In 
"The  Grain  of  Dust"  he  developed  a  theme  which 
must  have  given  him  great  satisfaction.  It  deals 
with  the  overpowering  love  which  a  great  lawyer 
has  for  his  stenographer.  Characteristically 
enough,  (if  we  may  take  it  for  granted  that  the 
play  follows  the  book),  Phillips  does  not  repre- 
sent the  lawyer  as  being  infatuated  in  the  ordinary 
sense  of  the  term.  He  gives  up  everything  for 
his  passion,  not  in  blind  impetuosity  but  in  rea- 
soned, calculated  consciousness.  If  he's  a  fool, 
he's  a  fool  with  his  eyes  open.  He  breaks  his 
engagement  to  a  beautiful  girl  of  society,  he 
withdraws  from  the  law  firm  which  handles  the 
affairs  of  the  girl's  millionaire  father.  The  stenog- 
rapher tells  him  that  she  does  not  love  him. 
That  makes  no  difTerence.  He  is  determined  to 
communicate  the  warmth  of  his  own  absorbing 
passion  to  her.  He  marries  her.  The  father  of 
his  jilted  fiancee  sets  about  ruining  him  and  pretty 
nearly  succeeds.  Then  his  stenographer-wife 
leaves  him.  But  in  the  end  he  turns  the  tables. 
He  recovers  his  position  at  the  bar  and  his  wife 
comes  back,  to  love  him  at  last.  No  doubt  a  lot 
of  all  this,  notably  the  desertion  and  return  of 
the  wife,  are  worked  out  in  the  novel  with  Phil- 
lips' usual  mordant  cleverness.  In  the  play  much 
must  be  left  to  the  imagination.  The  motives  be- 
hind the  ups  and  downs  of  the  love  affair  are 
hastily  indicated,  but  not  altogether  without  plau- 
sibility. The  best  parts  of  the  play  deal  with  the 
duel  between  the  lawyer  and  the  millionaire.  It 
is  war  to  the  knife  and  both  have  their  victories 


the  slightest  interest  in  any  of  the  characters. 
They  do  nothing,  say  nothing  to  excite  your 
sympathies.  You  don't  care  a  rap  whether  the 
bad  Prince  Aahmes  kills  his  brother  and  takes 
the  throne  of  Acortis.  In  fact,  on  the  two  or 
three  occasions  when  the  King  appears  he  proves 
himself  a  good  deal  of  a  bore.  Perhaps  that  is 
why  Aahmes  dislikes  him.  You  don't  blame 
Queen  Ismar  for  throwing  the  King  over.  The 
lady  with  the  fortune-telling  name  has  an  awful 
crush  on  Aahmes,  but  Aahmes  is  a  thorough 
good-for-nothing  who  uses  the  Queen  for  his 
ambitious  plans  and  laughs  at  her  love  in  his 
Egyptian  sleeve.  Aahmes  is  very  strong  for 
Cleis,  the  seeress,  but  she  is  what  we  so  pic- 
turesquely call  "dead  stuck"  on  Pasara,  the  King's 
younger  brother.  Aahmes  is  a  good  deal  of  a 
bungler  when  it  comes  to  having  the  King  killed. 
The  Toad  is  the  champion  foiler  of  Acortis,  and 
he  foils  Aahmes  several  times.  Being  the  King's 
dwarf  the  Toad  is  very  close  to  the  King  and 
guards  him  closely  until  the  third  act.  In  the 
third  act  Aahmes  borrows  the  key  of  the  royal 
chamber  from  Queen  Ismar,  borrows  a  knife 
from  one  of  his  friends — he  is  quite  a  borrower — 
and  knifes  the  King.  For  some  reason  or  other 
the  Toad  is  not  around  to  prevent  him,  probably 
because  the  author  thought  it  was  high  time 


Gossip  of  the  Theatre 

and  their  defeats.  In  these  scenes  Hackett  is  at 
his  best.  There  is  something  of  his  "Sampson" 
in  the  character  of  Frederick  Norman.  The 
pugnacity  of  the  man,  his  iron  will,  his  refusal 
to  accept  defeat,  his  almost  brutal  insistence  on 


MRS.    LOUIS  JAMES 
Who  will  appear  in  the  triangular  comedy  "Holding  a 
Husband"   this   Sunday   matinee   at   the  Orpheum. 

revenge,  his  implacability,  all  are  masterfully 
portrayed.  Hackett  does  these  things  well,  does 
them  much  better  than  he  does  the  less  intense 
parts  of  the  play.  Perhaps  he  is  too  much  the 
actor  when  he  makes  love,  when  he  converses 
with  his  sister.  But  put  him  face  to  face  with  a 
man  who  is  trying  to  get  the  better  of  him,  and 
he's  superb.  Holland  is  a  joy  forever.  He  plays 
the  part  of  a  middle-aged  bachelor  with  the  kind- 
liest of  hearts  and  little  serio-comic  mannerisms 


to  get  the  King  killed  off.  Aahmes  naturally 
thinks  he'll  be  King  now,  but  he  bungles  again. 
He  makes  violent  love  to  Cleis  in  the  presence 
of  the  Queen.  Of  course  she  is  furious.  Al- 
though she  was  a  party  to  the  King's  death  she 
denounces  Aahmes  to  the  people  and  orders  that 
he  be  burned  to  death.  Then  the  good  brother 
Pasara  announces  his  engagement  to  Cleis  and 
the  Queen  gives  him  the  crown.  This  is  the 
signal  for  an  amazingly  bad  dance  by  a  group  of 
airy  Egyptian  maidens.  Then  we  are  given 
ocular  proof  that  the  King  is  dead;  we  see  him 
lying  on  his  couch  with  a  knife  in  his  ribs.  That 
brings  the  play  to  an  end.  It  would  be  unfair 
to  the  actors  to  blame  them  for  not  making  "The 
Toad"  interesting  or  impressive.  Such  a  thing 
couldn't  be  done  by  a  company  of  Irvings,  Mans- 
ficlds,  Ellen  Terrys  and  Julia  Marlowes.  Not 
that  "The  Toad"  was  given  by  any  such  company. 
The  actors  were  amateurs,  and  rather  unpolished 
amateurs  at  that.  The  one  player  who  stood  out 
was  Sophie  Treadwell  who  plays  Queen  Ismar. 
Miss  Treadwell  was  a  stunning  queen.  She  had 
a  queenly  carriage  and  made  queenly  gestures. 
Besides,  she  showed  dramatic  intensity.  .She  read 
her  lines  well,  but  alas!  they  were  not  very  good 
lines. 


of  face  and  walk  and  gesture.  He  draws  his  por- 
trait to  the  life,  to  the  last  stroke  of  naturalness. 
That  he  is  one  of  our  best  actors  is  as  apparent 
in  this  play  as  it  has  always  been.  The  rest  of 
tlic  company  is  notable.  Frazer  Coulter,  Frank 
lUirbeck,  Vaughan  Trevor,  Charles  Lane  and  Fred 
Sullivan  are  all  good  actors.  So  are  the  women. 
Beatrice  Beckley  as  the  stenographer  who  be- 
comes the  lawyer's  wife,  plays  an  ultra-modern 
role  with  a  great  deal  of  understanding.  The 
action  revolves  about  this  part,  but  the  circum- 
stances of  the  drama  make  it  necessary  that  the 
character  be  unobtrusive,  a  significant  figure  but 
not  too  much  in  the  foreground.  Miss  Beckley 
realizes  this  throughout.  Olive  Oliver  and 
Elaine  Inescourt  also  acquit  themselves  well. 

— Edward  F.  O'Day. 


Gilbert  and  Sullivan  Revival 

Have  we  been  surfeited  with  musical  comedy? 
It  would  seem  so  now  that  the  wise  men  who 
cater  to  public  taste  in  matters  theatrical  have 
given  us  a  revival  of  Gilbert  and  Sullivan.  And 
dear  old  comic  opera  twain,  long  though  they 
have  been  gathering  dust  on  the  shelf,  back  in 
the  limelight  they  seem  just  as  fresh  as  the 
flowers  that  bloom  in  the  spring.  Gilbert  and 
Sullivan  must  now  be  hailed  as  classics.  We  are 
their  posterity  and  we  enjoy  them.  At  the  Cort 
Theatre  Sunday  night  they  were  given  a  recep- 
tion even  warmer  than  the  greeting  which  the 
old  favorites  in  the  cast  of  The  Mikado  received. 
And  the  comic  opera  that  first  came  to  America 
so  many,  many  years  ago  was  presented  in  all 
its  pristine  purity.  There  is  no  attempt  to  brmg 
it  down  to  date;  that  is,  to  give  it  any  adventitious 
aids  such  as  might  be  designed  by  the  twentieth 
century  stage  manager  enthusiastic  for  new 
wrinkles  of  the  kind  that  have  helped  to  make 
insipid  and  colorless  musical  comedies  go.  The 
Mikado  as  seen  and  heard  at  the  Cort  is  notable 
for  its  reverent  adherence  to  the  traditional  "busi- 
ness" of  the  opera.    Wise  in  his  generation  was 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


the  satirical  Gilbert.  He  knew  the  propensity  of 
the  comedian  to  "gag"  and  of  the  provincial  stage 
manager  to  add  little  touches  of  his  own.  Gil- 
bert would  have  none  of  these  things.  He  super- 
vised the  rehearsals  and  production  of  his  works, 
and  when  they  went  forth  into  the  world  it  was 
with  the  strict  injunction  that  nothing  should  be 
changed.  This  injunction  I  judge  is  still  in  force 
and  effect.  Though  not  sumptuously  mounted 
the  opera  is  very  prettily  sung.  Blanche  Duffield, 
the  Yum  Yum  and  .Mice  Brady,  the  Pitti  Sing 
are  young,  pretty  and  graceful.  They  sing 
sweetly  with  thread-like  voice  and  act  like 
embryonic  mimes.  De  Wolf  Hopper  is  of  course 
an  excellent  Ko-Ko,  for  he  is  a  most  discreet 


comedian,  a  man  of  wit  who  never  descends  to 
clownishness.  Eugene  Covvles,  .Arthur  Cunnmg- 
ham,  George  Macfarlane  and  Kate  Condon  all  re- 
ceived on  Sunday  night  the  welcome  due  to  old 
friends.  Mr.  Cunningham  was  so  glad  to  see  his 
applauders  of  other  days  that  he  rewarded  them 
for  their  "kind  applause"  by  promptly  stepping 
out  of  the  picture  and  making  a  neat  little  speech 
right  on  the  spot.  The  others  showed  their  keen 
appreciation  by  their  readiness  to  respond  with 
encores.  The  comic  opera  season  at  the  Cort 
will  doubtless  be  exceedingly  gratifying  to  all 
concerned. 

— H.  M.  B. 


"The  Drums  of  Oude"  and  Other  Acts 

If  you  haven't  heard  the  drums  of  Oude  beat 
their  sinister  tattoo  at  the  Orpheum  you  have 


missed  a  great  vaudeville  experience.  By  all 
means  go  and  listen  to  their  monotone.  Let 
your  mind  absorb  their  intimations  of  approach- 
ing tragedy.  Surrender  to  the  spell  of  Austin 
Strong's  one-act  drama.  Let  its  thrills  send  the 
shivers  up  and  down  your  spine.  You'll  feel 
invigorated,  stimulated  when  the  play  is  over. 
You'll  find  it  difficult  to  relax  the  tension  when 
Lew  Sully  appears  and  remarks  that  the  noise 
reminded  him  of  the  Chicago  convention.  David 
Belasco  has  done  well  by  Strong  in  this  splendid 
little  drama.  .'\11  the  Belasco  skill  has  gone  to 
supply  the  proper  atmosphere  of  fear  and  uneasi- 
ness. A  sense  of  mysterious  danger  pervades  the 
play.    You  are  fascinated,  enthralled  from  begin- 


ning to  end.  The  love  of  melodrama  that  is  in 
all  of  us  finds  ample  satisfaction.  The  players 
accentuate  the  sense  of  coming  doom.  Their 
performance  is  given  in  a  high  key,  so  to  speak. 
They  are  moving  in  the  presence  of  death,  and  act 
as  brave  men  and  women  might  be  expected  to 
act  under  such  trying  conditions.  "The  Drums  of 
Oude"  is  well  written,  produced  well,  acted  well. 
The  applause  which  follows  its  exciting  denoue- 
ment is  tribute  to  the  play  and  the  players.  This 
drama  is  the  piece  de  resistance  of  an  unusual 
bill.  There  are  seven  new  acts  in  it,  all  good. 
The  only  holdover  is  the  irresistible  farce  "The 
Battle  Cry  of  Freedom"  which  gives  May  TuUy 
and  her  company  the  opportunity  to  poke  fun  at 
the  Nevada  divorce  law.  Foreign  dancers  do  not 
always  impress  Orpheumites,  but  Mile.  Sealby 
and  M.  Duclos  are  among  the  exceptions.  Both 


are  graceful  and  Mile.  Sealby  is  very  pretty  and 
very  prettily  costumed  into  the  bargain.  Their 
"valse  exquise"  pleased;  so  did  their  "tango  Ar- 
gentin;"  but  their  Apache  dance  brought  the 
house  down.  Theirs  is  Apache  dancing  raised  to 
the  nth  power.  Apparently  the  Apache  is  trying 
to  kill  his  girl,  but  despite  his  chokings  and  hurl- 
ings  and  other  manhandlings  she  keeps  on  danc- 
ings serenely,  in  the  end  proving  that  the  female 
Apache  is  more  ferocious  than  the  male.  Lew 
Sully  we  know  of  old,  but  he  is  always  a  welcome 
visitor.  His  silliness  is  a  bid  for  laughter  that 
cannot  be  refused.  His  imitation  of  Alice  Lloyd 
is  very  low  comedy,  but  it  scores.  Stein,  Hume 
and  Thomas  are  presentable  chaps  with  very 
good  voices  whose  bgigest  hit  is  a  parody  of  grand 
opera.  The  Orpheum  couldn't  get  enough  of 
them  on  Sunday.  Then  there  is  Bert  Terrell,  a 
Dutch  character  singer,  and  in  the  acrobatic  line, 
the  Eugene  trio  and  the  four  Florimonds.  The 
bill  is  rounded  out  with  one  of  the  most  thrill- 
ing motion  pictures  you've  ever  seen. 

— The  First  Xightcr. 


Bessie  Barriscale  in  "My  Wife" 

Having  obtained  an  extension  of  Bessie  Bar- 
riscale's  stay  at  the  Alcazar,  the  management  has 
acceded  to  popular  request  by  deciding  to  pre- 
sent her  in  "My  Wife"  next  week.  When  she 
last  appeared  here  in  this  play,  about  two  year-, 
ago,  her  grip  on  the  favor  of  the  Alcazar's 
clientele  was  immeasurably  strengthened,  for  sh^- 
had  a  role  that  brought  out  all  the  charm  of 
her  dainty  personality  and  enabled  her  to  reveal 
new  and  charming  phases  of  her  art.  Hence  the 
demand  for  its  revival.  In  the  cast  with  Miss 
Barriscale  will  be  Forrest  Stanley  and  the  full 
strength  of  the  Alcazar  company.  Mr.  Stanley 
has  never  appeared  in  San  Francisco,  but  folk 
who  keep  in  touch  with  the  American  stage  ncul 
not  be  informed  that  he  is  rated  one  of  its  fore- 
most leading  men.  That  he  will  more  than  meet 
the  exacting  demands  of  the  Alcazar  management 
has  been  demonstrated  by  his  acting  at  rehearsals 
of  "My  Wife,"  in  which  he  has  a  part  that  brings 
out  his  most  effective  histrionic  methods.  "My 
Wife"  was  adapted  from  the  French  by  Michel 
Morton,  and  John  Drew  was  using  it  as  a  starring 
vehicle  %vhen  the  work  of  Billie  Burke  in  the  part 
of  Trixie  Dupre  threatened  his  supremacy  in  the 
cast  and  elevated  her  to  the  stellar  position 
which  she  has  since  occupied.  This  is  the  char- 
acter in  which  Miss  Barriscale  will  be  seen.  For 
the  closing  week  of  Miss  Barriscale's  stay  at  the 
Alcazar,  beginning  Monday  after  next,  is  an- 
nounced the  first  presentation  in  a  stock  theatre 
of  "A  Royal  Family"  which  served  Annie  Rus- 
as  a  starring  vehicle  during  three  consecutive  sv.i 
sons.  Then  comes  a  brief  engagement  of  Laur- 
ette  Taylor  whose  opening  play  will  be  "The  Girl 
in  Waiting." 


Musiccil  Comedy  at  the  Orpheum 

Marguerite  Haney  will  appear  in  B.  A.  Rolfe's 
tabloid  musical  comedy  "The  Leading  Lady"  at 
the  Orpheum  next  week.  Miss  Haney  has  just 
returned  from  Paris  where  she  made  a  decided  hit 
in  the  review  at  the  Folies  Bergere.  Supporting 
Miss  Haney  as  leading  comedian  is  Ralph  Lynn, 
an  English  actor.  "The  Leading  Lady"  has  a 
company  of  ten  and  a  special  scenic  equipment. 
Mrs.  Louis  James,  widow  of  Louis  James,  will 
make  her  vaudeville  debut  in  this  city  in  a  comedy 
by  Arthur  Hopkins  entitled  "Holding  a  Husband" 
in  which  she  will  have  the  support  of  Laurette 
Brown  and  Elwood  Bostock.  Mrs.  James  for 
several  years  played  the  leading  roles  with  Mr. 
James.  She  afterwards  starred  in  Mrs.  Frances 
Hodgson  Burnett's  play  "Judy  O'Hara."  The 
}X3U  3UIOD  os\Te  Jnoj  Xpauio^  sjidiug  jE|ndod 
week.    Pauline    Moran,   a   singing  comedienne, 


BL.\NCHE  DUFFIELD 
The  celebrated  prima  donna  who  will  be  heard  as  Josephine   in  "Pinafore" 
at   the   Cort   Sunday  night. 


July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


19 


brings  a  clever  and  amusing  entertainment.  Next 
week  will  be  the  last  of  Lew  Sully,  the  four 
Florimonds  and  Mademoiselle  Sealby  and  Mon- 
sieur Duclos.  Also  of  David  Belasco's  "The 
Drums  of  Oude." 


"The  Grain  of  Dust"  for  Another  Week 

The  second  and  final  week  of  "The  Grain  of 
Dust"  commences  at  the  Columbia  Monday  night. 
There  will  be  a  bargain  matinee  Wednesday  in 
addition  to  the  regular  Saturday  matinee.  For 
the  third  week  of  the  Hackett  season  there  will 
be  staged  for  the  first  time  anywhere  a  new  play 
from  the  pen  of  Brandon  Tynan,  the  actor-au- 
thor. It  is  called  "The  Melody  of  Youth" 
and  is  in  three  acts  with  a  story  of  Irish  interest. 
Tynan  is  said  to  have  turned  out  a  particularly 
fine  bit  of  stage  literature,  far  in  advance  of  any- 
thing previously  done  by  him.  He  will  appear  in 
the  cast  with  Mr.  Hackett,  Mrs.  Thomas  Whiffcn 
and  others.  The  premiere  of  the  play  will  bring 
out  a  throng  of  theatergoers  on  Monday,  Au- 
gust 5. 


Next  Comes  "Pinafore" 

The  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  Festival  Company 
now  presenting  a  season  of  revivals  of  those 
famous  authors  at  the  Cort  change  their  bill  on 
Sunday  evening  and  will  present  for  the  entire 
week  one  of  the  most  popular  of  the  even  dozen 
which  they  gave  to  the  world,  "H.  M.  S.  Pinafore." 
It  has  been  thirty-five  years  since  this  opera  was 
first  given  in  America.  It  had  been  running  for 
a  few  months  in  London  before  any  American 
manager  had  the  temerity  to  risk  its  production. 
It  was  feared  that  it  was  too  British  and  insular 
to  make  an  appeal  to  this  country.  But  its  suc- 
cess here  is  a  part  of  our  stage  history.  DeWolf 
Hopper  will  be  seen  as  Dick  Deadeye,  Blanche 
Duffield  as  Josephine,  Eugene  Cowles  as  Bill 
Bobstay,  Arthur  Aldridge  as  Ralph  Rackstraw, 
Viola  Gillette  as  Little  Buttercup,  Arthur  Cun- 
ningham as  Sir  Joseph  Porter,  K.  C.  B.  and 
Alice  Brady  as  Hebe.  For  the  third  week  of 
comic  opera  at  the  Cort  "Patience"  will  be  given 
production  the  first  half  of  the  week  and  "The 
Pirates  of  Penzance"  the  final  half  of  that  same 
week. 


The  Usual  High  Level  at  Pantages 

Mirth,  melody  and  good  entertainment  gener- 
ally reign  supreme  at  Pantages  this  week, 
crowded  houses  being  in  continual  evidence.  An 
unusually  bright  array  of  attractions  has  been  se- 
cured for  the  week  commencing  Sunday  after- 
noon, Fred  Ireland  and  his  dancing  Casino  girls 
heading  the  bill.  Ireland  who  is  well  known  in 
musical  comedy  circles,  brings  a  clever  little  com- 
pany, including  Miss  Nema  Catto  and  P.  W. 
Miles,  and  will  present  a  miniature  musical  com- 
edy entitled  "High  Lights  of  Dear  Old  Broad- 
way," in  which  they  sing  six  songs  with  a  com- 
plete change  of  costume  for  every  number. 
Wood's  Animal  Actors,  comprising  several  dogs 
that  do  almost  everything  but  talk  and  four 
monkeys  that  play  "The  Swanee  River,"  on 
chimes,  will  enliven  proceedings.  El  Barto, 
styled  the  "conversational  trickster,"  will  deliver 
an  original  monologue  as  he  mystifies  his  audience 
with  extraordinary  feats  of  prestidigitation.  A 
special  engagement  of  great  interest  to  local 
lovers  of  clean,  manly  sport  is  that  of  Willie 
Ritchie,  the  popular  lightweight  who  is  looking 
for  championship  honors  that  seem  to  be  easily 
within  his  reach.  He  will  offer  a  little  skit  "Fun 
in  a  Gymnasium"  in  which  he  will  punch  the  bag, 
s'  ij)  the  rope  and  do  all  sorts  of  training  stunts, 
in  addition  to  sparring  three  rounds  with  his  box- 
ing partner.  The  Four  Flying  Valentines,  aeriai 
athletes  who  are  renowned  for  being  as  daring  as 
they  are  finished  and  graceful,  will  furnish  a  start- 


ling exhibition.  Ed  Dale  and  Edith  Pfeil,  com- 
edy singers  and  talkers  who  have  no  end  of 
snappy  songs  and  small  talk,  will  furnish  much 
food  for  laughter.  Howsley  and  Nichols,  novelty 
comedy  musicians  who  play  well  upon  a  variety 
of  instruments,  and  Sunlight  Pictures,  showing 
many  pictorial  surprises,  will  complete  a  varied 
and  entertaining  program. 


AMUSEMENTS 

San  Francisco  Girls  on  Broadway 

Do  the  San  Francisco  girls  who  go  to  Broad- 
way lack  "politeness  of  style?"  .Are  they  de- 
ficient in  refinement  and  gentle  charm?  Are 
they  vociferous?  Is  their  style  so  pronounced 
that  after  a  bit  they  drift  from  musical  comedy 
to  vaudeville?  The  dramatic  critic  of  the  New 
York  Sun  says  so,  but  his  authority  may  be 
questioned.  Here  is  the  way  ne  discusses  the 
situation: 

"The  difficulty  of  finding  young  women  to  fill 
the  leading  roles  in  the  polite  musical  comedies 
was  emphasized  last  autumn  when  three  actresses 
were  tried  before  it  was  possible  to  find  one  that 
filled  the  part  acceptably.  The  local  stage  is 
deficient  in  the  type  of  youthful  femininity  that 
is  best  adapted  to  such  uses.  Even  for  some  of 
the  Viennese  musical  plays  it  has  been  found 
necessary  to  send  to  London  to  find  the  satis- 
factory singer.  Yet  the  American  theatre  is 
full  of  comediennes  who  in  humor  and  vivacity, 
.  in  their  spirit  and  animation  are  much  the  su- 
perior of  these  pretty  but  rather  inanimate  Brit- 
ish types.  But  it  is  a  curious  fact  that  they  are 
much  more  suited  to  the  music  halls  than  they  are 
to  the  musical  plays  produced  in  the  regular 
theatres.  Some  of  the  most  talented  of  these 
American  girls  are  now  coming  from  San  Fran- 
cisco, the  city  which  has  given  so  many  famous 
actors  to  the  American  theatre.  They  show  stage 
intelligence,  their  sense  of  humor  is  strong  and 
they  are  successful  entertainers  who  ought  to  find 
a  place  in  the  musical  plays  of  the  rougher  sort 
that  are  such  a  characteristic  development  of 
our  stage.  But  their  style  is  a  little  pronounced 
even  for  these  pieces  and  after  unsuccessful  ef- 
forts to  establish  themselves  on  the  regular  stage 
they  drift  back  into  vaudeville.  The  fact  is,  of 
course,  that  they  lack  the  politeness  of  style  which 
the  audiences  at  the  Broadway  theatres  demand. 
It  is  not  enough  for  a  woman  w*o  appears  in 
a  play  there  to  be  funny,  nor  is  it  enough  that  she 
dance  and  sing  well.  There  must  be  an  element 
of  refinement  and  gentle  charm,  whether  the 
musical  original  of  the  play  came  from  the  Gaiety 
Theatre  in  London,  the  Theater  an  der  Wien  or 
the  Apollo  in  Paris.  Perhaps  there  is  occasional 
insipidity  in  the  smiling  beauty  who  is  now  in 
the  favor  of  the  public,  but  she  is  better  adapted 
to  the  demands  of  musical  plays  as  tsew  York 
audiences  want  them  than  the  vociferous  ladies 
from  the  West,  however  clever  in  characteriza- 
'tion,  graceful  in  the  turkey  trot  or  expert  at 
various  kinds  of  'rag'  they  may  be." 


"Hello!  Sit  down.  I  believe  you  have  come 
to  ask  me — " 

"You  have  been  misinformed;  I  haven't  come 
to  ask  you  anything." 

"Why,  I  understood  you — " 

"I  came  merely  because  I  wished  to  be  first 
to  tell  you  a  bit  of  good  news.  I  am  going  to 
marry  your  daughter." 

St.  Mary's  College,  Oakland,  Cal. 

Conducted  by  the  Brothers  of  the  Christian 
Schools.  Department  of  Arts  and  Letters,  Civil 
Engineering,  Commerce,  and  High  School  De- 
partment.   BROTHER  ZENONIAN,  Registrar. 

Fall  term  begins  September  5,  1912. 


Safest  and  Most 
Magnificent 
Theatre  in 

0'fIVRRt\.\.  B~T  S'XOCV.TOn  £r  PQ\Nt\.V  America 


Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afternoon.  Matinee  Every  Day 

THE  HIGHEST  STANDARD  OF  VAUDEVILLE 

MARGUERITE  HANEY  in  B.  A.  Rolfe's  Tabloid  Musical 
Comedy  "The  Leading  Lady"  with  Ralph  Lynn;  MRS. 
LOUIS  TAMES  in  the  Triangular  Comedy  "Holding  a 
Husband";  EMPIRE  COMEDY  FOUR;  PALILINE 
MORAN,  Singing  Comedienne;  LEW  SULLY;  FOUR 
FLORIMONDS;  SEALBY  and  DUCLOS;  NEW  DAY- 
LIGHT MOTION  PICTURES.  Last  Week  of  DAVID 
BELASCO'S  PRODUCTION  of  "THE  DRUMS  OF 
OUDE." 

Evening   Prices,   10c,   25c,   50c,   75c.     Box   Seats,  $1.00. 
Matinee  Prices  (except  Sundays  and  Holidays),  10c,  25c,  50c. 
Phones,  Douglas  70  and  Home  C  1570. 


CQRX 


Leading  Theatre 


Ellis  and  Market 
Phone  Sutter  2460 

"The  Mikado." 
(Sunday)  Night 


Last  Time  Tonight- 
Beginning  Tomorrow 

Second  Big  Week  of 
THE  GILBERT  &  SULLIVAN  FESTIVAL  CO. 
De   Wolf  Hopper 
Blanche   Dufifield  Geo.  MacFarlane 

Kate    Condon  Arthur  Aldridge 

Viola  Gillette  Arthur  Cunningham 

Alice  Brady  Louise  Barthel 

Eugene  Cowles 
In 

"H.  M.  S.  PINAFORE" 

Nights  and  Saturday  Matinee  Prices — 50c  to  $2.00. 
Popular  Matinees  Wednesdays. 
Seats  Now  Selling  for  Week  commencing  Sunday.  Au- 
gust 4th.  Sunday,  Monday,  Tuesday,  Wednesday  Matinee 
and  Night.  "Patience";  Thursday,  Friday,  Saturday  Matinee 
and  Night,  "The  Pirates  of  Penzance."  Week  Commenc- 
ing Monday,  August  12th — To  Be  Announced. 


ALCAZAR  THEATRE 

O'Farrell,  near  Powell.  Phones,  Kearny  2  and  Home  C  4455 
Monday    Evening,    July    29th,    and    Throughout    the  Week 

BESSIE  BARRISCALE 

Assisted  by  FORREST  STANLEY  (His  First  Appearance 
in  San  Francisco)  and  the  Alcazar  Company,  in 
"MY  WIFE" 
Michel   Morton's   Delicious  Comedy. 

Prices;  Night,  25c  to  $1.00;  Matinee,  25c  tn  iOc 
Matinee:    Thursday.    Saturday    and  Sun(];iy 


COLUMBIA  THEATRE 

T'lc   Leading   Playhouse.    Geary  and  Masun  it» 
Phones,  Franklin  150  and  Home  C  S7f<^ 

Beginning    Monday,    July    29  th — Second  Week 

JAMES  K. 

HACKETT 

.\nd  His  Company  of   Famous  New   York  Players  in  the 
Dramatization    of    David    Graham    Phillip's  Novel 
"THE  GRAIN   OF  DUST" 
Evenings  and  Saturday  Matinee,  $1.50  to  25c. 
Bargain  Matinee  Wednesday,  25c,  50c,  75c  and  $1.00. 
Monday,    August    5th — Brandon    Tynan's    new  play 
"The  Melody  of  Youth." 


Pantage's  Theatre 

Market  Street.  Opposite  Mason 

Week  of  Sunday,  July  28th 
HERE'S  A  BIG  SHOWI 

Frederick  Ireland  and  His  Dancing  Casino  Girls,  As- 
sisted by  Miss  Nema  Catto;  Wood's  Animal  Actors;  El 
Barto,  the  Conversational  Trickster;  Howsley  and  Nichols, 
Novelty  Comedy  Musicians;  Four  Flying  Valentines,  Sen- 
sational Acrialists;  Ed  Dale  and  Edith  Pfeil,  Comedy  Sing- 
ers and  Talkers ;  Sunlight  Pictures  and 
WILLIE  RITCHIE 
In   "Fun   in   a  Gymnasium." 

Matinee  Daily  at  2:30.  Nights,  7:15  and  9:15.  Sunday 
and  Holidays  Matinees  at  1:30  and  3:30.  Nights  Con- 
tinuous from  6:30. 

Prices — 10c,  20c  and  30c. 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


The  Financial  Outlook 

By  R.  E.  Mulcahy 


Wells  Fargo  Nevada  National  Bank 

OF   SAN  FRANCISCO 

No.  2  MONTGOMERY  STREET 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  ..  .$11,055,471.11 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   10.519,217.23 

Deposits    25,775,597.47 

Officers— Isaias  W.  Hcllman,  Pres.;  I.  \V.  Hellman  Jr., 
v. -Pres. ;  F.  L.  Lipman,  V.-Pres. ;  James  K.  Wilson, 
V.-Pres. ;  Frank  B.  King,  Cashier;  W.  McGavin,  Asst. 
Cashier;  E.  L.  Jacobs,  Asst.  Cashier;  C.  L.  Davis,  Asst. 
Cashier;  A.  D.  Oliver,  Asst.  Cashier;  A.  B.  Price,  Asst. 
Cashier. 

Directors — Isaias  W.  Hellman,  I.  W.  Hellman  Jr., 
Joseph  Sloss,  A.  Christeson,  Percy  T.  Morgan,  Wm. 
Haas,  F.  \V.  Van  Sicklcn,  Hartland  Law,  Wm.  F. 
Ilerrin,  Henry  Rosentcid,  John  C.  Kirkpatrick,  James 
L.  Flood,  J.  Henry  Meyer,  Chas.  J.  Deering,  A.  II. 
Payson,  James  K.  Wilson  and  F.  L.  Lipman. 
Customers  of  this  Bank  are  offered  every  facility  consis- 
tent with  prudent  banking.  New  accounts  are  invited. 
Safe  Deposit  Vaults 


Merchants  National  Bank 
of  San  Francisco 

Corner   New  Montgomery  and  Market  Streets 

Capital,  Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits.  .$1,768,076.98 

Cash  and  Sight  Exchange   1,639,482.36 

Deposits    6,368.228.50 

OFFICERS 

Alfred  L.  Meyerstein  President 

J.    H.    Spring  Vice-President 

C.    A.    Hawkins  Vice-President 

K.  B.  Murdoch   Assistant  to  President 

W.    W.   Jones  Cashier 

Geo.  Long   Assistant  Cashier 

C.   C.   Campbell  -Assistant  Cashier 

F.   W.   Judson  Assistant  Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Geo.   C.    Boardman         W.  J.  Hotchkiss 
James  C.  Eschen  C.  A.  Hawkins 

John  ^L  Keith  Gavin  McNab 

.Alfred  L.  Meyerstein  Robert  Oxnard 
Frederick  F.  Sayre  John  H.  Spring 
Harry  N.  Stetson  G.  H.  I'mbsen 

A.  A.  Watkins 
The  officers  of  this  Bank  will  be  pleased  to  meet  or 

correspond    with    those    who    contemplate  making 

changes  or  opening  new  accounts. 

Safe  Deposit  Vaults  open  from  7:30  a.  m.  to  12 

p.  m.,  Sundays  and  Holidays  included. 


Stocks — With  the  cessation  of  loan  calling  by 
the  clearing  house  banks,  the  forced  liquidation 
tliat  characterized  trading  in  the  stock  market  last 
week  disappeared  altogether  and  was  replaced  by 
a  renewal  of  buying  operations  on  a  small  scale. 
Bullish  enthusiasm  was  awakened  by  the  receipt 
of  highly  favorable  crop  advices,  both  grain  and 
cotton,  and  by  reports  of  better  business  and 
banking  conditions  in  the  South  and  West. 
Though  trading  reached  only  meager  proportions, 
optimistic  sentiment  prevailed  in  the  financial  dis- 
trict. Purchasing  by  banking  interests  and  bull 
leaders  in  the  .Stock  Exchange  proved  sufficient 
to  advance  considerably  the  prices  of  a  majority 
of  the  active  issues.  As  the  early  upturns  were 
either  added  to  or  held  in  the  late  trading,  the 
standard  railroads  and  principal  industrial  groups 
showed  net  gains  ranging  from  small  fractions 
to  more  than  two  points  when  business  ceased, 
while  American  Tobacco  Common  recorded  a 
n-et  gain  of  five  points.  St.  Paul  continued  to 
show  weakness,  as  a  result  of  disturbing  rumors 
of  further  cutting  or  passing  of  its  dividend,  but 
even  this  stock  recovered  nearly  all  its  decline 
and  closed  the  week  fairly  strong.  It  was  evident 
from  the  outset  that  the  elimination  of  the 
deficit  in  the  reserves  of  the  clearing  house  insti- 
tutions and  the  substitution  of  .substantial  cash 
surplus,  restored  confidence  in  the  banking  world 
to  such  a  degree  as  to  elicit  its  support  of  all  high 
class  securities. 

Wheat — The  sharp  downturn  in  the  wheat 
market  last  week,  and  especially  during  the  first 
days  of  the  present  week,  illustrates  the  wonder- 
ful force  of  public  sentiment  and  the  powerful 
momentum  it  acquires  when  thoroughly  started 
in  any  one  direction.  At  the  present  time  it  is  a 
case  of  trade  imagination  running  wild  and  fancy 
has  greater  force  than  fact.  The  anticipation  that 
there  will  be  a  bountiful  spring  wheat  crop  some 
time  hence  had  more  influence  than  the  certainty 
that  there  has  already  been  a  calamitous  destruc- 
tion of  winter  wheat,  as  proven  by  the  meager 
harvest  returns  that  are  every  day  in  evidence. 
July  wheat  has  now  had  a  decline  of  over  20  cents 
a  bushel  and  September  over  15  cents  a  bushel 
from  the  height  of  the  advance  in  May,  when  the 
certainty  of  the  immense  damage  to  the  winter 
wheat  had  become  definitely  established.  Since 
that  time  there  has  not  been  the  slightest  improve- 
ment of  the  crop  in  the  soft  winter  wheat  States, 
which  last  year  produced  185  million  bushels  of 
wheat.  In  some  sections  it  has  been  utterly  an- 
nihilated, so  that  it  will  be  necessary  to  ship  in 
wheat  for  Fall  seeding.  In  large  areas  in  several 
of  the  producing  States  it  wil  scarcely  be  known 
that  there  is  a  wheat  harvest  this  year.  This 
statement  is  being  borne  out  every  day.  Even 


Minneapolis,  whence  all  the  bumper  crop  reports 
emanate,  has  dropped  to  one-fourth  the  receipts 
it  had  last  year  and  is  fast  reducing  its  stock 
in  store.  Accordingly,  it  is  not  the  movement 
from  the  harvest  fields  that  has  had  the  depress- 
ing influence,  nor  is  it  burdensome  supplies,  for 
they  are  the  smallest  in  nearly  two  years,  and 
are  still  growing  less,  but  it  is  the  apathy  of  the 
flour  trade  which  has  reversed  the  sentiment  and 
has  bewildered  speculative  trade  so  that  liquida- 
tion of  long  holders  has  been  the  order  of  the 
day,  and  this  in  turn  has  encouraged  the  selling 
movement  to  discount  an  anticipated  big  spring 
wheat  crop. 

Corn — Values  are  still  very  high,  if  the  present 
crop  is  harvested  with  no  material  injury.  It  is 
late;  the  stand  in  many  sections  is  uneven,  stocks 
are  light  and  growing  less;  the  country  move- 
ment is  small  and  is  all  absorbed  by  the  current 
demand.  Accordingly,  present  prices  are  on  de- 
batable ground,  and  with  the  bearish  sentiment  in 
all  cereals,  the  market  is  liable  to  become  heavily 
oversold  and  subject  to  sharp  reaction.  But  aside 
from  this  prices  are  not  low  enough  to  be  attrac- 
tive to  investors  without  some  adverse  crop  con- 
ditions. 

Cotton — Correspondents'  reports  show  that  fav- 
orable weather  prevailed  during  the  week  in  North 
Carolina,  Tennessee,  Mississippi,  Arkansas  and 
Oklahoma  and  that  as  a  result  the  crop  made 
normal  advancement  for  the  season.  Headway 
w^as  made  in  cultivation  and  while  fields  are  not 
unusually  clean  in  these  States  they  will  be  put 
so  within  another  week  or  ten  days,  without  rain, 
or  preferably  with  well  distributed  light  showers. 
Decidedly  unfavorable  returns  are  received  from 
South  Carolina,  Georgia  and  Alabama  where  by 
reason  of  excessive  rainfall  little  field  work  was 
done  and  the  crops  are  badly  infested  with  grass. 
The  plant  is  small  in  most  instances  but  where  it 
has  attained  size  it  is  sappy.  None  of  it  is  well 
fruited  and  the  growth  has  been  made  on  such  an 
abundance  of  moisture  that  rather  frequent  light 
rains  are  needed  now  to  maintain  its  condition. 
In  Texas  and  Louisiana  the  crop  appears  to  have 
about  held  its  condition,  showers  in  the  former 
States  coming  in  time  to  prevent  any  deteriora- 
tion but  not  in  sufficient  quantity  to  prevent  suf- 
fering if  dry  hot  weather  supervenes.  Further 
rains  would  carry  the  States'  crop  forward  with- 
out a  halt.  Reports  east  of  the  Mississippi  river 
are  sometimes  conflicting.  The  majority  are  not 
good  but  there  is  a  minority  which'  serves  to  pull 
up  the  average  and  to  offset  in  a  measure  the 
very  poor  returns  that  are  received  from  many 
places.  Except  in  Texas,  the  fruit  set  is  below 
the  average  at  this  date.  Boll  weevils  are  not 
numerous  anywhere. 


The  German  Savings  and  Loan  Society 

(THE  GERMAN  BANK) 
~avings  Incorporated  1868  Commercial 

526  CAUFORNIA  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Member  of   the   Associated   Savings  Banks 
of  San  Francisco 

The  following  Branches  for  Receipt  and  Payment  of 
Ueposits  only: 

MISSION   BRANCH,  2572  MISSION  STREET 
Between  21st  and  22nd 

RICHMOND    DISTRICT    BRANCH,   601  CLEMENT 
Corner  of  7th  Avenue 

HAIGHT    ST.    BRANCH,    1456    HAIGHT  ST. 
Near  Masonic  Ave. 


JUNE  29th,  1912: 


Assets   $51,140,101.75 

Capital  actually  paid  up  in  Cash   1,000.000.00 

Reserve  and  Contingent  Funds   1,656.403.80 

Employees'  Pension  Fund   140,109.60 

Number  of  Depositors    56,609 


Office  Hours:  10  o'clock  a.  m.  to  3  o'clock  p.  m.,  ex- 
cept S.iturdays  to  12  o'clock  m.  and  Saturday  evenings 
from  6:.10  p.  m.  to  8  o'clock  p.  m.  for  receipt  of  deposits 
only. 


Telephone   DOUGLAS  2487 


R.   E.  MULCAHY,  Manager 


Members 
New  York  Stock  Exchange 
New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
New  York  Coffee  Exchange 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade 


E.  F.  HUTTON  &  CO. 

THE  PIONEER  HOUSE 

BROKERS 


490  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
Branch,  ST.  FRANCIS  HOTEL 


Two  Private  Wirei  to 
Chicago   and   New  York 

Washington,  D.  C,  1301  F  Str««l 
Los  Angeles.  112  W.  Third  Street 
New   York,  31-33-35   New  Street 


July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


21 


FINANCIAL  NOTES 

Messrs.  Sutro  &  Co.,  the  leading  stock  and 
bond  brokers,  have  removed  to  adjoining  offices 
in  the  Kohl  Building,  at  410  Montgomery  street, 
where  they  have  fitted  up  their  commodious  quart- 
ers in  mahogany.  The  appointments  are  similar 
to  the  uptown  office  of  Sutro  &  Co.  in  the  Met- 
ropolitan Building  at  Manhattan,  N.  Y.,  the  main 
office  being  at  136  Pine  street. 

The  San  Francisco  house  was  established  in 
1858  and  is  the  best  known  firm  on  the  coast. 
The  execution  of  orders  between  New  York  and 
San  Francisco  can  be  made  in  ten  minutes  with 
deliveries  at  the  New  York  correspondents  in  30 
minutes  if  necessary. 

The  market  for  the  past  week  has  not  shown 
any  particular  feature  although  there  were  im- 
portant movements  in  several  issues. 

Alaska  Packers,  by  reason  of  wireless  reports 
from  the  north  to  the  effect  that  the  catch  of 
salmon  should  be  a  large  one,  judging  from  pres- 
ent heavy  runs,  has  moved  up  from  90  to  92^ 
and  looks  strong  at  the  price. 

Pacific  Gas  and  Electric  preferred  is  getting 
close  to  a  high  record.  Ninety-three  and  one-half 
is  freely  bid  for  the  stock  but  there  appears  to 
be  no  stock  for  sale  at  less  than  94J/2.  The  Com- 
mon remains  steady  at  65  to  65J/2. 

Western  Power  securities  have  also  been  strong. 
The  bonds  are  selling  in  good  blocks  at  88j4 
while  the  preferred  moved  up  from  58  to  60. 

Associated  Oil  continues  to  be  absorbed  at 
around  44  and  looks  good  to  cross  this  price 
before  very  long. 

Spring  Valley  remains  unchanged  at  62;4.  the 
bonds  selling  at  93->^. 

The  general  bond  market  has  worked  to  higher 
levels. 

Pacific  Telephone  and  Telegraph  moved  up  to 
lOO'^-lOl,  the  result  of  the  added  equity  afforded 
by  the  recent  issue  of  14,000,000  more  preferred 
stock. 


The  Rag 


Bing — My  wife  is  an  angel. 

Bang — You're  lucky;  mine  is  still  living. 


When  you  rent  a  box  in  the 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

you  have  the  assurance  that  your  valuables 
placed  therein  are  absolutely  safe,  and  all  it 
costs  you  is  $4  per  year. 

Crocker  Safe  Deposit  Vaults  Po^^^nd  Marilai"!*.. 

John  F.  Cunningham,  Manager 


(Continued  from  Page  7.) 
cheeks  of  the  sailors.    His  voice  sounded  in  sup- 
pressed mockery  on  the  commander's  ear. 

"Crying  like  babies  for  that  rag!" 

As  if  he  had  heard  nothing,  Romainville  en- 
tered his  cabin  and  closed  the  door. 

That  night  the  commander  ordered  the  ship's 
company  to  be  ready  to  go  ashore  early  in  the 
morning  to  visit  the  graves  of  two  sailors  who, 
having  died  near  the  harbor,  had  been  carried  to 
land  and  given  burial.  Romainville  held  it  a 
sacred  duty  to  visit  the  graves  of  his  country- 
men and,  if  necessary,  replace  the  wooden  crosses 
habitually  used  by  French  soldiers  to  mark  the 
resting  place  of  the  French  dead. 

The  men  were  on  deck.  The  ship  swung  at 
anchor,  and  at  the  masthead  the  colors  floated 
against  the  deep  blue  sky.  On  the  gray-blue  sea 
tlie  dawn  light  shivered  in  silver  spears. 

Close  to  the  ship's  rail  the  men  stood  waiting. 
Romainville  prepared  them  for  their  solemn  work. 
He  told  them  how  the  two  Frenchmen  had  left 
their  homes  to  lie  down  in  the  shadow  of  the 
African  mountain,  and  with  grave  faces  the  sea- 
men listened. 

The  small  boats  danced  below  the  ship.  The 
men  were  ready.  Romainville.  with  feet  on  the 
ladder,  turned  to  the  master  of  arms. 

"Give  that  parcel  to  Pornic!" 

Pornic,  carrying  the  parcel,  followed  the  com- 
mander, and  the  men  entered  the  boats. 

Back  from  the  shore,  in  a  field  of  ferns,  where 
the  mountain  planted  its  feet  above  the  sea,  under 
a  tangle  of  wild  vines,  they  found  the  graves. 
The  crosses  planted  when  the  men  were  buried 
had  rotted  and  fallen.  Working  fast  in  the  hot 
light  of  the  rising  sun,  the  sailors  made  two  new 
crosses.  When  they  had  set  them  in  the  earth 
one  of  the  men  knelt,  covered  his  face  with  his 
cap  and  bowed  his  head  One  by  one  the  sea- 
men followed  his  example,  until  all  but  Pornic 
were  on  their  knees. 

Knee  deep  in  the  wild  verdure,  troubled  and 
irresolute,  the  little  Breton  stood,  looking  down. 
Sighing  as  the  winds  sigh,  the  tide  lapped  the 
shore;  and  away  up  on  the  mountain  the  eagles 
screamed. 

Romainville  gave  the  men  time  to  repeat  the 
simple  prayers  learned  in  their  villages,  then  he 
took  the  parcel  from  Pornic's  arms,  called  to  the 
master  of  arms  to  give  him  the  staff  left  in  one 
of  the  boats  and  opened  the  parcel. 

It  was  a  flag,  one  of  the  flags  held  in  reserve 
until  needed  for  some  unlocked  for  ceremonial. 

"Pornic!"  called  the  officer. 

"Commander!" 

"Take  this  flag,  nail  it  to  the  staff,  then  set  it 
deep  in  earth  between  those  graves!" 

Pornic  trembled.  He  nailed  the  flag  to  the 
staff;  dug  deep  in  the  ground;  planted  the  flag 
and  braced  it  with  earth  and  stones.  Romain- 


ANGLO  &  LONDON 
PARIS  NATIONAL  BANK 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

Paid-Up     Capital  $  4.000,000 

Surplus  and  Undivided  Profits   $  1.600.000 

Total    Resources   $40,000,000 

OFFICERS 

HERBERT  FLEISHHACKER  President 
SIG  GREENEBAUIVI  Chairman  of  the  Board 

JOS.  FRIEDLANDER  Vice-President 
C.  F.  HUNT  Vice-President 
R.  AI^TSCHUL  Cashier 
C.  R.  PARKER  Assistant  Cashier 

WM    H    HIGH  Assistant  Cashier 

H.  CHOYNSKI  Assistant  Cashier 

G.   R.    BURDICK  Assistant  Cashier 

A.  L.  LANGERMAN  Secretary 


ville  crossed  the  field,  halted  beneath  the  flag, 
stood  for  a  moment  with  head  bowed,  with  his 
cap  in  his  crossed  hands;  then,  calling  the  men  to 
attention,  he  spoke: 

"My  children,  we  are  in  this  silent  place,  alone 
with  the  eternal  mountains  and  the  eternal  sea,  to 
do  the  simplest  of  the  soldier's  duties.  Here 
where  the  voice  of  man  is  never  heard,  two  of 
our  brothers  lie,  far  from  the  land  they  loved; 
and  we,  whom  they  never  knew,  have  come  to  do 
the  work  of  love,  of  memory,  of  the  gratitude  of 
the  country. 

"We  have  marked  these  graves  with  the  Cross 
because  the  soldier's  first  duty  is  to  respect  the 
Nation's  faith.  But  we  must  not  forget  that 
there  is  another  duty  and  another  faith,  the  faith 
that  binds  together  the  believeV  and  the  unbe- 
liever— the  Faith  of  the  Patriot!  Love  of  the 
Country — that  belongs  to  every  one  of  us,  and 
to  all  who  come  after  us. 

"The  Country!  There  is  no  other  word  that 
means  so  much.  It  means  the  plot  of  ground 
where  we  and  all  who  came  before  us  were  born. 
It  means  all  that  we  remember:  the  care-free 
sleep  of  those  early  years;  the  mornings  when  we 
met  around  the  simple  table  to  share  the  good 
things  prepared  for  us  by  the  toil-worn  hands.  It 
means  the  partings,  the  heartache,  the  heroic 
labor — everything,  even  to  the  nation's  blood 
given  freely  to  make  of  us  one  great  family;  a 
family  known  wherever  man  speaks  to  man  as  the 
protector  of  the  weak  and  the  defender  of  the 
wronged. 

"It  means  the  soul  so  individual  and  so  dis- 
tinct that  seeing  it  among  the  nations  the  world 
recognizes  it  as  ours. 

"Strength,  the  integrity  of  the  People — we  mean 
all  that  when  we  say  'Our  Country.' 

"Now  the  country  has  one  representative:  the 
Flag.  The  Flag  stands  for  our  faith,  our  honor, 
our  homes,  our  graves.  It  stands  for  all  that  we 
hold  sacred,  from  the  mothers  bending  over  the 
cradles  to  the  old  ones  bending  towards  the  tomb. 

"The  Country  means  the  People  and  the  Flag 
means  the  Country.  And  so,  to  honor  them  who 
died  in  the  service  of  the  Country,  we  leave  the 
Flag  to  float  above  these  graves,  until,  worn  by 
time  and  by  tempest,  it  falls  to  mingle  with  the 
atoms  of  the  dust.  We  leave  it  in  place  of  them 
who  cannot  murmur  here  their  love  and  sorrow. 
In  its  folds  the  spirit  of  our  land  will  linger  in 
the  sighing  of  the  wind,  in  the  voices  of  the  sea 
and  in  the  silence,  to  keep  watch  for  the  country; 
to  guard  the  eternal  sleep  of  them  who  walk  the 
earth  no  more." 

Through  the  tangled  vines  the  seamen  followed 
their  commander  to  the  boats,  and  solemnly,  in 
silence,  they  climbed  the  ladder  to  the  ship. 

At  sunset,  when  the  men  were  swarming  to 
salute  the  tricolor,  Romainville  opened  his  door. 

Pornic,  with  arms  crossed  before  his  face, 
l)arred  tlie  way. 

"What  is  it?"  asked  the  commander.  "Have 
you  come  to  tell  me  that  you  refuse  to  stand 
with  us  when  we  salute  that  rag?  .  .  .  No! 
no!  Pornic!  Not  there!"  For  Pornic  had  fallen 
at  his  feet. 


Citizens'    Alliance    of    San  Francisco 

OPEN  SHOP 

More  Ihnn  fifty  per  cent  of  tlu* 
union  mcml)ershit)  is  licld  in  line  by 
threats  of  physical  violence. 

The  Citizens  Alliances'  offices  are 
in  the  Russ  Bldg.,  Nos.  363-364-355. 
SaT)  Francisco,  Cal.  The  Free  Regis- 
tration Bureau  tor  labor  of  all  kinds  is 
located  here,  and  open  to  all. 


7 


22 


TOWN  TALK 


July  27,  1912 


SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,026; 
Department  No.  10. 

H  CILE  V.  LARM,  Plaintiff,  vs.  G.  LARM,  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
ci?5co,  and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California,  Send  Greeting  to : 
C  Larm.  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  Required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
filed  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  Summons,  if  served 
within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere  within 
thirty  days. 

The  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and 
decree  of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony 
now  existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  Wilful  Desertion  and  Habitual  Intemperance; 
also  for  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in  the 
Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby  made. 

.^nd  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take  judg- 
ment for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the  Com- 
plaint as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court 
for  any  other  relief  demanded   in  the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San   Francisco,  this  27th  day  of  .\pril,  A.   D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MI'LCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH.  Deputy  Clerk. 
McGOWAN  and  WESTLAKE,  Attys.  for  Plaintiff, 

Hum  boldt   Bank  Bide..  San  Francisco.  Cal.  6-1-10 


AUTO  NOTES 

Seventy-five  salesmen  of  The  Thomas  B.  Jef- 
fery  Company,  representing  every  State  in  the 
Union,  participated  last  week  in  the  annual  con- 
vention of  the  organization  at  the  factory  in 
Kenosha,  Wis.  The  salesmen  spent  three  days 
at  the  plant  where  are  made  86  per  cent  of  the 
parts  that  go  into  the  Cross  Country  car.  While 
the  announcement  of  the  1913  Cross  Country  has 
net  yet  been  made  the  most  important  develop- 
ment of  the  conference  was  a  statement  of  the 
tremendous  increase  of  business  during  the  past 
year.  In  the  report  which  dealt  with  the  subject 
it  is  shown  that  the  increase  in  sales  of  Cross 
Countrys  for  1912,  as  against  the  model  of  the 
same  p(}wer  in  1911,  was  126  per  cent.  In  the 
number  of  cars  shipped,  1912  showed  an  increase 
of  20  per  cent  over  the  biggest  previous  year.  In 
dollars  and  cents  the  1912  increase  over  that  of 
1911  was  33  1-3  per  cent.  The  increase  in  the 
number  of  dealers  who  represent  the  Jeflfery  com- 
pany was  shown  to  be  over  100  per  cent.  The 
s.'ilrsmen  were  told  by  officers  of  tlie  company 
that  during  the  coming  year  the  factory  will 
increase  its  product  60  per  cent.  Tiiis  is  made 
possible  by  the  perfected  equipment  of  the  factory 
which  has  a  floor  area  of  twenty-three  acres,  and 
because  of  the  efficiency  of  an  organization  which 
has  reprcsentatif)n  in  every  civilized  country  in 
the  world. 


Chambers — So  Cashier  Morral  has  gone  wrong? 
They  say  he  has  been  stealing  for  fifteen  years. 

Murray — Why,  when  they  investigated  his  books 
a  j'ear  ago  1  thought  he  came  out  of  the  ordeal 
unspotted. 

Chambers — He   did,   but   they've    spotted  him 


Pacific  Printing  Co, 

Catalogue,  Pamphlet,  Commercial 
and  Law  Work. 

PRINTERS 


PHONE: 
DOUGLAS  2612 

88   FIRST  STREET 


ORDER   TO    SHOW    CAUSE   WHY    SALE    OF  REAL 

REAL  EoTATE  SHOULD  NOT  BE  MADE 
in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  12,438; 
Uepariment  No.  10. 
In    the    Matter   of   the    Estate   of   MAJOR  CONWAY, 
Deceased. 

Annie  Conway,  the  Administratrix  of  the  estate  of  Major 
Conway,  deceased,  having  filed  in  this  Court  her  petition 
for  an  order  to  sell  the  real  estate  of  said  decedent  for 
the  purposes  therein  set  forth,  and  it  appearing  Irom  said 
petitiun  that  it  is  necessary  to  sell  the  whole  or  some  por- 
tion ul  said  real  estate,  and  good  cause  appearing  there- 
for, 

iNow  therefore,  it  is  hereby  ordered,  adjudged  and  decreed 
that  all  persons  interested  in  the  said  estate  of  said  Major 
Cunway,  deceased,  be  and  appear  before  the  above  en- 
titled Court,  Department  No.  lU  thereof,  on  Wednesday, 
the  31st  day  ot  July,  lyiJ,  at  10  o'clock  a.  m.  of  said  day, 
at  the  Courtroom  of  said  Court,  Room  No.  519,  in  the 
lempurary  City  Hall  on  Market  Street  near  Eighth  Street, 
m  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  Stale  of  Cali- 
fornia, then  and  there  to  show  cause  why  an  order  should 
nut  be  granted  to  the  said  Administratrix  to  sell  the  whole 
or  some  portion  of  the  real  estate  of  said  deceased. 

It  IS  further  ordered  that  a  copy  of  said  order  be  pub- 
lished lor  at  least  tour  successive  weeks  in  '"Town  Talk,  ' 
a  newspaper  printed  and  published  in  the  said  City  and 
County  oi  San  Francisco. 

uone  in  open  Court  this  21st  day  of  June,  1912. 

(Signed;        THuMAS  F.  GRAHAM. 

Judge. 

ll^Lili   K.   McKEVlTT,  Atty.  for  Administratrix, 

Hearst  liltlg.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-29-3 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and 
for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  43,03o; 
IJepartmeni  No.  10. 

LOL  ETTA  WILMOTH,  Plaintiff,  vs.  HOWARD 
WELLINGTON  WILMUTH.  Defendant. 

Action  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  Complaint  filed  in  the  ofHce  of  the  County 
Cltrk  ot  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Howard  'Wellington   W  ilmoth,  Defendant. 

Vou  are  hereby  required  to  appear  in  an  action  brought 
against  you  by  the  above  named  Plaintiff  in  the  Superior 
Court  ot  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and 
County  of  San  Francisco,  and  to  answer  the  Complaint 
hied  therein  within  ten  days  (exclusive  of  the  day  of 
service)  after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons,  if 
served  within  this  City  and  County;  or  if  served  elsewhere 
Within    thirty  days. 

'Ihe  said  action  is  brought  to  obtain  a  judgment  and  de- 
cree of  this  Court  dissolving  the  bonds  of  matrimony  now 
existing  between  plaintiff  and  defendant,  on  the  ground 
of  defendant's  willful  desertion  and  willful  neglect  of  plain* 
tiff;  also  for  general  relief,  as  will  more  fully  appear  in 
the  Complaint  on  file,  to  which  special  reference  is  hereby 
made. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that,  unless  you  appear 
and  answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  moneys  or  damages  demanded  in  the 
Complaint  as  arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the 
Court   for   any   other   relief   demanded   in   the  Complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  Seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County 
of  San  Francisco,  this  26th  day  of  June,  A.  1).  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  I.  MLLCREVY,  Clerk. 

By  L.  J.  WELCH,  Deputy  Clerk. 
M.   M.  GETZ,  ROBINSON  &  GETZ,  Atty.  for  Plaintiff, 
45  Kearny  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  6-29-10 

NOTICE  TO  CREDITORS 

Estate  of  LI  PPM  AX  X  SACHS,  Deceased -.\o.  16,663, 
N.  S. ;  Department  No.  10. 
Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  undersigned,  Mary  Sachs 
and  Albert  Baruch,  Executors  of  the  Last  Will  and  Testa- 
ment of  Lippmann  Sachs,  deceased,  to  the  creditors  of  and 
all  persons  having  claims  against  the  said  deceased,  to  ex- 
hibit them  with  the  necessary  vouchers  within  ten  (10) 
niijiiths  after  the  first  publication  of  this  notice  to  the  said 
Executors  at  the  office  of  Heller,  Powers  ^:  Ehrman,  Room 
713  Nevada  Bank  Building,  No.  14  Montgomery  Street, 
San  Francisco,  California,  which  said  office  the  undersigned 
select  as  their  place  of  business  in  all  matters  connected  with 
the  said  estate  of  Lippmann  Sachs,  deceased. 

MARY  SACHS, 
ALBERT  BARUCH, 
Executors  of  the   Last   Will   and  Testament  of  Lippmann 
Sachs,  Deceased. 
Dated:   July    13.  1912. 
HELLER.  POWERS  .S:  EHRMAN, 
.\ttorneys  for  Executors, 

Nevada  Bank  Bldg.,  San  Francisco.  7-13-5 

SUMMONS 

In  the  Superior  Co-irt  of  the  State  of  Caliiornia,  in  and  tui 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco — No.  42,177 ; 
Department  No.  10. 

CLARA  JESSURUN,  Plaintiff,  vs.  WALTER  S.  J  ES- 
Sl  RLN,  Defendant. 

,\ction  brought  in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of 
California,  in  and  for  the  City  and  County  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  the  complaint  filed  in  the  office  of  the  County 
Clerk  of  said  City  and  County. 

The  People  of  the  State  of  California  Send  Greeting  to: 
Walter  S.  Jessurun.  Defendant. 

You  are  hereby  directed  to  appear  and  answer  the  com- 
plaint in  an  action  entitled  as  above  brought  against  you 
in  the  Superior  Court  of  the  State  of  California,  in  and  for 
the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  within  ten  days 
after  the  service  on  you  of  this  summons — if  served  within 
this  City  and  County;  or  within  thirty  days  if  served  else- 
where. 

And  you  are  hereby  notified  that  unless  you  appear  and 
answer  as  above  required,  the  said  Plaintiff  will  take 
judgment  for  any  money  or  damages  in  the  complaint  as 
arising  upon  contract,  or  will  apply  to  the  Court  for  any 
other  relief  demanded  in  the  complaint. 

Given  under  my  hand  and  the  seal  of  the  Superior  Court 
at  the  City  and  County  of  San  Francisco,  State  of  Cali- 
fornia, this  7th  day  of  May,  A.   D.  1912. 

(Seal)  H.  1.  MLLCREVY.  Clerk. 

By  H.  1.  PORTER,  Deputy  Clerk. 
HENRY   ACH.   Atty.   for  Plaintiff, 

Rooms   316-320   Balboa   Building.   Southeast   Corner  ol 
Market  and  Second  Sts.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.  5-18-10 


I  hones.    Pacific    Douglas   4113;    Home  C2519 
Typcvi'riters  Rented  and  Inspected 

WALTER  J.  WOLF 

Rebuilt  Typewriters 
Expert  Repairing 

SUPPLIES  FOR  ALL  MAKES  OF  MACHINES 
CARBON    PAPERS   AND   OFFICE  SUPPLIES 

307  Bush  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 


VALUABLE  INFORMATION 

Of  a  Business,  Personal  or  Social  Nature 
from  the  Press  of  the  Pacific  Coast 

DAKES'  PRESS  CLIPPING  BUREAU 

12  GEARY  STREET.  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phones,  Kearny  1440  and  Home  C  1470 

432  S.  MAIN  STREET,  LOS  ANGELES 

rhones,  F  1289  and  Main  413J 

Clippings  Served  from  Sc  to  $S  per  Month 
Order  Now.    Stop  When  You  Please 
Pay  for  What  Vou  Get 


Office  rhone.  Kearny  57    Residence  Phone,  Market  4853 

DR.  A.  H.  WRIGHT 


1  to  4  and  7  to  8 


CHRONICLE  BLDG. 


KNIGHT  &.  HEGGERTY 

Attorneys  at  Law  and  Proctors  in  Admiralty 
CROCKER   BUILDING  Rooms  807-810 

Telephone  Kearny  4145 


HENRY  P.  TRICOU 

NOTARY  PUBLIC 
508  CALIFORNIA  ST.  Phone  Kearny  371 

Residence.  882  Grove  St.    Phone  Park  1870 


NEWSPAPER  ART  LEAGUE 

Commercial  Art  and  Commercial 
Photography  of  All  Kinds 

Speculative  Drawings  and  Bids  Submitted  upon  Request 

185  STEVENSON  STREET 

ROOMS  306-308  Phone  Suiter  1024 


5%  Per  Month 

SAVED  on  the  Investment  by  Buying 

THE 

ALASKA  REFRIGERATOR 

900,000  SOLD  SINCE  1878 

W'e    have    a   Tc^t    Refrigerator   to   prove    what  we 
claim  for  it.    I'lease  call  and  see  it. 

Pacific  Coast  Agents 

W.  W.  MONTAGUE  &  CO. 

557-5C3  MARKET  ST.  SAN  FRANCISCO 


Patrick  &  Company 

RUBBER  STAMPS 

Stencils,  Seals,  Signs,  Etc. 

560  Market  Street  San  FranciKo 


July  27,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


23 


Letters 


Mrs.  Atherton's  Latest  Novel 

If  analogy  had  anything  to  do  with  book  titles 
one  might  surmise  that  "Julia  France  and  Her 
Times"  had  something  to  do  with  by-gone  his- 
tory, but  not  a  bit  of  it.  Julia  is  more  modern 
than  the  day  after  tomorrow  and  her  times  are 
right  here  and  now.  Small  wonder  that  her 
creator  Gertrude  Atherton  excused  herself  from 
])articipating  in  the  recent  big  suffrage  parade  in 
New  York  because:  "I  feel  that  in  writing  my 
latest  book,  'Jul'a  France,'  I  have  done  more  for 
suffrage  than  in  marching.  I  am  going  to  watcl; 
the  glorious  sight  and  thrill  with  pride."  If  one 
accepts  the  Athertonian  doctrine  it's  all  up  with 
tyrant  man  and  the  sooner  he  admits  defeat  the 
better.  But  let  us  start  fair.  Julia  Edis  was 
born  on  the  island  of  Nevis.  Her  father  had  drunk 
himself  to  death  after  dissipating  his  fortune, 
and  his  only  surviving  son  was  doing  his  level 
best  to  emulate  the  parental  example,  so  although 
Mrs.  Edis  and  her  chaming  daughter  were  island 
quality,  they  were  as  poor  as  the  traditional 
Thanksgiving  bird  of  the  patient  Job.  Mrs.  Edis 
still  cherished  a  broche  shawl  for  gala  attire,  and 
when  Julia  attended  her  very  first  party,  at 
eighteen,  she  wore  a  white  muslin  frock  and  a 
washed  blue  sash.  Even  the  most  casual  reader 
may  judge  from  that  the  sort  of  a  lost  corner 
existence  she  had  led.  Mrs.  Edis  was  a  tyrannical 
old  dragon  past  her  sixtieth  year.  For  forty 
years  she  had  remained  on  her  ancestral  island 
wrapped  up  in  the  study  of  astrology  which  took 
the  place  with  her  of  religion.  ])-ilitics.  society, 
clubdom,  gossip  and  shopping  The  only  creature 
for  whom  she  felt  or  professed  a  particle  of  in- 
terest or  affection  was  Julia,  and  that  less  out  of 
love  for  her  child  than  of  admiration  for  her 
great  destiny  With  the  aid  of  an  old  French 
resident,  long  since  dead,  the  girl's  horoscope  had 
been  cast  again  and  again,  and  the  requisite  data 
sent  abroad  to  other  professors  of  the  starry 
science  with  always  the  one  result,  that  the  child 
was  destined  for  a  wonderful  career  and  the  at- 
tainment of  the  highest  rank  To  Mrs.  Edis  there 
was  just  one  country  in  all  the  world,  England, 
and  just  one  rank  worthy  of  attainment.  Since 
modern  laws  prohibited  the  possibility  of  a  com- 
moner reaching  the  throne,  it  must  be  that  Julia 
would  become  a  duchess,  and  though  she  was  not 
actively  trained  to  assume  the  rank  and  privileges 
her  mother  did  the  next  best  thing  and  prohibited 
anything  that  might  interfere  with  the  perfection 
of  that  ideal.  The  girl  had  no  comrades  of  either 
sex,  no  books  and  no  active  pleasures.  Though 
other  West  Indian  girls  began  their  social  careers 
at  sixteen  she  was  held  back  until  the  propitious 
occasion  foretold  by  the  stars.  And  now  it  had 
arrived.  No  less  than  three  British  cruisers  were 
anchored  in  the  roadstead  and  Julia,  despite  her 
washed  ribbons,  was  the  belle  of  her  first  ball. 
-Acting  as  lieutenant  on  one  of  the  vessels  was 
Harold  France,  forty-odd  years  of  age,  dissipated 
and  disreputable  to  such  degree  that  his  ship- 


mates refused  to  associate  with  him  when  not  on 
duty,  but  heir  presumptive  to  a  dukedom.  He 
was  attracted  by  the  fresh  young  girl,  and  Mrs. 
Edis  was  enchanted  with  the  fulfillment  of  the 
astrological  prediction.  The  captain  of  the  ship 
attempted  to  give  her  some  well  meant  advice 
born  of  his  knowledge  of  his  officer  and  the 
pathological  history  of  the  France  clan  but  it 
was  worse  than  useless.  In  the  course  of  a  few 
days,  when  the  pastor  of  the  only  church  hap- 
pened to  make  a  providential  call  simultaneously 
with  the  prospective  groom,  Julia  was  told  to 
stand  up  and  be  married,  which  she  did  without 
question  or  demur.  Then  the  squadron  sailed  at 
once,  without  time  for  even  farewell  ceremonial, 
and  the  unsophisticated  bride  was  packed  off  to 
London  on  the  next  Royal  Mail,  to  put  in  time 
with  an  aunt  and  learn  something  about  modern 
living.  This  aunt  was  the  antithesis  of  Julia's 
mother,  and  Julia  was  dropped  into  the  bosom  of 
the  smartest  set,  where  every  woman  was  as  a 
matter  of  course  dissatisfied  with  the  husband  she 
had  married  for  money,  and  every  man  dis- 
illusioned with  his  matrimonial  partner  on  some 
ground  or  other,  and  no  establishment  was  com- 
plete without  a  lover  or  two  dangling  about.  But 
by  and  by  the  Boer  war  came  along  and  provi- 
dentially removed  all  the  undesirable  males,  leav- 
ing the  way  clear  for  new  alliances,  all  planned 
before  hand.  This  time  Julia's  luck  was  not  with 
her,  for  France  proved  to  be  more  undesirable 
than  all  the  rest,  ill-tempered,  niggardly  and 
vicious,  but  he  didn't  die.  He  came  back  and  went 
insane  but  nobody  would  believe  it  until  he 
attempted  to  murder  his  cousin,  the  holder  of  the 
title,  who,  instead  of  dying  off  comfortably  as 
he  should  have  done,  married  and  had  legitimate 
heirs.  France  had  to  be  confined  to  an  asylum, 
and  it  looked  seriously  as  though  the  '^tars  had 
got  a  bit  mixed  up  in  their  courses  and  the  grand 
career  was  side  tracked  if  not  completely  wrecked. 
Wanting  an  outlet  for  their  energies,  two  of  the 
intimate  friends  of  the  disappointed  duchess  had 
gone  in  for  militant  suffragism.  One  of  them  had 
already  proved  her  superiority  to  the  tyrant  man 
whom  she  had  married  for  money  in  exchange  for 
the  social  position  she  had  to  dispose  of  by  open- 
ing a  Bond  street  bonnet  shop,  where,  without 
practical  experience  in  the  skilled  trade  and  no 
knowledge  of  business  whatever,  she  made  a 
phenomenal  success  and  an  independent  fortune. 
When  Julia  had  been  married  about  three  years, 
and  was  quite  tired  of  her  troublesome  husband 
though  still  convinced  that  she  was  to  be  a 
duchess,  there  came  to  her  part  of  the  world 
a  party  of  touring  Americans,  a  married  lady  with 
her  little  sister  and  brother  in  tow.  They  were 
San  Francisco  millionaires.  The  boy  was  a  tall 
lad  of  fifteen  who  fell  in  love  with  the  duchess- 
to-be,  begged  her  to  let  down  her  hair  on  the 
housetop  that  he  might  admire  it,  divined  her 
unhappy  domestic  condition  and  promptly  offered 
to  elope  with  her.  As  soon  as  the  objectionable 
France  had  been  safely  disposed  of,  the  laws 
prohibiting  another  marriage  while  he  lived,  and 
the  cousin  being  willing  to  continue  the  family 


allowance,  Julia  hied  herself  to  the  Orient  to 
delve  into  mysticism  and  in  four  years  she  be- 
came an  adept,  having  exhausted  the  occultism 
of  India,  Persia  and  Arabia.  It  was  while  sitting 
at  the  feet  of  the  Hadji  Sadra  that  she  made  her 
great  discovery — that  the  militant  suffragettes  are 
immortal  spirits,  soulless  and  sexless,  liberated 
on  earth  when  they  have  work  to  do,  disappear- 
ing when  it  is  accomplished,  leaving  none  of  their 
kind  behind  them.  Then  that  horoscope  was 
revised  and  corrected.  Instead  of  a  ridiculous 
position  in  the  peerage  of  England,  our  charming 
heroine  was  not  only  one  of  these  great  im- 
mortals but  the  chief  of  the  band,  destined  to 
rule  her  sex  and  lead  it  to  victory.  Julia  goes 
back  to  London  and  into  the  thick  of  the  fight. 
The  first  news  which  greeted  the  immortal  on 
her  return  to  England  was  the  report  of  our 
earthquake  and  fire.  The  news  reminded  Julia 
of  little  Daniel  Tay  and  forthwith  she  wrote  him 
a  long  letter  pretending,  like  any  ordinary  woman, 
that  she  had  never  for  one  moment  forgotten  him. 
Time  had  been  passing,  and  the  little  kid  of  fifteen 
is  now  thirty,  yet  he  swallowed  the  bait,  and  any 
way  he  had  been  saving  himself  up  for  her.  It 
wasn't  very  long  before  he  turned  up  in  London 
and  did  soine  red-hot  love  making,  both  there  and 
in  Munich.  There  is  nothing  slow  about  Daniel 
Tay.  and  in  the  intervals  of  telling  all  about  our 
graft  prcisecution  he  arranges  for  a  Reno  divorce. 
Meanwhile  Nevis  has  been  looking  up  a  bit  and 
with  a  big  summer  hotel  it  is  something  of  a 
resort.  Instead  of  Reno  post  haste  Julia  decided 
to  make  a  visit  to  her  mother,  who,  bereft  of  her 
faith  in  astrology,  has  been  living  a  lonely  and 
disappointed  life  in  active  seclusion.  Kind  friends 
had  warned  Daniel  Tay  that  France  might  die  at 
any  moment,  so  he  too  started  for  Nevis  and  landed 
there  from  New  York  several  days  before  Julia 
arrived.  Old  Mrs.  Edis,  as  tyrannical  as  ever, 
hears  now  for  the  first  time  of  the  suffragette 
movement  and  of  the  insignificant  and  common- 
place station  of  a  mere  duchess  as  compared  with 
the  honors  and  glories  of  a  militant  leader.  She 
is  rejoiced  not  only  in  the  great  achievement  of 
her  daughter  but  in  the  restoration  of  her  beloved 
science,  since  it  has  been  not  astrology  but  its 
interpretation  which  was  wrong.  The  wicked 
husband  really  does  die  at  last  and  the  marriage 
follows.  You  may  "stick  in  your  thumb  and 
pull  out  a  plum"  from  "Julia  France  and  Her 
Times."  There's  smart  society  and  politics,  both 
English  and  Ainerican,  suffragism  and  occultisin, 
(he  East  and  the  West,  smart  frocks  in  London 
and  dowdy  pre-Victorianism  in  Nevis,  Religion 
and  "Science,"  Socialism  and  literature  and 
flirtation.    From  the  Macmillan  Company. 


Wilde's  Club  Motto 

.\t  the  Owls'  Club  in  London  one  night  Willie 
Wilde,  the  brother  of  Oscar,  was  asked  by  Sir 
George  Power  to  write  a  couplet  as  a  motto  for 
the  club.    In  a  minute  Willie  produced  this: 

We  fly  by  night,  and  this  resolve  we  make, 

1  f  the  dawn  breaks,  then  let  the  damn  thing  break. 


DO  YOUR  EYES  TROUBLE  YOU? 

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Mayerle's  German  Eye-Water,  the  greatest  eye  tonic  in  the  world,  at  reliable  druggists. 
50c,  or  by  mail  from  San  Francisco,  6Sc. 

When  your  eye-glasses  or  spectacles  blur  or  tire  the  eyes,  wipe  them  with  Mayerle's  An- 
tiseptic eye-glass  cleaner.  This  is  a  specially  prepared  chemical  cloth  for  polishing  lenses, 
opera,  field  and  marine  glasses. 

It  removes  all  stains  and  blemishes  immediately  without  svr.atching.    By  mail,  3  for  25c. 

Establuhed  18  Years.    Always  look  (or  the  name,  Mayerle 


George  Mayerle 


GERMAN  OPTICAL  INSTITUTE 
960  MARKET  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO 


OCEAN  SHORE  RAILROAD 

"Reaches  the  Beaches" 

NEW  SERVICE 

8  TRAINS  DAILY    12  TRAINS  SUNDAY 

TD  AINC  I  i:  AVC  3  P.M.       EXTRA  SUNDAY  TRAINS 

IKAlnO  LtAVt.  joaM.   5:45P.M.    6:55A.M.      1:30  P.M. 

DEPOT 
Twelfth  and  Mission  Streets 
San  Franciaco 


PACIFIC  PRI.VTINr,  CO 


88  FIRST  ST  .  s  F 


Vol.  XX.    No.  1041 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  AUGUST  §,  15 


PRICE,  10  CENTS 


TOWN  TALK 


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Proprietor 
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Edward  Rolkin.  Mgr. 


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TOWN  TALK 

THE   PACIFIC  WEEKLY 


Vol.  XX 


Published  Weekly  by 
PACIFIC  PUBLICATION  COMPANY  (Inc.) 
88  First  Street.  San  Francisco 
Phone  Douglas  2612 

Theodore    F.    Bonnet  Editor 

Chas.  W.  Raymond  Business  Manager 


SUBSCRIPTION— One  year,  in  advance,  $4.00;  six 
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The  trade  supplied  direct  by  us. 

For  foreign  and  local  advertising  rates  address  88  First 
street,  San  Francisco. 

New  York  office,  37-39  East  Twenty-eighth  street.  Frederic 
M.   Krugler,  representative. 

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We  decline  to  return  or  to  enter  into  correspondence  as 
to  rejected  communications;  and  to  this  rule  we  can  make 
no  exception.  Manuscripts  not  acknowledged  within  four 
weeks  are  rejected. 


Brother  Rowell  Denies 

Quoting  Town  Talk  to  the  effect  that  he 
was  no  small  part  of  the  iniquity  of  the 
Santa  Cruz  convention  Chester  Rowell  asks, 
"How  long  will  it  take  for  that  old  lie  to 
down?"  And  he  takes  occasion  in  the  Re- 
publican to  deny  that  either  himself  or  his 
uncle  the  late  Dr.  Rowell  took  any  part  in 
the  convention.  He  would  have  us  under- 
stand that  his  is  the  final  word  on  the  sub- 
ject; for  he  says,  "Let  those  contemporaries 
who  persist  in  misrepresenting"  the  facts  be 
informed  so  that  if  they  repeat  the  mis- 
statement it  may  be  known  that  they  do  so 
in  malice  and  not  merely  in  ignorance." 
Thus  are  we  enabled  to  glimpse  the  right- 
eous Fresno  editor  from  his  own  viewpoint. 
Obviously  he  assumes  that  wdien  he  speaks 
the  whole  State  takes  notice  and  is  assured 
forever  that  whoever  utters  himself  to  the 
contrary  is  a  liar.  Behold  O  reader!  the 
stainless  man  in  his  own  conceit.  Heaven 
has  made  him  little  lower  than  the  gods. 
He  is  a  proverb  and  a  last  word  among  all 
the  people.  Brother  Rowell  puzzleth  us. 
For  seeing  that  we  have  repeated  this  great 
slander  many  times  through  the  years  we 
wonder  why  the  victim  thereof  held  tight 
his  lips  till  Death  snatched  from  our  midst 
two  men  who  figured  in  the  Santa  Cruz  con- 
vention, one  of  whom  was  the  uncle  of 
Brother  Rowell,  the  other,  our  authority. 
There  is  a  time  to  be  born  and  a  time  to 
deny,  and  there  is  an  interval  between  these 
two  times  of  infinite  importance,  as  Colonel 
Roosevelt  learned  after  the  death  of  Harri- 
man.  However,  we  shall  never  again  ac- 
cuse Brother  Rowell  of  being  part  of  the 
iniquity  of  the  Santa  Cruz  convention. 
Brother  Rowell  still  lives,  and  the  Ethiopian 
cannot  change  his  skin,  nor  the  leopard  his 
spots.  We  shall  continue  to  observe 
Brother  Rowell  without  malice. 


A  Matter  of  Curiosity 

Why  Colonel  Roosevelt  is  warming  the 


San  Francisco,  August  3,  1912 


Presidential  bee  again  and  what  he  purposes 
doing  in  the  event  of  his  election  everybody 
knows.  At  least,  everybody  knows  the 
Colonel's  answers  to  these  questions.  He 
has  told  us  repeatedly  that  he  has  con- 
secrated himself  to  the  business  of  propping 
the  falling  pillars  of  the  Republic  and  that 
it  is  his  purpose  to  mend,  repair,  reform  and 
revolutionize  the  politics  and  the  commer- 
cial system  of  his  country.  In  other  words, 
the  Colonel  according  to  his  own  conception 
is  our  volunteer  redeemer,  and  it  is  up  to 
us  to  embrace  him  or  reject  him.  This  is 
the  simple  statement  of  the  matter,  and 
those  who  have  faith  in  him  have  no  ques- 
tions to  ask.  To  them,  the  millions  of  his 
worshipers,  he  is  a  burning  and  a  shining 
light,  in  whom  they  have  the  faith  which 
is  "the  substance  of  things  hoped  for,  the 
evidence  of  things  not  seen,"  and  there  is 
not  a  doubting  Thomas  among  them.  Suffi- 
cient for  them  his  mere  assertion  that  like 
Mahomet  he  takes  celestial  journeys,  that 
occasionally  he  walks  on  the  waters  of 
Oyster  Bay,  or  that  the  platform  of  the  Bull 
Moose  party  was  handed  to  him  by  God  in 
a  cloud  on  Sagamore  Hill.  In  the  face  of 
such  faith,  which  in  itself  seems  like  prima 
facie  evidence  of  grace,  we  have  hardly  the 
hardihood  to  be  sceptical.  With  all  due 
deference  we  have  but  the  temerity  to  be 
curious.  How  is  he  going  to  do  all  these 
things?  This  is  our  only  question.  It  is 
clear  enough  that  if  it  is  his  purpose  to 
change  the  whole  aspect  of  affairs  politically, 
commercially  and  socially  he  ra.ust  begin  by 
suspending  the  Constitution.  For  with  the 
Constitution  in  full  force  and  effect  there  is 
an  insuperable  barrier  in  the  path  of  him 
who  would  ride  rough  shod  over  the  institu- 
tions of  his  country.  To  work  a  political 
metamorphosis  the  magician  must  first  as- 
sume the  powers  of  a  Dictator  and  then  rope 
and  throw  the  Congress  and  gag  the  judi- 
ciary. Let  us  not  be  understood  as  suggest- 
ing either  the  impossibility  or  impropriety 
of  such  a  proceeding.  We  believe  that 
Colonel  Roosevelt  has  the  capacity  and  the 
will  for  the  great  consummation,  and  we 
doubt  not  that  many  of  his  followers  would 
be  pleased  to  see  him  go  the  distance.  We 
are  not  even  prepared  to  say  that  the  na- 
tional mind  is  not  ripe  for  the  measure  of 
political  reform,  for  the  great  improvement 
in  the  management  of  public  affairs,  which 
the  Colonel  has  outlined.  The  national 
mind  is  certainly  in  a  receptive  mood  toward 
the  Bull  Moose  candidate.  If  the  people 
were  allowed  to  elect  a  President  by  direct 
popular  vote  in  November  Colonel  Roose- 
velt would  probably  walk  leisurely  into  the 
White  House.  If  he  is  to  be  beaten  it  is  to 
be  by  the  bad  politicians  under  the  system 


No.  1041 


that  curbs  the  people,  the  system  under 
which  the  bad  politicians  gave  us  Lincoln, 
Cleveland,  McKinley  and  other  molly- 
coddles. 


The  Glass  Case 

A  decision  by  the  Supreme  Court  of  South 
Carolina  becomes  of  local  interest  now  that 
Judge  Lawlor  has  refused  to  dismiss  the  in- 
dictments against  Louis  Glass,  formerly 
manager  of  the  telephone  company.  Glass 
was  tried  at  a  time  when  public  feeling 
against  the  higher-ups  was  at  white  heat. 
During  the  trial  what  are  known  as  "mob 
demonstrations"  were  of  daily  occurrence  in 
the  neighborhood  of  the  courtroom.  In  con- 
stant attendance  at  the  trial  was  an  audience 
large  enough  to  gladden  the  heart  of  Judge 
Lawlor  even  in  a  campaign  year.  The  court- 
room was  packed  to  the  doors  by  men  and 
women  in  sympathy  with  the  prosecution. 
They  overflowed  the  space  reserved  for  the 
public  and  pressed  against  the  jury-box. 
Their  sentiments  they  indicated  by  murmurs 
of  approval  whenever  the  prosecuting  at- 
torney took  rhetorical  flights  on  waves  of 
emotion,  and  through  the  open  window  came 
vagrant  expressions  of  public  opinion  from 
the  mob  beneath.  Through  it  all  Judge 
Lawlor  was  quiescent  and  complaisant. 
Louis  Glass  was  convicted.  Also  he  was 
given  a  new  trial,  but  not  on  the  ground  that 
the  mob  was  permitted  to  influence  the  jury. 
There  were  other  grounds  of  reversal.  And 
so  the  South  Carolina  decision  is  of  local  in- 
terest, because  the  point  of  it  is  that  an  over- 
crowded courtroom  is  ground  for  reversal. 
This  decision  was  rendered  in  a  murder  case. 
The  whole  community  was  hostile  to  the 
accused.  The  courtroom  during  the  trial 
as  we  learn  from  the  decision  presented  a 
scene  similar  to  that  which  Judge  Lawlor 
joyously  presided  over  in  the  Glass  case. 
!-^ays  the  court:  "Courts  cannot  control  pub- 
lic sentiment,  but  their  commis.sion  from  the 
|)eople  is  to  keep  the  inviolable  precincts  of 
the  prisoner's  dock,  the  counsel's  place,  the 
witness  chair,  the  jury's  seats  and  the  in- 
tor\cning  sjiace  free  from  either  hostile  or 
friendly  invasion  or  intrusion,  lest  the  ac- 
cused be  terrified  or  his  counsel  confused  in 
making  his  defense,  lest  the  witnesses  tes- 
tify falsely  under  fear  of  inducement,  lest 
the  jury  be  overawed  or  their  minds  in- 
fluenced by  an  atmosphere  surcharged  with 
hostility  or  partiality."  Our  principal  pur- 
l)nse  in  (|Uoting  this  decision  is  to  bring  it 
to  the  attention  of  Judge  Lawlor,  who  other- 
wise would  not  be  likely  to  see  it,  as  the 
only  law  he  reads  is  in  the  codes.  After 
reading  it  Judge  Lawlor  may  conclude  that 
it  would  be  useless  to  try  Louis  Glass  again, 
for  he  must  know  that  a  verdict  of  guilty  can 
be  obtained  only  from  a  terrified  jury. 


4 


TOWN  TALK 


August  3,  1912 


Speeches  Worth  Reading 

The  Congressional  Record  of  July  18  is 
an    exceptional    number.    Throughout  the 
year  the  Congressional  Record  is  a  model  of 
dulness,  but  this  particular  number  which 
contains  the  speeches  of  William  Lorimer  in 
his  own  defense  is  full  of  interesting  matter. 
It  is  a  paper  worth  reading.    Indeed  it  is 
a  paper  that  ought  to  be  read  by  every 
citizen  of  the  United  States;  and  it  is  to 
be  hoped  that  the  Lorimer  speeches  will  be 
published  in  pamphlet  form  and  very  widely 
distributed.    The  speeches  are  valuable  for 
the  information  they  contain  about  men  and 
matters  of  current  interest.    They  are  really 
a  precious  contribution  to  the  history  of  the 
country.    Even  considered  as  the  produc- 
tions of  a  partisan,  of  a  man  who  must  be 
recognized  as  far  from  disinterested,  there 
is  light  in  them  for  the  historian  who  would 
scrutinize  the  motives  and  manners  of  our 
times.    And  there  is  light  in  them  for  Lori- 
mer's  contemporaries,  there  is  information 
in  them  for  all  citizens  who  have  formed  con- 
ceptions of  men  in  the  public  eye  from  what 
has  been  published  in  the  newspapers,  nearly 
all  of  which  are  deeply  involved  in  the  in- 
trigues of  the  day.    For  example  let  us  con- 
sider the  glimpse  which  the  Record  gives  of 
Medill  McCormick  of  Chicago,  one  of  the 
busiest  of  all  busy  reformers,  a  man  pre- 
sumed by  many  to  be  a  very  respectable  gen- 
tleman.  He  talks  like  a  zealous  civic  patriot, 
and  presumption  is  in  his  favor  because  he 
is  a  disciple  and  backer  of  the  pilot  of  our 
destinies  and  guardian  of  all  our  morals. 
The  Congressional  Record  gives  us  a  brief 
vital  sketch  of  Mr.  JMcCormcik  borrowed 
from  the  Chicago  Inter-Ocean.     By  way  of 
illustrating  the  facility  of  his  enemies  in 
misrepresentation  Lorimer  quoted  a  letter 
written  by  McCormick  in  which  the  latter 
referred  to  the  Inter-Ocean  as  "Lorimer's 
paper."    He  also  quoted  what  the  Inter- 
Ocean  said.     What  it  said  was  that  the 
majority   of  the  stock  of  the  paper  was 
owned  by  George  W.   Hinman  and  that 
Lorimer  "does   not   now  own   and  never 
has  owned  directly  or  indirectly  a  single 
dollars'   worth   of  interest   in   the  Inter- 
Ocean."    "We  apologize  to  our  readers," 
says  the  editor,  "for  dignifying  the  false- 
hood in  question  by  this  editorial  reference, 
but   we   take  it   that   some   recipients  of 
Medill  McCormick's  letter  might  otherwise 
believe  it,  not  realizing  that  it  came  from 
an  alcoholic  little  cad  who  haunts  sanitar- 
iums between  debauches  and  whose  pus-fed 
face  for  months  turned  men  in  disgust  from 
his  lunch  table  and  caused  them  to  avoid 
even  the  tableware  which  touched  his  lips. 
The  name  of  a  degenerate  looks  as  respect- 
able as  that  of  a  gentleman,  and  therefore 
we  are  compelled  in  this  case  to  treat  it, 
not  as  it  is  but  as  it  appears  to  be."    A  most 
brutal  description  of  a  man,  so  brutal  that 
we  should  scruple  at  repeating  it  were  it 
not  for  the  manifest  justification,  that  of 
letting  our  readers  know  something  of  the 
character  of  a  man  who  is  plaving  an  im- 
portant part  on  the  public  stage  in  a  critical 
period  of  his  country's  history.    In  the  his- 
tory of  our  times  nothing  is  more  remark- 


able than  the  power  for  mischief  attained  by 
just  such  men  as  Medill  McCormick.  Have 
we  not  specimens  at  home  whom  we  all 
know  ?  Paranoiacs,  neurotics  and  degener- 
ates of  all  kinds  are  not  only  flocking  to- 
gether but  soaring  to  incredible  heights. 
Roosevelt  himself  is  suspected  by  alienists 
of  being  worse  than  a  megalomaniac,  and  it 
was  only  the  other  day  that  the  New  York 
Sun  discussed  in  an  editorial  the  (|uestion 
whether  his  excessive  indulgence  in  alcohol 
has  impaired  his  capacity  for  leadership. 
The  Sun  mentioned  no  names  and  politely 
professed  disbelief  of  the  stories  in  circula- 
tion, but  devoted  nearly  a  column  to  the 
subject  of  the  effect  of  excessive  indulgence. 
This  we  mention  merely  to  suggest  the  im- 
portance of  an  intimate  knowledge  of  our 
public  men  and  of  the  value  of  the  informa- 
tion that  may  be  found  in  the  Congressional 
Record  of  July  18.  If  you  haven't  it  ask 
your  Congressman  to  send  you  a  copy. 

The  Novel  In  Its  Variety 

A  correspondent  objecting  to  our  observa- 
tions on  the  subject  of  the  novel-with-a- 
purpose  asks  us  if  we  do  not  know  that  it 
is  "the  proper  function  of  the  novel  to 
criticise  life."  Humiliating  as  the  confes- 
sion may  be,  candidly  we  avow  that  we  do 
not  know.  At  the  same  time  we  would  dis- 
abuse our  correspondent's  mind  of  the  no- 
tion that  we  are  intolerant  of  the  purpose- 
ful novel  and  thank  him  for  moistening  an 
arid  interval  of  mental  drought  with  a  juicy 
subject  of  discussion.  The  novel-with-a- 
purpose  is  having  a  new  lease  of  life,  the 
reason  being,  perhaps,  that  this  is  an  age 
of  reform  and  that  every  other  person  you 
meet  believes  the  times  are  out  of  joint  and 
chat  he  knows  how  to  set  them  right.  The 
earth  teems  with  spiritual  and  political 
guides  each  of  whom  knows  what's  wrong 
with  the  world  and  what  the  remedy.  For 
them  the  important  thing  is  to  catch  the 
public  ear.  Some  do  it  by  joining  clubs  and 
reading  papers;  others  by  lifting  their  voices 
on  the  street  corner ;  not  a  few  by  edging 
in  between  book  covers.  It  would  be  unrea- 
sonable to  object  to  any  of  these  methods 
of  obtaining  a  hearing.  But  one  may  ques- 
tion academically  and  without  heat  whether 
it  is  to  the  interest  of  the  novelist  or  of 
mankind  to  employ  the  novel  as  a  medium 
for  getting  a  message  ofif  the  mind.  By  the 
novelist  we  mean  the  story-teller,  the  per- 
son whose  dominant  impulse  is  to  invent 
plots  and  create  character  and  who  is  skilled 
in  the  art  of  narrative.  We  are  inclined  to 
the  opinion  that  the  novelist  for  his  own 
sake  ought  not  to  employ  the  novel  as  a 
tract.  But  we  do  not  say  that  the  novel- 
with-a-purpose  is  objectionable  merely  be- 
cause it  is  what  it  is.  The  only  questions 
to  be  asked  about  a  novel  are,  Does  it  tell 
a  good  story?  Does  it  compel  interest  in 
its  characters?  It  is  the  novelist's  privilege 
to  point  a  moral,  solve  a  problem  or  argue 
a  thesis,  but  first  of  all  he  must  either  spin 
a  yarn  that  enchants  or  create  characters 
that  fascinate.  A  novel  may  be  nothing 
more  than  a  medlev  of  human  reflection, 
of  pathos  and  impertinence  such  as  Tristram 


Shandy;  or  it  may  be  nothing  more  than 
strings  of  episodes  put  together  hap-hazard 
after  the  manner  of  Don  Quixote  or  Gil 
Bias;  or  it  may  be  a  thrilling  tale  of  wild 
adventure  of  the  manner  and  matter  of 
Scott's  romances;  or  an  account  of  the  gen- 
eral state  of  society  and  of  moral,  political 
and  religious  feeling  as  in  Joseph  Andrews 
and  the  Human  Comedy;  or  an  assemblage 
of  characters  revealing  the  anomalies  of  a 
social  system  as  in  Dickens.  The  novelist 
may  be  a  realist  like  Zola  or  an  idealist  like 
George  Sand.  The  fact  is  there  is  no  can- 
onical court  of  fiction.  The  novelist  man- 
ipulates events  at  his  pleasure.  All  that  is 
really  demanded  of  the  novelist  is  amuse- 
ment, diversion.  What  we  ought  to  find 
in  a  novel  is  forgetfulness  of  trouble,  an 
anodyne.  If  we  find  instruction,  so  much 
the  better.  When  the  novelist  with  a  pur- 
pose gives  us  edification  as  well  as  amuse- 
ment he  is  all  the  more  welcome,  but  unless 
he  is  more  of  a  story-teller  than  a  sociologist 
he  is  more  likely  to  bore  than  to  delight. 

The  Difficulties  of  the  Pamphleteer 

It  requires  very  great  artistry  to  make  a 
novel  at  once  didactic  and  diverting.  George 
Meredith  had  the  knack,  but  he  was  an  ex- 
ceptional writer.  He  was  a  brilliant  wit  as 
well  as  a  solemn  philosopher.  A  phycholog- 
ist,  a  student  of  character  and  life,  he  de- 
picted both  in  fascinating  style,  and  what- 
ever he  had  to  say  was  worth  hearing. 
Meredith's  weakness  as  a  story-teller  was  in 
proportion  to  his  strength  as  a  man  of 
scientific  insight,  and  it  was  due  to  the  pre- 
dominance of  his  critical  faculty  that  he 
never  attained  popularity.  While  Dickens 
had  this  critical  faculty  it  was  subordinate 
to  his  imagination,  and  though  he  exercised 
a  tremendous  influence  as  a  reformer  it  was 
because  he  was  chiefly  a  creator  of  types. 
The  purpose  in  Dickens  was  seldom  obtru- 
sive. It  was  incidental.  When  a  novelist 
has  a  consuming  purpose  other  than  that  of 
telling  his  .story  the  purpose  sticks  out  like 
a  sore  thumb.  And  the  novelist  of  this  type 
does  not  deal  honestly  with  his  readers.  He 
warps  the  evidence  to  his  purpose ;  his  char- 
acters are  lay  figures  and  his  episodes  wear 
a  more  or  less  artificial  appearance.  A  novel 
of  this  kind  is  a  failure  both  as  a  story  and 
a  tract.  The  reader  is  never  carried  away 
by  the  story,  nor.  unless  he  is  simple- 
minded,  is  he  convinced  by  the  argument. 
The  truth  is  there  are  very  few  great  noveLs- 
with-a-purpose  as  we  understand  them  to- 
day. Though  Les  Miserables  was  intended  to 
be  such.  Hugo  became  absorbed  in  his  own 
plot  and  produced  a  work  that  appeals  to  a 


TNVIT.\TIONS  MONOGRAMS  CRESTS 

VISJTING  CARD  PLATES  ENGRAVED 


ROBERTSON 


UNION  SQUARE  SAN  FRANCISCO 


August  3,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


5 


variety  of  emotions  and  that  seems  to  have 
many  meanings,  as  most  great  works  of  fic- 
tion do,  notably  Hamlet  and  Don  Quixote. 
It  has  been  said  that  Cervantes  wrote  Don 
Quixote  to  laugh  Spain's  chivalry  away,  but 
there  are  critics  who  say  that  that  was  im- 
possible as  Spain's  chivalry  was  alread}' 
dead  when  Don  Quixote  appeared,  and  who 
find   that   Cervantes   while   pretending  to 


laugh  at  idealism,  is  deriding  the  conceit  of 
the  fat-witted  materialists  whom  he  cozened 
into  laughing  at  the  poor  madman  who  still 
has  faith  in  the  heroic  ideas  of  life  and  duty. 
Whatever  may  be  thought  to  be  the  function 
of  the  novel  the  fact  is  that  the  greatest 
novels,  the  novels  that  have  lived,  were  writ- 
ten chiefly  with  the  purpose  of  amusing. 
In  the  first  rank  of  them  is  Robinson  Crusoe, 


and  keeping  company  with  it  are  the  rom- 
ances of  Scott  and  Dumas  and  those  histor- 
ies of  hearts  and  souls  written  by  Balzac 
and  Thackeray.  We  feel  confident  that 
were  we  able  to  cite  the  judgment  of  the 
great  masters  of  fiction  we  should  find  them 
concurring  to  the  efifect  that  the  province 
of  the  novel  is  not  that  of  criticism. 


Dream-Tryst 


By  Francis  Thompson 


The  breaths  of  kissing  night  and  day 

Were  mingled  in  the  eastern  Heaven: 
Throbbing  with  unheard  melody 

Shook  Lyra  all  its  star-chord  seven; 

When  dusk  shrunk  cold,  and  light  trod  sky, 
And  dawn's  grey  eyes  were  troubled  grey; 
And  souls  went  palely  up  the  sky, 
And  mine  to  Lucide. 


There  was  no  change  in  her  sweet  eyes 
Since  last  I  saw  those  sweet  eyes  shine; 
There  was  no  change  in  her  deep  heart 

Since  last  that  deep  heart  knocked  at  mine. 
Her  eyes  were  clear,  her  eyes  were  Hope's, 

Wherein  did  ever  come  and  go 
The  sparkle  of  the  fountain-drops 
From  her  sweet  soul  below. 


Th(.-  chambers  in  the  house  of  dreams 

Are  fed  with  so  divine  an  air, 
That  Time's  hoar  wings  grow  young  theiein, 
.\nd  they  who  walk  there  are  most  fair. 
I  joyed  for  me,  I  joyed  for  her, 

Who  with  the  Fast  meet  girt  about; 
Where  our  last  kiss  still  warms  the  air, 
Nor  can  her  eyes  go  out. 


Perspective  Impressions 


The  Secretary  of  State  and  the  Board  of  Con- 
trol are  at  loggerheads  over  the  question  which 
has  the  right  to  publish  the  blue  book.  Let  us 
have  an  extra  session  of  the  legislature  to  settle 
the  matter. 


"I  will  run  street  cars  from  the  ocean  beach  to 
the  ferries.  Who  will  stop  us?" — Mayor  Rolph. 
Nobody,  Jim.  But  why  confine  your  activities  to 
the  future? 


"We  regard  our  positions  as  sacred." — Meyer 
Lissner.  Everything  is  sacred  to  the  touch  of 
Mr.  Lissner,  and  himself  is  the  essence  of  sanctity. 


President  Taft  has  gone  to  considerable  trouble 
to  prove  that  his  nomination  was  not  stolen.  Un- 
fortunately it  does  no  good  to  enhance  the 
Colonel's  reputation  as  a  liar  and  a  humbug.  As 
both  he  is  endeared  to  the  hearts  of  the  American 
people. 


The  Rev.  Huffier  who  says,  speaking  of  Helen 
Gould,  that  old  maids  hinder  the  progress  of 
civiliz/'tion  and  that  no  woman  has  done  her  duty 
to  th(  /orld  until  she  has  borne  children,  ought 
to  reflect  on  the  much  greater  damage  that  is 
done  by  women  who  become  mothers  of  hufflers. 


"The  Chief  of  Police  has  ordered  that  women 
be  not  allowed  to  smoke  in  cafes." — News  item. 
This  is  clearly  a  case  of  discrimination  against 
sex  in  a  State  which  has  decreed  that  woman 
shall  have  the  £..me  rights  as  man. 


While  England  has  her  suffragettes  she  should 
not  be  afraid  of  Germany. 

P'rom  Washington  comes  the  word  ,  that  "Gif- 
ford  Pinchot  smells  a  mouse."  Rats!  Or  is  it 
moose,  meese  or  mess? 


A  Philadelphia  woman  aged  104  wants  to  run 
a  foot  race.  Thus  we  see  that  years  and  dis- 
cretion do  not  always  go  hand-in-hand. 


There  is  really  a  very  urgent  demand  for  a  third 
party — among  politicians  out  of  a  job  and  at  outs 
with  their  own  party. 


The  Man  who  Winds  the  Ferry  Clock  hasn't 
registered  yet.  Says  he's  waiting  for  a  pretty 
woman  to  ask  him,  and  admits,  rather  ungal- 
lantly,  that  a  lot  of  the  other  kind  have  already 
entreated  him. 


"It  will  be  a  bold  Federal  or  State  judge  in- 
deed who  will  dare  lend  the  machinery  of  the 
courts  to  assist  the  United  Railroads  and  its  expert 
legal  obstructors  in  blocking  the  Mayor's  de- 
termination to  give  the  Geary  street  line  direct 
connection  with  the  ferries." — The  Examiner. 
And  by  the  time  the  courts  are  reduced  to  an 
absolute  nullity  it  will  be  a  bold  judge  who  will 
even  attempt  to  prevent  the  mob  from  hanging  an 
editor. 


"Heney,"  says  the  Bulletin,  "is  brimming  over 
with  enthusiasm  for  the  new  party."  To  be  sure 
he  is.    The  wild  ass  smelleth  the  fodder  afar  off. 


At  this  crisis  in  the  history  of  the  country  the 
election  of  Wilson  and  Marshall  is  vital  to  the 
country's  welfare. — James  D.  Phelan.  Likewise 
to  Jimmy's  perennial  ambition. 


To  be  a  successful  wife  a  woman  should  be  a 
good  architect  clever  enough  to  alter  her  husband 
according  to  her  own  design  and  adapt  him  to 
her  own  convenience. 


The  papers  rarely  report  the  Sunday  sermons 
in  their  Monday  morning  issues  nowadays.  No 
doubt  this  is  because  so  much  space  is  needed  to 
describe  the  deaths  and  manglings  of  joy-riders. 


In  the  Bull  Moose  convention  there  will  he  no 
contests;  nobody  will  hear  from  iionic;  tlicre  will 
i)e  no  danger  of  a  stampede. 


Noah  Sanford  Arnold,  83  years  young,  obtained 
a  license  Monday  to  marry  Grace  Copeland  aged 
36.  Evidently  virility  still  runs  in  the  Noah 
family. 


"You  can  rest  assured  that  if  no  one  can  be 
found  to  operate  the  first  car  it  will  be  run  to  the 
ferry  if  I  myself  have  to  handle  the  controller." — 
Mayor  Rolph.  Good  boy,  Jim.  Spoken  like  an 
heroic  protege  of  majorities.  And  now  to  give  a 
touch  of  vraiscmblance  to  the  melodrama  you 
ought  to  direct  the  police  to  organize  a  mob 
for  the  occasion  and  to  spill  red  paint  along  the 
track. 


TOWN  TALK 


August  3,  1912 


A  politician  without  a  gift  for  picture>que  ex- 
pression would  be  at  a  sorry  disadvantage.  He'd 
be  Hke  a  prize  fighter  with  a  broken  arm  and 
the  lockjaw.  He  simply  couldn't  fight,  for  in 
politics  fighting  is  largely  talking  about  the  other 
fellow. 

In  California  the  political  art  of  talking  about 
the  other  fellow  has  been  brought  to  a  high  state 
of  cultivation  in  the  Democratic  party  by  Gavin 
McNab.  McXab  talks  in  epigrams,  which  is  the 
way  every  politician  would  talk  if  he  could.  A 
lot  of  McXab's  epigrams  have  been  barbed  for  the 
pricking  of  Theodore  Bell.  Being  a  handy  fighter 
himself  Bell  has  always  retaliated.  Not  with 
epigrams,  however.  He  is  young  yet,  and  hasn't 
mastered  that  form  of  wit.  His  words,  just  the 
same,  have  a  picturesque  quality  that  makes  them 
worth  quoting. 

Bell  is  never  long  out  of  a  fight.  Most  of  his 
political  career  he  has  been  fighting  Gavin  Mc- 
Nab within  the  party  and  the  Republican  machine 
without.  A  few  years  ago  he  took  the  control  of 
the  State  Democratic  organization  away  from 
.McNab,  but  that  didn't  end  their  fight,  of  course; 
it  merely  intensified  their  political  bitterness. 
Fighting  right  along  from  one  battlefield  to  an- 
other Bell  finally  found  himself  at  Baltimore 
lighting,  and  fighting  well,  for  Champ  Clark.  It 
became  necessary  in  the  course  of  that  remarkable 
battle  that  Bell  should  repudiate  his  old  leader 
Bill  Bryan,  the  Peter  Pan  of  Democracy,  and  he 
did  it  with  thoroughness  and  despatch. 

When  that  fight  was  over  and  Woodrow  Wil- 
son had  been  nominated.  Bell  came  home  to  find 
the  ranks  of  his  enemies  swelled  by  a  member  or 
his  old-time  friends.  Tis  the  way  of  politics,  and 
Bell  accepted  the  situation.  S(  ine  men  in  the 
new  alignment  of  the  (ipp<i--ilii  n  said  they 
couldn't  stand  for  a  Clark  man  pretending  to 
run  the  Wilson  campaign  in  California.  Others 
wept  crocodile  tears  over  Bell's  treatment  of  Bili 
Bryan.  .And  from  outside  the  Democratic  party 
appeared  a  Woodrow  Wilson  man  who  as- 
severated that  Bell  was  a  tool  of  the  wicked 
special  interests. 

What  animated  the  Phelans,  the  Caminettis, 
the  Davises,  the  Van  Wycks,  the  Moosers  and 
others  in  their  opposition?    I  asked  Bell  about  it. 

Bell  replied  without  hesitating.  He  laid  it  all 
to  the  machinations  of  that  grand  machinator, 
Gavin  McNab. 

"As  soon  as  Governor  Wilson  was  nominated," 
he  told  me,  "a  few  men  who  had  been  prominent 
in  the  Wilson  primary  fight  got  together  and 
resolved  to  take  over  the  Democracy  of  Cali- 
fornia body,  boots  and  breeches. 

"This  sudden  stir  among  the  Wilson  men 
caught  the  keen  eye  of  the  McNab  organization  in 
San  Francisco  and  they  believed  that  it  aflforded 
them  a  good  opportunity  to  renew  their  own 
efforts  to  obtain  control  of  the  party. 

"So  they  very  shrewdly  encouraged  the  ambi- 
tion of  the  Wilson  men  in  their  project,  with  the 
result  that  we  find  a  coalition  between  forces  that, 
on  the  surface,  have  seemed  irreconcilable.  The 
Wilson  men  who  are  so  desperately  attacking  the 
State  Central  Committee  are  being  very  in- 
geniously used  by  the  McNab  faction." 

"Will  this  project  go  through?" 

"I  think  not.  These  Wilson  men  have  forgot- 
ten how  to  think,  besides  entirely  losing  sight  of 
Governor  Wilson  in  their  mad  attempt  to  oust 
the  Clark  men  from  party  management.    Take  the 


Varied  Types 

LXXXV— THEODORE  BELL 
By  Edward  F.  O'Day 

figure?.  In  the  May  primaries  Clark  received 
43,000  votes.  Wilson  got  17,000.  Personally  I 
received  52,000. 

"So  it's  pretty  hard  to  understand  the  mathe- 
matics of  the  present  miniature  insurrection  or 
just  how  these  insurrectos  can  eliminate  those 
whf)  prevailed  at  the  primaries  three  to  one." 

"What  do  you  intend  to  do?" 

"To  support  the  officers  of  the  State  Central 
Committee.  No  one  can  betray  mc  into  a  loss 
of  temper  either.  We  are  sustained  by  the  vast 
majority  of  the  Democrats  of  California.  Those 
who  are  recklessly  sowing  the  seeds  of  discord 
will  only  discredit  themselves  in  the  eyes  of  all 
good  Democrats  who  are  looking  forward  to 
party  success." 


I'hoto,  V'aughan  and  Fraser 


THEODORE  BELL 

"They  say  your're  a  reactionary.  How  about 
that?" 

"It's  amusing  to  listen  to  that  cry.  Behind  the 
scenes  the  forces  that  have  always  opposed  pro- 
gressive Democracy  in  this  State  are  cunningly 
directing  the  present  skirmish. 

"The  chairman  of  the  State  Central  Committee, 
R.  H.  Dewitt,  has  very  impartially  appointed  the 
committees  to  conduct  the  campaign,  placing  it 
absolutely  in  the  hands  of  zealous  Wilson  men. 
And  I'm  with  Dewitt.  Could  we  do  that  and  be 
reactionaries?" 

"What  got  your  old  friend  'Cam'  into  this  fight 
against  you?" 

"Caminetti  is  the  innocent  victim  of  the  wiles 
of  McNab  who  wants  to  get  back  at  Bell;  of 
Phelan,  our  dilettante  politician,  always  more  or- 
namental than  useful;  and  of  J.  O.  Davis  who 
nurtured  the  ambition  to  be  chairman  of  the  State 
Central  Committee." 

"Where  does  McNab  stand?" 

"McNab  has  never  expressed  a  preference,  but 
all  his  henchmen  with  few  exceptions  are  Wil- 


son men — mainly  for  the  reason  that  our  crowd 
was  for  Clark." 

"Are  they  sincere  in  resenting  your  attack  on 
Bryan  ?" 

"I  shouldn't  call  it  an  attack.  My  opposition 
to  Bryan  was  not  the  substantial  cause  for  the 
attacks  on  me.  It  was  merely  used  to  injure  me 
among  Bryan's  supporters. 

"The  whole  thing  is  this.  Six  or  seven  men  got 
together  in  a  room  and  worked  one  another  up 
by  violent  talk.  When  they  were  surcharged  with 
mixed  emotions  of  ambition,  envy,  hatred  and 
other  bad  feelings,  they  rushed  out,  they  shouted 
from  the  house  tops,  they  went  pell-mell  into 
print  and  gave  their  grievance  to  the  world." 

"To  whom  does  that  refer?" 

"To  such  as  Phelan,  Caminetti,  Davis,  Van 
Wyck  and  Mooser." 

"To  Rudolph  Spreckels  too?" 

"1  don't  know  why  Spreckels  attacked  me. 
Perhaps  I  am  merely  the  victim  of  his  newly  ac- 
quired habit  of  writing  telegrarrs  and  letters.  It 
was  just  one  of  his  vagaries,  the  child  of  his 
peculiar  mentality  that  has  on.y  in  the  last  few 
years  brought  him  to  the  place  where  he  would 
register  and  vote.  His  response  to  my  challenge 
to  produce  facts  in  support  of  his  denunciatory 
telegram  wouldn't  do  credit  to  a  six  year  old  kid. 
His  plea  was  simply  that  I  did  it  because  I 
did  it." 

"Spreckels  is  for  Wilson?" 

"He  has  said  so." 

"Will   he  contribute  to  the   Democratic  cam- 
paign ?" 

"Frank  Drew  is  chairman  of  the  finance  com- 
mittee and  will  be  very  glad,  I  believe,  to  receive 
Ri  dolph's  mite." 

.A  queer  game  politics!  The  only  game  in  the 
world  that  brings  you  more  enemies  the  longer, 
the  more  successfully  you  play  it.  Bell  has  a 
very  respectable  assortment,  and  you  will  notice 
that  he  keeps  them  in  a  good  condition  of  irrecon- 
cilability by  prodding  them.  I  actually  think  that  | 
Bell  would  droop  and  wither  if  McXab  insisted  on 
becoming  his  friend.  Not  that  there's  3ny_j, 
danger! 


Photographs 

Whigham's  Art  Studios 

739  Market  Street,  Opp.  Grant  Avenue 
1615  Fillmore  Street.  Near  Geary 
Phones:         Waat  7831         Home  J  1223        S  3757 
San  Francisco 


Going  Abroad? 

To  the  Orient? 

To  the  Mediterranean? 

To  the  West  Indies? 

To  South  America? 

To  Egypt  and  the  Nile? 

To  London,  Paris,  Berlin  and  Italy? 

Around  the  World? 

Or  •  flight  in  •  Zeppelia  Ainhip? 

Gel  proffrulu  of  our  Funout  Pleuure  CniMes 
Hftn<l*oai«Iy  illuiUled  pamphlets  grabi. 

HAMBURG- AMERICAN  LINE 

160  POWELL  ST.  SAN  FRANQSCX) 


August  3,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


7 


Correspondence 


"A  Lawyer"  Corrected 

San  Francisco,  7-29,  1912. 
Editor  Town  Talk:  In  your  issue  of  July  27,  1912, 
"A  Lawyer"  writes:  "Judge  Lawlor  instructed  the 
jury  as  did  Judge  Dunne  in  the  Coffey  case  that 
Gallagher,  particeps  criminis  with  Ruef,  was  not 
an  accomplice."  Permit  me  to  point  out  that 
Judge  Lawlor  did  nothing  of  the  kind.  On  the 
contrary,  he  said  to  the  jury:  "You  are  hereby  in- 
structed that  James  L.  Gallagher  and  Andrew  M. 
Wilson,  under  their  own  testimony,  in  the  event 
that  there  was  any  offer  to  bribe  John  J.  Furey  as 
charged,  are  each  and  both  of  them  accomplices." 
(Transcript,  Ruef  case,  fol.  1146.) 

Yours  truly, 

— Amicus  Curiae. 


A  Plea  For  Tight  Skirts 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Sir:  Why  all  this  rumpus 
about  tight  skirts?  In  the  days  of  hoops  Graces, 
Bacchantes  and  nymphs  were  in  demand  that 
men  might  get  some  idea  of  the  true  outlines 
of  woman.  These  prudes  who  object  to  tight 
skirts  that  reveal  graceful  lines  and  short  skirts 
that  permit  women  to  expose  a  dainty  leg  make 
me  tired.  I  commend  to  them  one  of  Waller's 
loveliest  songs  containing  these  lines: 

Small  is  the  worth 

Of  beauty  from  the  light  retired; 

Bid  her  come  forth, 

Suffer  herself  to  be  desired 

And  not  blush  so  to  be  admired. 

Why  should  there  be  objection  to  such  disclos- 
ures as  are  made  by  the  tight  skirt? 

"  'Tis  a  good  sight  how  every  limb  doth  stir 
For  ever  in  a  womanly  sweet  way" 

Says  an  Italian  poet  of  other  days.  Why  don't 
these  protesting  prudes  have  something  to  say 
about  men's  trousers?  I  think  that  for  the  sake 
of  decency  all  men,  and  some  more  than  others, 
should  be  compelled  to  wear  kilts.    And  I  am 

— A  Spinster. 


As  to  "The  Toad" 

Editor  Town  Talk,  Dear  Sir:  It  seems  too  bad 
that  a  writer  for  a  paper  as  high-class  as  yours 
should  allow  his  judgment  to  be  swayed  by  per- 


sonal predilections  in  penning  an  estimate  of  a 
stage  performance.  That  just  such  a  thing  hap- 
pened when  one  of  your  writers  sat  down  to  write 
about  the  performance  of  "The  Toad"  there  can 
be  no  doubt.  "The  Toad"  is  a  great  play  and 
any  writer  who  says  it  is  not  convicts  himself 
of  incompetence  or  worse.  Let  us  say  that  in 
the  present  instance  the  writer  knocked  "The 
Toad"  because  he  was  unfriendly  toward  the 
Ncwberrys.  That  is  probably  correct.  No  per- 
s  111  would  write  as  he  did  of  "The  Toad"  unless 
he  had  a  grudge  against  the  author.  Again  I  say, 
too  bad!  If  you  will  pardon  my  getting  personal, 
your  writer  reminds  me  of  the  centipede.  You 
know, 

A  centipede  was  happy  till 
One  day  a  toad  in  fun 
Said,  "Pray  which  leg 

Moves  after  which?" 
This  raised  her  doubts 

To  such  a  pitch 
She  fell  exhausted 

In  the  ditch, 
Not  knowing  how  to  run. 

"The  Toad"  presented  a  problem  which  your 
writer  was  incapable  of  solving,  and  like  the 
centipede  he  fell  down. 

Sincerely, 

— A  Carmel  Writer. 
P.  S. — I  am  told   Professor  William  Dallam 
.Amies  says  "The  Toad"  is  rotten.    But  I  refuse 
to  believe  that  he  used  such  language. 


A  Reply  to  Mrs.  Atherton 

Editor  Town  Talk.  Sir:  I  see  that  Gertrude 
.\therton  has  been  writing  to  the  papers,  com- 
plaining of  the  indift'erence  of  San  Francisco 
women  to  the  inestimable  boon  that  was  won 
for  them  at  the  polls.  Mrs.  Atherton  being  very 
strong  for  equal  suffrage  concludes  that  all 
women  who  are  not  of  the  same  mind  are  ex- 
tremely ignorant.  Mrs.  Atherton  is  nothing  if 
not  dogmatic,  which  is  too  bad.  To  be  dog- 
matical is  to  be  unphilosophical.  It-  is  the  dog- 
matical spirit  that  inclines  a  woman  to  be  cen- 
sorious of  her  neighbors.  It  is  a  characteristic 
of  persons  who  think  with  tiieir  heart  rather  than 
tlieir  head.  This  appears  to  be  what  Mrs.  Ather- 
ton does.  She  is  unreasonable.  She  argues  that 
it  is  important  for  the  women  of  San  Francisco 


to  vote,  and  yet  she  says  that  they  have  the 
mental  inertness  of  oysters.  If  the  women  of  San 
Francisco  are  on  a  level  with  shell  fish  then  Mrs. 
Atherton  should  pray  to  God  to  keep  them  home. 
Because  thousands  of  women  are  for  equal 
suffrage  in  foreign  parts,  therefore,  argues  Mrs. 
Atherton,  equal  suffrage  is  a  thing  that  all  women 
should  crave.  This  is  not  good  logic,  and  I'm 
surprised  to  see  Mrs.  Atherton  indulge  in  it. 
Mrs.  Atherton  is  a  trifle  superficial  as  a  philos- 
opher. Her  certitudes  are  impressionistic.  She 
grasps  world  problems  with  too  much  ease.  I 
recognize  her  as  one  of  the  finest  specimens  of 
our  sex,  but  when  I  see  how  easy  she  gets  her 
facts  and  avoids  second  thoughts  I  wonder  if  after 
all  it  isn't  true  that  women  bring  nothing  to 
politics  but  mere  emotionalism.  Mrs.  Atherton 
is  certainly  above  the  average  of  us  in  intelligence, 
yet  the  refraction  of  the  personal  equation  she 
mistakes  for  the  clear,  white  light  of  truth.  I 
see  that  like  many  of  our  politicians  who  pass  as 
statesmen  she  thoroughly  apprehends  the  Tend- 
ency of  the  Times.  I  suppose  she  does  this 
intuitively.  For  in  no  other  way  is  the  Tendency 
of  the  Times  ever  apprehended.  The  Tendency  of 
the  Times  is  as  illusive  as  a  mirage.  I  see  also 
that  Mrs.  Atherton  advises  women  to  read  Ed- 
mund Kelly's  "Twentieth  Century  Socialism"  and 
Albert  Weyl's  "New  Democracy"  in  order  to  get 
in  touch  with  "progressive  democracy  which  is 
bound  to  come."  I  hope  that  Mrs.  Atherton 
doesn't  believe  that  because  a  thing  is  bound  to 
come  it  is  right.  I  also  hope  that  she  doesn't 
believe  that  everything  that  is  "bound  to  come" 
invariably  comes.  Universal  experience  teaches 
that  the  things  bound  to  come  get  sidetracked  for 
the  unexpected  which  arrives  by  slow  freight. 
Now,  Mr.  Editor,  I  have  so  much  respect  for  Mrs. 
Atherton's  influence,  I  would  recommend  a  little 
reading  for  her.  First  I  would  recommend  M. 
Faguet's  "Cult  of  Incompetency,"  because  that  is 
an  up-to-date  book,  and  I  know  that  Mrs.  Ather- 
ton has  cultivated  the  bad  habit  of  living  ex- 
clusively in  the  present.  Next  I  would  advise  her 
to  read  the  Federalist  papers.  I  ought  to  assume, 
of  course,  since  she  is  a  warm  admirer  of  Alex- 
ander Hamilton  that  she  has  read  those  papers, 
but  I  feel  certain  she  has  not.  I  will  also  recom- 
mend to  Mrs.  Atherton  J.  S.  Mill  in  his  disserta- 
tions on  genuine  democracy,  Amicl's  Diary  for 
what  there  is  in  it  on  Democracy. 

Sincerely, 

— Louise  Marquardt. 


Siftings  from  Many  Sources 

Being  a  Brief  Chronicle  of  Significant  Events  the  Wide  World  Over 


Typewriters  in  China 

With  the  changes  produced  by  the  Chinese: 
revolution  has  come  an  increased  demand  fo' 
typewriters.  Conservative  Chinese  merchants  are 
beginning  to  abandon  their  ancient  methods,  and 
are  taking  readily  to  the  typewriter  as  a  means 
of  carrying  on  their  correspondence.  It  is  esti- 
mated that  there  are  five  hundred  typewriters  in 
use  in  Chinese  firms  of  Hong  Kong.  Nearly  ail 
are  of  American  make.  Many  young  Chinese  are 
studying  typewriting  and  stenography  in  the 
Chinese  business  colleges.  It  is  probable  that 
imports  of  typewriters  into  China  now  reach 
$100,000  annually  with  good  prospects  of  notable 
increase  within  the  next  few  years. 


By  Robert  McTavish 

U.  S.  Bars  Absinthe 

After  October  1  absinthe  frappe  will  be  a  thing 
of  the  past  as  far  as  hotels  and  saloons  in  this 
country  are  concerned.  After  that  date  absinthe, 
which  is  being  sold  in  increasing  quantities  in  the 
United  States,  will  be  barred  from  importation 
.ind  also  from  being  transported  from  State  to 
State.  The  Pure  Food  Board  has  decided  that 
absinthe  as  a  beverage  is  dangerous  to  health  and 
has  put  the  ban  on  it.  The  decision  of  the  board 
s.iys:  Importations  of  absinthe  are  prohibited, 
both  because  they  come  froin  countries  which 
i'(  rbid  or  restrict  its  manufacture  and  sale  and 
bi'cafse  these  products  are  injurious  to  the  health 
of  the  people  of  the  United  States. 


Kruttschnitt  Solves  a  Problem 

Julius  Kruttschnitt,  director  of  the  Harriman 
lines,  thinks  he  has  solved  the  problem  of  broken 
rails.  His  engineers  have  found  that  the  base  of 
a  regular  90-pound  rail  tends  to  become  bowl- 
shaped  in  cold  weather,  and  the  pounding  of  the 
wheels  causes  surface  fractures.  By  broadening 
the  base  of  the  rail  and  making  it  heavier  the 
breaks  are  reduced  to  a  minimum.  Mr.  Krutt- 
schnitt is  reported  as  saying:  "We  find  that  the 
rail  with  the  heavier  base  gave  only  two  break- 
ages to  the  100  miles  in  the  winter  months,  (as 
compared  with  23  breakages  in  the  regular  rail), 
the  same  rate  as  during  the  summer  months,  so  that 
so  far  as  we  are  concerned,  the  problem  is  solved." 


£  TOWNTALK  August  3,  1912 


Mad  ame  Hermet 

By  Guy  de  Maupassant 

(The  following  short  story  by  the  renowned  French  writer,  Guy  de  Maupassant,  was  discovered  quite  recently 
among  some  papers  left  by  the  master  at  his  death.  It  has  been  included  in  a  new  edition  of  his  stories  which  has 
just  appeared  in  Paris.    It  is  here  reprinted  from  the  New  York  Times.) 


The  insane  always  attract  me.  These  unfor- 
tunate people  live  in  a  mysterious  land  of  wonder- 
ful dreams;  in  an  unpierceable  cloud  of  sadness, 
where  everything  that  they  have  seen  and  loved 
on  earth  is  revived  to  a  new  life  by  an  imagina- 
tive existence,  outside  of  all  the  laws  by  which 
tilings  and  men's  thoughts  are  ruled. 

Once  when  I  visited  one  of  their  asylums,  the 
physician  who  showed  me  around  said:  "Wait,  I 
will  show  you  an  interesting  case." 

He  had  a  cell  opened  which  was  occupied  by 
a  woman  of  about  forty  years  of  age.  She  was 
still  beautiful,  and  sat  in  a  large  easy  chair  re- 
garding her  face  carefully  in  a  small  hand  mirror. 

The  moment  she  noticed  us  she  rose  quickly, 
ran  to  the  back  part  of  the  room,  fetched  a  veil 
which  had  been  spread  across  a  chair,  covered 
her  face  carefully  with  it,  and  returned,  nodding 
her  head  in  answer  to  our  greeting. 

"Well,  how  do  you  feel  this  morning?"  asked 
the  physician. 

She  uttered  a  deep  sigh:  "Oh.  very  badly,  the 
marks  are  increasing  every  day." 

He  answered  her  with  a  convincing  counten- 
ance: "Not  at  all,  not  at  all;  I  assure  you  you  are 
deceiving  yourself." 

She  came  up  to  us  and  whispered  to  him:  "No, 
I  am  sure  of  it.  I  have  counted  this  morning  ten 
more  marks:  three  on  the  right  cheek,  four  on  the 
left  cheek,  and  three  on  the  forehead.  It  is  dis- 
gusting— disgusting.  Very  soon  I  shall  not  be 
able  to  show  myself  to  any  one,  not  even  to  my 
son;  no,  not  even  to  him.  I  am  lost,  I  am  dis- 
figured forever." 

She  fell  back  in  her  chair  ant}  began  to  sob. 

The  physician  took  a  chair,  sat  down  next  to 
her,  and  said  in  a  gentle,  consoling  voice:  "Well, 
well,  let  me  see.  I  assure  you  it  is  nothing. 
With  a  little  operation  I  shall  be  able  to  remove 
it  all." 

She  answered  with  a  shake  of  her  head  in  the 
negative,  without  a  word.  He  wanted  to  touch 
her  veil,  but  she  took  hold  of  him  with  both 
hands  so  violently  that  her  finger  nails  pierced 
his  flesh. 

He  began  again  to  quiet  her  and  to  persuade 
her.  "You  know  quite  well  that  I  always  remove 
thcin  every  time,  these  ugly  marks,  and  that  one 
cannot  see  them  any  more  at  all  after  I  have 
treated  you.  But  if  you  do  not  show  them  to  me 
then  I  cannot  cure  you." 

to  you.  But  I  do  not  know  this  gentlemen  here 
to  you.  But  I  do  not  know  this  gentleman  there 
who  accompanies  you." 

"He  also  is  a  physician  who  will  be  able  to 
treat  you  better  than  I." 

Now  she  hesitatingly  permitted  her  face  to  be 
uncovered.  But  her  fear,  her  excitement  and 
timidity  at  being  seen  made  her  blush  to  her  neck. 
She  lowered  her  eyes,  turning  her  face  now  to 
the  right,  now  to  the  left,  as  if  to  avoid  our 
glances,  and  stammered: 

"Oh,  I  am  suffering  terribly  when  I  allow  my- 
self to  be  seen  like  this;  it  is  dreadful,  is  it  not? 
Yes,  isn't  it  dreadful?" 

I  regarded  her  with  astonishment,  for  she  had 
nothing  on  her  face,  no  mark,  no  spot,  no  sign 
of  anything  unsightly,  no  scar. 

She  turned  around  to  me,  still  keeping  her  eyes 
lowered,  and  said: 

"I  was  taken  with  this  terrible  sickness  while 
I  was  nursing  my  son.  I  saved  him,  but  I  have 
been  disfigured.  I  have  given  my  poor  child  my 
beauty.    After  all,  I  have  done  my  duty,  and  my 


conscience  is  at  rest.  If  I  suffer  then  only  God 
can  know  it." 

The  physician  had  taken  a  small  water  color 
brush  out  of  his  pocket. 

"Just  let  me  attend  to  this,"  said  he,  "I  will 
make  everything  right  for  you." 

She  showed  him  her  right  check,  and  he  com- 
menced to  touch  it  lightly  as  if  he  were  putting 
dabs  of  paint  on  it.  He  did  the  same  on  the  left 
ciieek,  then  on  the  chin,  and  finally  on  the  fore- 
head. 

"Now  look  at  yourself,"  he  cried,  "there  is 
nothing  more  there,  nothing  more!" 

She  took  the  mirror  and  gazed  at  herself  with 
a  strange  tense  excitement,  and  with  a  fierce 
effort  of  her  mind  tried  to  discover  something. 
Then  she  sighed  and  said:  "No,  there  is  not  much 
to  be  seen  now.    I  thank  you  sincerely!" 

The  physician  had  risen.  He  greeted  her,  told 
me  to  go,  and  followed  me.  As  soon  as  he  had 
closed  the  door  he  said: 

"Now,  here  you  have  the  cruel  story  of  this 
unfortunate  woman.  Her  name  is  Mme.  Hermet. 
She  was  very  beautiful,  very  vain,  very  much 
loved,  and  she  loved  life.  She  was  one  of  those 
women  whose  only  desire  in  the  world  was  to 
preserve  her  beauty  and  to  please.  Her  constant 
anxiety  was  for  the  freshness  and  care  of  her 
face,  her  hands,  her  teeth,  and  all  those  parts 
of  her  body  which  a  woman  can  show.  They  oc- 
cupied all  the  hours  of  her  day  and  demanded  her 
complete  attention. 

"She  was  left  a  widow  with  an  only  son.  The 
child  was  brought  up  like  all  children  of  admired 
women  of  the  great  world.    Still,  she  loved  him. 

"He  grew  up  and  she  became  older.  Did  she 
see  this  fatal  moment  arriving?  I  do  not  know. 
Did  she,  as  so  many  others,  look  at  her  skin 
every  morning  for  hours  and  hours — this  skin 
which  was  formerly  so  fine,  so  transparent,  so 
clear,  which  now  was  drawing  into  little  wrinkles 
under  her  eyes  and  which  showed  thousands  of 
tiny,  scarcely  noticeable,  signs  that  day  by  day, 
month  by  month,  it  was  slowly  withering? 

"Did  she  cry,  heart-broken,  lying  on  her  knees, 
her  forehead  on  the  ground,  praying — praying — 
praying  to  Him  who  kills  beings  like  this,  in  this 
manner;  Who,  in  their  youth,  gives  them  that 
which  will  make  their  old  age  harder;  Who  lends 
them  beauty  in  order  to  take  it  back  again? 

"Without  doubt  she  suffered  all  these  tortures. 
For  the  following  thing  happened: 

"One  day — she  was  then  about  thirty-five  years 
old — her  fifteen-year-old  son  was  taken  ill.  He 
had  to  stay  in  bed,  although  no  one  could  tell 
what  was  the  cause  of  his  malady,  or  what  was  its 
nature. 

"A  priest,  who  was  his  tutor,  nursed  him,  and 
never  went  from  his  side,  whereas  Madame  Her- 
met simply  asked  for  news  as  to  the  condition 
of  the  invalid  morning  and  night. 

"In  the  morning  she  would  enter  his  room, 
wrapped  in  a  dressing  gown,  smiling,  perfumes 
emanating  from  her,  and  ask,  the  moment  she 
stepped  through  the  door:  'Well,  George,  are  we 
better  today?' 

"The  tall  lad,  his  face  red  and  swollen,  and 
burning  with  fever,  would  replj':  'Yes,  mamma, 
dear,  a  little  better." 

"She  remained  a  few  moments  in  the  room, 
looked  at  the  medicine  bottles,  and  uttered  a 
little  'pooh'  with  her  painted  lips.  Then  crying 
suddenly:  'Oh,  I  forgot  something  very  import- 


ant,' she  ran  out  of  the  room,  leaving  in  her 
train  all  the  delicate  perfumes  of  her  toilet. 

"In  the  evening  she  appeared  in  a  decollete 
dress  and  was  still  in  a  greater  hurry,  for  she 
was  always  too  late.  She  had  just  time  to  ask: 
"Well,  what  has  the  doctor  said?' 

"The  priest  would  answer:  'He  has  not  said 
anything  definite  yet,  Madame.' 

"But  one  evening  he  replied:  'Madame,  your  son 
has  been  attacked  by  smallpox.' 

"She  uttered  a  terrible  cry  and  ran  from  the 
room. 

"When  her  maid  entered  her  room  next  morn- 
ing there  was  a  strong  smell  of  burnt  sugar,  and 
she  found  her  mistress  sitting  up  in  bed,  her  eyes 
staring  wide,  trembling  with  fear,  her  face  pale 
with  sleeplessness. 

"As  soon  as  her  shutters  were  opened  Mme. 
Hermet  asked:  'How  is  George?' 

■■  'Un,  not  at  all  well  today,  Madame.' 

"She  only  rose  toward  noon,  took  two  eggs  and 
a  cup  of  tea,  as  if  she  were  ill  herself.  Then  she 
went  out  and  inquired  at  the  apothecary  about 
preventatives  against  contagion  of  smallpox.  She 
did  not  return  home  till  supper  time,  laden  down 
with  all  sorts  of  bottles;  then  she  locked  herself 
in  her  room,  where  she  saturated  herself  with 
antidotes. 

"The  priest  awaited  her  in  the  dining  room. 
As  soon  as  she  noticed  him  she  called  out  with 
a  voice  trembling  with  excitement: 

"  'Well?' 

"  'Oh,  not  better.    The  doctor  is  very  anxious.' 

"She  began  to  cry  and  could  not  eat  anything. 
She  felt  so  afraid  and  depressed. 

"The  following  morning,  at  dawn,  she  asked 
for  the  news,  which  was  no  better.  She  spent  the 
whole  day  in  her  room,  where  small  braziers  were 
smoking,  sending  up  strong  perfumes.  Her  maid 
declares  that  she  heard  her  sighing  and  sobbing 
the  whole  of  the  evening. 

"A  whole  week  passed  by  like  this  without  her 
doing  anything  else  but  going  out  every  after- 
noon for  one  or  two  hours  to  get  a  breath  of  air. 

"Now  she  inquired  every  hour  as  to  the  condi- 
tion of  the  invalid,  and  sobbed  when  she  received 
worse  news. 

"On  the  eleventh  day,  in  the  morning,  the  priest 
announced  himself,  stepped  into  her  room,  and 
said,  without  taking  the  chair  which  she  offered: 

'"Madame,  your  son  is  very  ill  indeed,  and  he 
wishes  to  see  you.' 

"She  fell  on  her  knees  and  cried: 

"  'Oh,  my  God — oh,  my  God — I  shall  never  be 
able  to  dare  it;  my  God,  my  God,  help  me.' 

"The  priest   continued:   'The  physician  gives 

(Continued  on  Page  21.) 


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I 


August  3,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


Poems  About  San  Francisco 

(Dr.  Edward  Robeson  Taylor  has  written  a  great  many  sonnets,  some  better  than  others.  In  the  sonnet  below 
he  is  represented,  if  not  at  his  best,  at  least  at  his  average  poetical  accomplishment.  But  the  worthy  doctor  never 
soars  very  high,  even  when  his  winged  steed  of  poesy  voIi)lanes  him  around  Twin  Peaks.) 

LI— TO  THE  TWIN  PEAKS 
By  Edward  Robeson  Taylor 


I  see  you  rise  beyond  the  surging  street, 

O  peaks  beloved,  so  uniquely  fair 

That  nature's  boldest  courage  would  despair 

To  mould  and  garnish  others  more  complete, 

Whether  the  gray-hued  mists  of  ocean  bear 

Their  streamers  o'er  you,  or  the  sun's  kiss  greet 

Your  lovely  bloom  and  blade,  or  moonbeams  meet 

To  weave  new  beauties  in  your  freshening  air. 

Full  oft  my  vision  pictures  you  to  be 

The  breasts  of  some  huge  goddess  whose  great  head 

In  glorious  grandeur  fancy  feigns  to  see; 

And  then  her  lips,  love-trembling,  seem  t'  unfold 

Still  rarer  marvels  than  the  Days  of  Gold 

For  that  dear  city  wide  beneath  you  spread. 


Carmel  Disintegrates 

Carmel  is  no  longer  the  abiding  place  of  the 
Muses.  They  have  fled  the  once  peaceful  hamlet 
by  the  sundown  sea  where  but  a  little  while  ago 
they  were  wooed  by  weavers  of  verse,  builders  of 
plays,  makers  of  fiction,  phrase-mongers  and  all 
kinds  of  artists  in  words.  Carmel,  the  seat  of 
culture,  where  literary  genius  was  encouraged  to 
bud  and  blossom,  where  the  air  was  sweet  with 
the  fragrance  of  song  and  soft  ocean  zephyrs 
made  every  tree  a  statue  of  Memnon  with  in- 
finity of  notes,  where  even  the  butcher  was  an 
esthete  and  the  grocer  in  the  twilight  could  see 
visions  and  dream  dreams;  beautiful  Carmel,  so 
inspiring  to  the  imagination,  so  soothing  to  the 
nerves,  where  is  the  glory  that  was  so  briefly 
thine?  Alas,  Carmel  has  been  forsworn.  Its 
stretch  of  shore  no  longer  echoes  to  the  language 
of  the  imagination  and  the  passions.  In  the  lute 
of  its  literary  colony  there  is  a  rift.  The  rom- 
ance of  modern  Carmel  is  now  but  a  memory. 
First  to  go  was  John  Fleming  Wilson,  short  story 
writer,  well  known  to  readers  of  the  Saturday 
Evening  Post.  He  will  not  return.  To  go  also 
is  George  Sterling,  poet,  whose  pen  though  hardly 
yet  come  to  maturity,  to  many  forms  of  things 
unknown  has  given  shape  and  to  airy  nothing  a 
local  habitation  and  a  name.  Plato  banished  the 
poets  from  his  commonwealth.  Sterling  has 
banished  himself  from  Carmel.  Never  again  for 
George.  He  goes  to  Glen  Ellen  there  to  join  his 
friend  Jack  London.  Who  knows  but  that  Glen 
Ellen  is  to  become  the  literary  centre  of  the  near 
future. 


When  Literary  Folk  Disagree 

Naturally  persons  who  take  an  interest  in  the 
Carmel  school  of  literature  will  be  curious  to 
know  the  reason  of  the  exodus  of  the  Muses. 
But  it  is  not  for  me  to  gratify  this  curiosity. 
Suffice  it  that  literary  men  and  women  are  just 


J.  C.  WILSON  &  CO. 

M/New  York  Stock  Exchange 
._L„,  )  New  York  Cotton  Exchange 
I  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
vThe  Stock  and  Bond  Exchange,  S.  F. 

Main   Office— MILLS   BUILDING,   San  Francisco 

Branch  Offices — ^Los  Angeles,  San  Diego,  Coronado 
Beach,  Portland,  Ore.,  Seattle,  Wash,  Vancouver,  B.  C. 


The  Spectator 

like  other  folk  in  the  matter  of  whims  and  pas- 
sions. Congenial  as  they  may  be  in  their  tastes 
it  is  as  difficult  for  them  to  dwell  together  in 
peace  and  harmony  as  for  persons  without  imag- 
ination; perhaps  more  so.  There  have  been 
several  little  misunderstandings  at  Carmel,  some 
of  a  romantic  nature  and  some  as  simple  as  a 
rustic  ditty.  But  there  has  been  very  little"  of 
vulgar  quarreling.  When  John  Fleming  Wilson 
said  adieu  to  Carmel  it  was  because  of  a  hostility 
that  he  provoked  by  presuming  to  constitute  him- 
self a  sort  of  Mr.  Grundy.  When  George  Sterling 
decided  to  go  to  Glen  Ellen  it  was  because  he 
preferred  to  be  near  his  friend  London  and  far 
away  from  some  of  the  remnants  of  the  colony. 
The  loss  of  Sterling  is  a  severe  blow.  He  was 
the  star  resident,  and  he  is  by  far  the  most 
popular  of  all  our  literary  men.  Among  the 
literati  left  in  Carmel  are  Harry  Leon  Wilson 
who  recently  married  Helen  Cooke  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Perry  Newberry,  joint  producers  of  "The 
Toad." 


Auburn's  Precocious  Genius 

Speaking  of  Sterling  I  am  reminded  that  his 
protege  Clark  Ashton  Smith  is  soon  to  make  his 
appearance  between  book  covers.  The  man- 
uscript is  now  in  the  hands  of  Alex.  Robertson, 
tlic  publisher  who  is  ever  ready  to  introduce  Cali- 
fornia poets  to  the  public.  Great  things  are  ex- 
pected of  Smith.  Indeed  he  is  said  to  be  the 
greatest  poet  this  country  has  ever  seen.  Yet  he 
is  only  19  years  old.  Were  it  not  for  literary 
prodigies  of  the  past  we  would  regard  as  not 
only  extravagant  but  ridiculous  the  things  that 
we  hear  of  Clark  Ashton  Smith.  Here  is  a 
3  "Uth  hardly  more  than  half  educated  who  is  said 
to  be  writing  poetry  as  remarkable  for  its 
beauties  as  some  of  the  finest  of  the  early  per- 
formances of  John  Keats,  and  of  whom  it  is  pre- 
dicted that  he  will  take  rank  with  poets  of  the 
first  order.  Now  the  men  who  arc  saying  these 
things  are  not  estimating  the  magnitude  of  the 
young  poet's  genius  by  its  prematureness.  They 
are  men  of  judgment,  competent  critics.  One  of 
them  is  George  Sterling,  a  poet  to  whom  many 
critics  have  ascribed  the  loftiest  excellences. 
Sterling  has  none  but  a  poet's  interest  in  Smith. 
Sterling  never  heard  of  Smith  until  the  latter  sent 
iiim  some  of  his  verses.  Immediately  he  became 
interested.  He  found  that  the  young  poet  was 
living  with  his  parents  on  a  small  farm  near 


Auburn.  He  cultivated  the  youth's  acquaintance, 
praised  his  work  and  gave  him  all  possible  en- 
couragement. Now  he  says,  "I  wish  I  could  write 
the  poetry  that  he  writes."  Ambrose  Bierce,  who 
discovered  Sterling  and  Scheffauer,  has  met  the 
Auburn  poet,  and  he,  too,  affirms  that  the  young 
fellow  is  an  extraordinary  genius. 


The  Abyss  Triumphant 

I  have  received  from  the  Auburn  poet  a  speci- 
men of  his  handiwork  which  shows  that  he  has 
an  imagination  that  in  its  maturity  may  put  "a 
girdle  round  the  universe."  Evidently  the  young- 
ster is  occupied  with  thoughts  of  big  things.  Evi- 
dently, too,  he  has  the  power  over  words  to  make 
them  come  winged  at  his  bidding  and  to 
make  pictures  vivid  as  of  an  actual  impression 
of  objects.  The  poem  is  entitled  "The  Abyss 
Triumphant": 

The  force  of  suns  had  waned  beyond  recall; 
Chaos  was  re-established  over  all, 

Where  lifeless  atoms  through  forgetful  deeps 
Fled  imrelated,  cold,  immusical. 

Above  the  tumult  Heaven  alone  endured; 
Long  since  the  bursting  walls  of  Hell  had  poured 
Demon  and  damned  to  peace  erstwhile  denied, — 
In  that  Abyss  God's  might  had  not  immured. 

(He  could  but  thwart  it  with  creative  mace  .  .  .) 
And  now  it  rose  about  the  heavenly  base. 

Eating  at  pillars  rotten  through  and  through, 
Of  Matter's  last,  most  firm  abiding-place. 

Bastion  and  minaret  began  to  nod. 
Till  all  the  pile,  unmindful  of  His  rod, 

Dissolved  in  thunder,  and  the  void  Abyss 
Caught  like  a  quicksand  at  the  feet  of  God! 


WE  HAVE  MOVED  OUR  OFFICES  TO 

410  MONTGOMERY  ST. 

Our  Facilities  for  Handling 
INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 

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10 


TOWN  TALK 


August  3,  1912 


New  Light  on  President  Taft 

In  ihcse  days  of  pettifogging  vindictiveness  and 
lilliputian  spites  it  is  refreshing  to  find  evidence 
of  broad  statesmanship  and  liberal-mindedness 
in  high  places.  And  an  instance  of  this  has  just 
come  to  my  notice.  If  I  ever  had  a  doubt  that 
President  Taft  was  a  great  as  well  as  a  good  man 
—and  thank  Heaven!  I  never  did— it  would  be  re- 
moved by  what  I  have  learned  of  a  letter  he 
wrote  to  Charles  C.  Moore,  the  president  of  the 
World's  Fair.  It  does  not  heighten  my  opinion 
of  the  President — it  merely  confirms  and  throws 
new  light  on  it.  The  letter  explained  to  Presi- 
dent Moore  just  how  President  Taft  felt  about 
his  crushing  defeat  in  the  California  primaries. 
It  was  a  personal  letter,  and  on  that  account 
President  Moore  has  not  seen  his  way  clear  to 
making  it  public.  But  because  the  views  of  the 
President  were  of  as  much  interest  to  the  other 
members  of  the  Panama-Pacific  directorate  as 
they  were  to  him,  Moore  read  the  letter  at  a 
board  meeting.  Otherwise  it  has  been  kept  from 
the  public;  how  closely  may  be  judged  from  the 
fact  that  a  resume  of  its  contents  is  only  now 
leaking  out,  though  it  was  written  shortly  after 
the  primary  election. 


The  President's  Attitude 

When  the  Roosevelt  forces  carried  the  primary 
election,  many  hastily  formed  the  opinion  that 
President  Taft  would  resent  the  manner  in  which 
he  was  treated  by  the  Republicans  of  the  State 
which  he  had  so  signally  favored.  Some  even 
thought  that  his  interest  in  the  Fair  would  wane, 
and  that  he  would  take  no  interest  in  the 
many  important  measures  necessary  for  its  com- 
plete success.  But  these  did  not  know  President 
Taft.  The  letter  he  wrote  to  Moore  showed  the 
nobility  of  his  character.  The  President  wrote 
that  he  had  never  yet  considered  that  he  had  the 
right  to  resent  the  actions  of  a  majority  of  the 
voters  of  his  party,  no  matter  how  hostile  that 
action  might  be  to  himself,  and  that  the  result  of 
the  primary  in  California  w-ould  work  no  change 
in  his  habits  of  thought  in  this  regard.  He  said 
that  no  political  consideration  influenced  him  in 
favoring  San  Francisco  as  the  place  for  the 
World's  Fair.  He  said  he  had  been  for  San 
Francisco  because  he  thought  it  the  ideal  place  to 
hold  the  Fair,  it  being  the  principal  sea  port  on 
the  Pacific  Coast  and  a  metropolis  which  had  the 
facilities  for  entertaining  great  multitudes.  In 
short  he  practically  reiterated  his  famous  dictum 
that  "San  Francisco  knows  how."  He  assured 
Mr.  Moore  that  he  was  still  interested  heart  and 
soul  in  the  success  of  the  Exposition,  and  would 
do  all  in  his  power  to  make  it  the  greatest  ever 
held  anywhere.  In  other  words,  for  all  the  effect 
the  political  situation  had  on  his  feelings,  the 
primary  might  never  have  occurred.  It  was  the 
letter  of  a  magnanimous  man.  I  hope  it  will  some 
day  see  the  light. 


Phelan  and  Bell 

The  Hon.  James  D.  Phelan  has  received  pretty 
rough  treatment  from  Woodrow  Wilson.  When 
Governor  Wilson  was  nominated  for  the  Presi- 
dency Mr.  Phelan's  large  and  sensitive  heart  was 
gladdened  with  the  expectation  of  being  chosen 
director-general  of  the  campaign  in  California. 
And  all  his  friends  conjectured  that  he  would 
be  so  honored,  and  they  hastened  to  felicitate 
him  on  the  happy  circumstances  that  made  him 
the  logical  man  for  the  post.  Also  they  rejoiced 
over  the  discomfiture  of  Theodore  Bell,  who, 
much  to  their  gratification,  backed  the  wrong 
man  at  Baltimore.  Now  fancy  their  subsequent 
state  of  mind  on  learning  that  Bell  had  beaten 
them  all  to  it,  as  it  were.  Naturally  there  was 
a  great  uproar  in  the  Phelan  camp.  Governor 
Wilson  has  been  hearing  from  home — Jimmy's. 


Rudolph  lias  been  burning  the  wires  with  pro- 
tests, and  all  the  Phelan  journals,  the  ncw>papers 
everywhere  that  look  forward  to  the  rich  harvest 
that  is  promised  w-hen  Jimmy  makes  his  fight 
for  the  Senate,  are  supplying  material  to  be  sent 
on  to  New  Jersey  in  the  interest  of  our  patriotic 
millionaire.  The  situation  is  really  lamentable. 
Mr.  Phelan,  his  friends  say,  regards  this  as  the 
psychological  year  for  the  Democracy  in  Cali- 
fornia. He  believes  that  with  the  Republicans 
split  there  is  a  chanc?  for  the  Democrats  to  cap- 
ture the  legislature  and  arrange  matters  to 
facilitate  his  ambitious  enterprise  later  on.  He 
docs  not  say  how  it  is  to  be  done,  but  he  has 
a  hunch  that  things  would  come  his  way  were 
Bel!  out  of  the  road.  Hence  the  swatting  of 
Bell  by  the  Phelanitcs. 


The  Call's  Innovation 

Certain  sentiments  recently  expressed  on  the 
Call's  editorial  page  the  Bulletin  w^as  pleased  1 1 
regard  as  conclusive  proof  of  the  Call's  betrayal 
of  the  people's  interests.  This  on  the  principle 
of  course  that  not  to  worship  the  Bulletin's  gods 
is  to  be  a  candidate  for  eternal  damnation.  But 
it  is  not  for  me  to  make  the  retort  courteous. 
.\nywa\'  that  little  matter  has  been  attended  to 
by  Phil  Francis,  himself  better  than  a  raw  hand 
in  .  discovering  the  joints  in  a  critic's  harness. 
What  I  wish  to  observe  is  that  all  newspapers 
might  vindicate  their  sincerity  as  defenders  of 
the  people's  interests  by  imitating  the  Call  in  its 
innovation  in  daily  jf)urnalism.  The  Call  now  de- 
votes its  editorial  page  to  the  comments  of  an 
individual.  What  you  read  on  that  page  you 
I  row  to  be  the  views  of  Phil  Frinci^  Th"  i"^" 
is  <TuiltIess  of  deception.  The  other  papers  prac- 
tice deception  every  day.  They  pretend  to  be 
or-icles.  There  is  something  of  impressive  mys- 
tery in  an  editorial  which  presumably  expresses 
public  opinion,  but  which  very  often  is  not  even 
the  opinion  of  the  person  who  wrote  it.  The 
editorial  page  is  a  breeder  of  bad  morals.  It 
corrupts  journalists  who  are  required  to  write  not 
what  they  think  but  what  they  are  ordered  to 
write.  Many  an  editorial  writer  would  be 
ashamed  to  sign  his  name  to  half  that  he  con- 
tributes to  the  editorial  page.  It  is  his  business 
to  invent  plausible  arguments  to  support  news- 
naper  policy,  and  newspaper  policy  is  often  noth- 
ing more  than  expediency  calculated  by  the  busi- 
ness manager  or  resulting  from  the  personal  in- 
terests of  the  proprietor.  The  Call's  innovation 
iherefore  is  in  the  interest  of  morals.  Phil  Fran- 
k's is  employed  by  the  Call  to  express  his  own 
views.  Whenever  the  Call's  policy  conflicts  with 
the  views  of  Phil  Francis  and  the  policy  is  to  be 
voiced  somebody  else  will  do  the  voicing. 


Reporters  at  the  Grove 

There  are  some  clubs  which  do  not  look  with 
kindly  eye  on  newspapermen.  The  reporter  is  not 
allowed  to  pass  the  sacred  portals  of  the  Pacific- 
Union  Club,  although  the  millionaire  newspaper 
proprietor  may  be  a  member,  the  reason  being  that 
the  reporter  has  the  "nose  for  news"  and  the 
proprietor  has  not.  Newspapermen  are  not  ex- 
cluded from  membership  in  the  Bohemian  Club, 
but  there  is  an  unwritten  rule  which  forbids  their 
reporting  club  doings.  Hence,  in  former  years, 
the  accounts  of  the  annual  grove  play  which  ap- 
peared in  the  papers  were  either  of  a  very  per- 
functory sort  or  else  were  based  on  the  published 
book  of  the  play.  This  is  to  be  changed  this 
year.  I  am  told  that  about  seventy-five  distin- 
guished Eastern  newspapermen  have  been  invited 
to  attend  the  Redding-Hadley  drama  "The  Atone- 
rnrnt  of  Pan"  with  the  understanding  that  they 
i-r^av  des-ribe  it  for  their  papers.  .So  the  praises 
of  Toe  Redding's  book  and  of  Henry  Hadley's 
music  will  be  widely  distributed,  even  if  a  little 


T.  B.  PON        J.   BERCnZ        C.  M.MLHEBUAU 
C.   LALANNE  L.  COUTARD 

Bergez  -  Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE  DOG 

CO. 

HOTEL  AND  RESTAURANT 

Music  and  Entertainment  Every  Evening 
415-421  BUSH  STREET  SAN  FRANCISCO 

(Above  Kearny) 
Exchange,  Douglas  2411 


LUNCH  75c  REGULAR  DINNER  $1.00 

Short  orders  at  all  hours.     Music  every  eTening. 
Banquet  Hall.    Seating;  Capacity  BOO. 


Techau  Tavern 

Cor.  Eddy  and  Powell  Streets 
SAN  FRANCISCO 

DougUi4700      PHONES:     Home  C  34 1 7 


A  High  CI  ass  Fami  ly  Cafe 

A  dainty  lunch  served  graluitoiuly  lo  ladiet  every 
day  during  shopping  hours,  between 
3:30  and  5:00  p.  m. 

UNDER  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF 

A.  C.  MORRISSON 


Jules  Restaurant 

Special  Lunchei  50c  or  a  la  Carte 
Ladies'  Grill  and  Rooms  for  Parties 

Regular  French  Dinner  with  Wine,  $1.00 

Vocal  and  Inatrumental  Music 

MONADNOCK  BUILDING 

NEXT  TO  PALACE  HOTEL 
Phone  Kearny  1812 
ALL  CARS  PASS  THE  DOOR       ELEVATOR  SERVICE 


FIOR  d'lTALIA 

RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN  DINNER  A  SPECIALTY 

The  cuisine  is  unsurpassed.    An  idt.l  place 
where  one  can  take  his  family  or  friends. 
Banquet  Rooms  and  Private  Rooms 

492  BROADWAY  ::  SAN  FRANCISCO 

Phones:  Douglas  I  S04        Home  C  1504 


August  3,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


i: 


exaggeration  lias  crept  in  and  the  Eastern  cor- 
respondents in  the  Bohemian  Grove  should  total 
less  than  seventy -five.  Perhaps  two  score  would 
be  a  more  reasonable  figure.  Undoubtedly  these 
newspaper  accounts,  together  with  the  perform- 
ance for  the  public  at  the  Greek  Theatre,  should 
facilitate  Joe  Redding's  work  in  having  the  drama 
produced  by  some  big  Eastern  manager.  But 
some  of  the  members  lament  that  the  spirit  of 
the  Grove  play  is  being  destroyed  by  all  this 
publicity. 


Lavish  Expenditures  and  Luxury 

There  is  a  story  that  when  the  Bohemian  Club 
was  founded,  the  charter  members  started  it  on  its 
career  by  getting  credit  for  the  rent  of  a  loft  and 
for  a  few  bottles  of  whiskey.  The  club  has  gone  a 
long  distance  away  from  that  early  simplicity  of 
poverty.  The  Grove  play  this  year  will  cost  the 
club  about  ten  thousand  dollars.  It  is  a  mytho- 
logical drama,  and  the  effects  needed  on  the  stage 
are  extremely  costly.  The  Bohemians  do  things 
thoroughly.  They  needed  a  statue  of  Diana  for 
"The  Atonement  of  Pan"  and  they  went  to  the 
best  sculptor  in  town  for  it — Haig  Patigian.  And 
so  on  throughout.  In  another  direction  the  lux- 
ury of  the  club  is  being  criticised  as  unjustifiable. 
This  is  with  regard  to  the  camps  maintained  in 
the  Grove  by  the  millionaire  and  near-millionaire 
members.  Some  of  these  camps  cost  thousancjs 
of  dollars.  They  are  furnished  not  merely  with 
comfort  but  with  finicky  elegance.  The  members 
bear  their  summer  outing  in  mind  when  they  are 
traveling  in  Europe  and  Asia,  and  bring  back  all 
sorts  of  impedimenta  for  their  tents.  If  old  Hor- 
ace who  was  a  genuine  Bohemian,  despite  his 
wealth,  could  see  some  of  the  camps  in  Bohemian 
Grove  he  would  quote  his  own  tag:  "Persicos  odi, 
puer,  apparatus."  The  Roman  camp  at  Capua 
couldn't  hold  a  candle  to  the  gilded  accommoda- 
tions which  some  of  the  Bohemian  sybarites  have 
provided  for  themselves. 


A  Word  to  Porter  Garnett 

To  continue  on  the  subject  of  the  Bohemian 
Grove  play  for  a  minute,  I  notice  that  Porter 
Garnett  is  now  on  the  stafT  of  the  Call,  doing  art 
criticisms  for  the  Sunday  paper.  This  gives  me 
an  idea.  Porter  Garnett  wrote  the  grove  play 
last  year.  Now  there  was  none  who  criticised 
"The  Green  Knight"  more  severely  than  Joe  Red- 
ding, the  author  of  this  year's  play.  His  ex-, 
pressions  of  disapproval  were  loud,  emphatic,  un- 
sympathetic. I  thought  at  the  time  that  Redding 
showed  rather  poor  taste,  considering  that  the 
man  who  wrote  the  "Natoma"  jingles  should  not 
forget  that  he  lives  in  a  glass  house  oiTering  an 
exceedingly  easy  mark  for  stones.  Now,  why 
shouldn't  Porter  Garnett  review  "The  Atonement 
of  Pan"  for  the  Call?  Why  shouldn't  he  give  it 
its  deserts,  whatever  they  may  prove  to  be,  speak- 
ing out  with  no  fear  and  no  favor?    Tit  for  tat  is 


the  rule,  you  know!  This  suggestion  is  offered  to 
Garnett  and  to  the  Call  in  good  feeling.  And  if 
the  Call  does  not  see  fit  to  depute  Garnett  to  re- 
view the  play,  the  columns  of  Town  Talk  will  be 
open  to  him  for  that  purpose. 


and  Missourians  who  want  to  be  shown  what  was 
done  with  the  fund. 


A  Ferry  Apollo 

"I  see,"  said  the  man  who  winds  the  ferry 
clock,  "that  they  have  a  new  matinee  idol  at  the 
Alcazar  and  that  he  has  made  a  great  stir  among 
the  ladies.  I  haven't  seen  him,  but  I'll  bet  a 
month's  salary  against  a  boat-hook  that  our  deck- 
hand has  him  lashed  to  the  mast  for  manly 
beauty.  Ever  see  him — the  deckhand?"  I  had 
never  had  the  pleasure.  "Well  he's  a  beaut," 
said  the  man  who  keeps  tab  on  the  clock.  "The 
commuters  are  crazy  about  him — 1  mean  the 
skirted  ones.  They  just  stand  round  and  admire 
him.  I  heard  some  of  them  say  he  was  a  sure 
enough  Apollo.  He's  a  husky,  and  he  looks  just 
like  a  statue  I've  seen  out  in  the  Park  Museum. 
There  are  some  teachers  that  travel  on  the  boats 
who  are  all  in  a  flutter  about  him.  They've 
talked  to  me  about  him.  They  think  he's  a 
foreign  count  incog.  They  saw  him  on  the  street 
one  day,  and  he  was  togged  out  in  stylish  clothes, 
wore  a  straw  hat  and  didn't  look  like  a  deckhand 
at  all.  They  bowed  to  him  just  for  fun  and  lie 
gave  them  a  regular  stage  bow,  almost  sweeping 
the  sidewalk  with  the  straw  lid.  I  don't  mind 
telling  you  low  down  that  travel  on  the  boats  has 
increased  since  our  Apollo  showed  up." 


Money  Troubles  in  the  Unions 

The  McNamara  fund  is  the  bone  of  contention 
in  many  of  the  unions  of  the  State,  if  rumors  can 
be  believed.  It  is  said  that  in  Stockton  the  dis- 
cussion as  to  what  was  done  with  the  immense 
fund  collected  has  resulted  in  a  split.  Fourteen 
unions  will  not  affiliate  any  longer  with  the  State 
lUiilding  Trades  Council,  it  is  said,  until  that  in- 
stitution publishes  a  correct  list  of  moneys  gath- 
ered and  gives  a  detailed  account  of  expenditures. 
There  seems  to  be  much  bad  blood  over  the  mat- 
ter, but  those  demanding  a  strict  accounting  are 
firm  and  seem  to  be  in  a  large  majority  over  those 
who  favor  the  Tveitmoe-McCarthy  regime.  If  re- 
ports are  true  there  remain  but  four  unions  in 
Stockton  giving  allegiance  to  the  State  central 
body.  It  is  said  to  be  only  a  question  of  time 
when  the  unions  in  Oakland  are  going  to  take 
similar  steps  but  for  a  different  reason.  The  long 
continued  fight  against  the  Sunset  Lumber  Com- 
pany has  drained  the  men  in  the  millmen's  unions 
about  dry  and  long  ago  other  unions  stopped  con- 
tributing to  the  fund.  The  money  collected  was 
no  small  amount  and  here  again  are  grumblers 

TIPO  (RED  OR  WHITE) 

produced  only  by  the  Italian-Swiss  Colony,  is 
California's  most  popular  table  wine.  For  sale 
everywhere. 


TeUphone  Kearnjr  11 


Armor  Plate  Safe  Deposit  Vaults 

OF  UNION  SAFE  DEPOSIT  COMPANY  IN  BUILDING  OF 

Union  Trust  Company 
=  of  San  Francisco  = 

JUNCTION  OF 

MARKET  and  O'FARRELL  STS. 
and  GRANT  AVE. 

Largest,  Strongett  and  Most  Conveniently 
Arranged  Safe  Deposit  West  of  New  York 

BOXES  $4.00  PER  ANNUM  AND  UPWARDS 


A  Chance  for  Hays  Hammond 

John  Hays  Hammond,  otherwise  known  as 
"Jack  the  Nudger"  because  he  once  poked  King 
George  V.  in  the  ribs,  had  better  get  busy.  His 
services  may  be  needed  in  London,  as  may  be  also 
the  services  of  our  Ambassador  to  the  Court  of  St. 
James,  Whitelaw  Reid.  A  very  serious  situation 
may  arise  in  London.  It  may  be  serious  for  the 
whole  United  States,  but  particularly  serious  for 
San  Francisco.  If  Hays  Hammond  who  was  re- 
cently our  Panama-Pacific  Exposition  Envoy  ex- 
traordinary to  the  capitals  of  Europe  will  join 
hands  with  Ambassador  Reid,  a  complication 
which  would  be  very  awkward  for  us  may  be 
avoided.  It  is  this — London  is  planning  to  have 
a  Fair  in  1915.  Just  why  the  year  of  the  open- 
ing of  the  Canal  was  chosen  does  not  appear. 
Perhaps  the  Londoners  are  as  eager  as  we  are  to 
take  advantage  of  the  flood  of  travel  eastward 
and  westward  which  will  surely  distinguish  that 
year.  But  anyway  London  plans  an  Exposition 
for  1915,  and  Hays  Hammond  and  Whitelaw 
Reid  ought  to  get  busy  right  away  and  find  put 
whether  there  is  any  way  to  have  London  change 
that  plan. 


Not  a  World's  Fair 

This  exposition  which  is  to  be  held  in  London 
in  1915  will  not  be  a  World's  Fair.  To  that  ex- 
tent it  will  not  enter  into  competition  with  the 
World's  Fair  in  San  Francisco.  London's  is  to 
be  an  "imperial  exposition,"  that  is  to  say,  it  is 
to  do  for  the  British  Empire  what  a  World's  Fair 


THE  PERFECTION  OF  WHISKEY 
QUALITY  IS  ALWAYS  FOUND  IN 

HUNTER 


BALTIMORE 


RYE 


THE 

AMERICAN  GENTLEMAN'S 
WHISKEY 


.Sold  al  all  first-class  cafes  and  by  jobbers 
WM    LAN.MI.AN  &  SON,  Baltimore.  Md. 


HAMMOCKS 

We  have  an  overstock  and  will  sacrifice  these 
Hammocks  at  a  very  low  price.  We  are  making  a 
specialty  of  Blue  and  White  Canvas  Striped  Ham- 
mocks at  $1.25  each. 

WEEKS-HOWE- EMERSON  COMPANY 

51  Market  Street      San  Francisco 


TOWN  TALK 


August  3,  1912 


does  for  the  world.  All  the  countries,  all  the 
provinces,  all  the  possessions  and  all  the  depend- 
encies of  the  Empire  on  which  the  sun  never  sets 
will  be  represented  by  exhibitions  in  the  London 
Fair  of  191S.  Every  effort  will  be  made  to  bring 
large  numbers  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  various 
sections  of  the  Empire  together  in  a  social  way 
so  as  to  make  them  better  acquainted  and  enable 
them  better  to  appreciate  and  understand  one  an- 
other. A  comprehensive  prospectus  of  the  ex- 
position is  now  being  prepared,  to  be  submitted 
to  the  oversea  governments  with  the  view  of  ob- 
taining their  co-operation.  One  great  feature 
will  be  a  historic  illustration  of  the  progress  of 
the  Empire  at  home  and  abroad  in  industry  and 
science.  The  various  exhibits  will  show  the  ad- 
vances made  in  land  and  sea  methods  of  travel 
and  in  steam  traffic  and  electric  communication. 


The  Men  In  Charge 

A  large  committee  of  which  Lord  Strathcona  is 
chairman,  has  taken  up  the  project  and  sub- 
scribed $25,000  toward  a  guarantee  fund  of 
$150,000  to  protect  the  exhibitors  and  managers 
against  loss.  Although  the  minimum  of  this 
fund  is  placed  at  $150,000,  it  is  hoped  that  it  will 
reach  $250,000.  The  Royal  Colonial  Institute  is 
backing  the  enterprise  which  has  already  taken 
such  definite  shape  that  a  contract  has  been  made 
with  the  owners  of  Earls  Court  for  the  use  of 
their  buildings  and  grounds.  The  committee  in 
charge  numbers  167  and  includes  the  Duke  of 
Marlborough,  the  Earl  of  Carrick,  Earl  of  Derby, 
Earl  of  Plymouth,  Earl  of  Selborne,  Viscount 
Hill,  Lord  Avebury ,  Lord  Desborough,  Lord 
Furness,  Lord  Leamington,  Lord  Pirrie,  Sir  Beer- 
bohm  Tree,  Sir  James  Dewar,  Sir  Gilbert  Parker 
and  many  members  of  Parliament.  High  com- 
missioners and  agents  in  all  the  British  dominions 
are  co-operating.    No  large  amount  will  be  spent 


in  buildings,  the  intention  of  the  committee  being 
to  devote  most  of  the  money  collected  to  gather- 
ing such  a  wealth  of  products  of  all  parts  of  the 
Empire  as  to  make  the  display  thoroughly  repre- 
sentative. 


Dangerous  Competition 

this  may  mean  dangerous  competition  for 
us.  If  so,  what  are  we  going  to  do  about  it? 
Are  we  to  accept  London's  competition,  or  shall 
we  take  steps  to  forestall  it?  I  asked  some  of 
the  Panama-Pacific  officials  what  they  thought  of 
this  project,  and  they  made  light  of  it.  One  of 
them  said  it  was  a  Kiralfy  enterprise,  and  no  more 
to  be  feared  by  San  Francisco  than  a  cattle  show 
or  an  automobile  exhibition.  He  explained  that 
the  noblemen  mentioned  lent  their  names  because 
they  are  heavy  stockholders  in  street  car  lines 
and  other  enterprises  which  benefit  by  any  sort 
of  show  at  Earls  Court.  Another  official  of  the 
Fair  explained  that  the  whole  matter  had  been 
investigated  by  Ambassador  Reid  with  the  as- 
sistance of  Sir  Robert  Balfour  who  was  interested 
from  this  end  by  the  Balfour-Guthrie  people,  and 
that  the  Ambassador's  opinion  was  that  San  Fran- 
cisco had  nothing  to  fear  in  the  way  of  competi- 
tion. Still,  you  never  can  tell.  It's  just  as  well 
to  keep  your  eyes  open.  We  don't  want  any  com- 
petition from  London  if  we  can  help  it.  It  w^ould 
be  well  to  put  Hays  Hammond  on  the  job. 


Official  Condolence  for  the  Mikado 

When  news  was  received  in  San  Francisco  that 
the  Mikado  was  dead,  the  officials  of  the  Panama- 
Pacific  Exposition  thought  that  the  proper  thing 
for  them  to  do  was  to  drop  in  on  the  Jap- 
anese Commissioners  who  are  here  to  choose  the 
site  for  the  Japanese  building.  But  they  were 
ignorant  of  the  etiquette  for  such  cases  made  and 
provided.  Happily,  however,  there  was  a  man  on 
the  job  who  knew  the  proper  procedure.  This 
was  Lieutenant-Commander  Sellers  who  was  de- 
tailed recently  by  the  Secretary  of  the  Navy  to 
act  as  President  C.  C.  Moore's  naval  aide.  Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Sellers  explained  that  the  first 
thing  to  do  was  to  put  the  American  and  Japanese 
flags  at  half-mast.  The  next  step  was  to  cable 
Ambassador  Calhoun  in  Tokio  to  express  regrets 
to  the  members  of  the  royal  family  on  behalf  of 
the  President  of  the  World's  Fair.  Then  he 
armed  himself  with  the  cards  of  the  President  and 
other  officials  and  paid  a  ceremonious  visit  to  the 
Japanese  Commissioners.  When  he  was  received 
he  expressed  the  condolences  of  the  directorate  in 
the  most  formal  language.  The  reply  was  just 
as  formal.  When  he  reported  at  Exposition  head- 
quarters, Charles  C.  Moore  breathed  freely  with 
a  consciousness  that  no  demand  of  internatii rnal 
courtesy  had  been  ignored. 


Is  There  a  "System"? 

When  George  Kibbe  Turner,  and  later  .-Mfred 
Henry  Lewis,  wrote  magazine  articles  to  demon- 
strate that  vice  and  crime  were  highly  organized 
in  New  York  most  of  us  supposed  that  they  had 
heightened  their  narratives  with  exaggerations  and 
stretching  of  the  truth  to  make  the  articles  lurid 
and  sensational.  And  yet  several  of  the  crooks 
and  gun-men  whom  Turner  and  Lewis  described 
by  name   figured  in   the   remarkable  Rosenthal 


case.  The  revelations  which  led  to  the  identifica- 
tion of  the  men  who  rode  in  the  gray  ''murder 
car'  and  to  the  indictment  and  arrest  of  Lieutenant 
Becker  have  helped  to  convince  many  that  or- 
ganization of  law-breakers  in  New  York's  Alsatia 
is  no  figment  of  the  muckraker's  imagination. 
That  there  was  such  organization  in  earlier  days 
was  demonstrated  when  Senator  Lexow  and  his 
investigating  committee  tore  the  lid  off  the  Tend- 
erloin and  the  East  Side,  showing  that  a  partner- 
ship for  profit  existed  between  certain  politicians, 
policemen  and  criminals.  The  same  thing  was 
proved  later  on  by  the  Mazet  investigation.  Why 
should  conditions  be  different  today?  It  cer- 
tainly looks  as  though  there  is  a  "system." 


The  Fate  of  Informers 

It  has  always  gone  hard  with  informers  like 
Rosenthal  in  New  York.  A  number  of  years  ago 
one  McAuliffe  peached  on  the  police.  He  was  ar- 
rested on  a  charge  of  intoxication,  though  it  was 
said  he  did  not  drink,  and  locked  up  in  the  sta- 
tion-house. The  next  morning  he  was  picked  up 
unconscious  and  dying  many  blocks  from  the 
lock-up.    The   investigation   which   followed  did 


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August  3,  1912 


TOWN  TALK 


13 


not  clear  up  the  mystery.  In  1904  Bill  O'Brien, 
a  burglar,  helped  convict  a  policeman  of  murder. 
Thirteen  days  later  O'Brien  was  shot  and  dan- 
gerously wounded.  "I  was  a  fool  to  monkey 
with  the  police,"'  said  O'Brien;  "I  got  it  and  got 
it  good."  He  refused  to  tell  who  shot  him.  In 
the  same  year  a  thief  named  Lefty  Boyle  squealed 
on  the  policeman  who  was  protecting  his  opera- 
tions and  taking  part  of  his  swag.  Just  before 
the  policeman's  trial  was  to  begin  Lefty  Boyle, 
the  only  man  whose  testimony  could  convict  him; 
was  killed  by  a  Tenderloin  pick-pocket.  These 
are  a  few  instances  which  should  have  gone  to 
show  the  unfortunate  Rosenthal  that  it  is  fatal  to 
"monkey  with  the  police." 


Praise  for  Sir  Arthur 

The  production  of  the  Gilbert  and  Sullivan 
operas  here  reminds  me  of  a  story  which  Sir 
Arthur  Sullivan  used  to  tell  with  great  gusto, 
always  claiming  that  it  was  the  greatest  compli- 
ment he  had  ever  received.  Many  years  ago  the 
famous  composer  had  a  sister  living  at  Santa  Bar- 
bara. She  died,  and  the  great  musician  journeyed 
from  London  to  close  up  her  estate.  He  was 
sitting  alone  one  day  in  the  bar  of  the  old  Arling- 
ton Hotel  at  Santa  Barbara  when  a  cowboy 
clattered  in,  pistol  at  hip  and  spur  on  heel.  Some- 
body whispered  to  the  cowboy  that  the  stranger 
sitting  alone  was  the  great  composer.  Im- 
mediately the  roughneck  went  up  to  Sir  Arthur, 
and  said:  "Say,  are  you  the  feller  that  put 
'Pinafore'  together?"  "Yes,"  was  the  answer. 
"Well,"  rejoined  the  cowboy  with  a  voice  full  of 
admiration,  "I  wish  you'd  take  a  drink  with  me." 
And  Sir  Arthur  did. 


"Pen  Portraits"  in  '78 

There  has  just  come  into  my  hands  an  interest- 
ing bit  of  CaHforiana,  a  thin  blue  book  called 
"Pen  Portraits"  compiled  in  1878  by  R.  R.  Park- 
inson. It  contains  brief  notices  of  the  members 
of  the  Legislature  of  '77-'78.  Its  principal  inter- 
est for  us  of  today  lies  in  checking  up  the 
prophecies  of  success  which  Parkinson  made 
thirty-four  years  ago  for  men  who  are  still  alive. 
Thus  we  learn  that  the  Hon.  James  V.  Coffey  (his 
name  alas!  is  spelled  Coffee)  is  "a  very  able  and 
promising  young  man."  Also  that  "he  is  slimly 
built;  small  stature;  has  sandy,  curly  hair,  and 
a  smooth,  priestly-looking  face."  Judge  Coffey 
was  an  assemblyman.  Of  Assemblyman  John  T. 
Dare  we  also  learn  that  he  is  "promising"  and 
"will  be  heard  from  again  in  the  future  delibera- 
tions of  the  State."  He  is  credited  with  "moder- 
ate ambition."  Of  Grove  Johnson  we  read  this: 
"His  popularity  in  his  own  county  is  fast  increas- 
ing, and  by  inevitable  destiny  it  will  spread  to  the 
very  confines  of  the  State.  He  is  fast  climbing 
the  ladder  of  preferment  and,  if  we  are  good 
guessers,  he  will  yet  become  one  of  our  most 
prominent  citizens."  Even  in  those  days,  it 
seems.  Grove  always  wore  "an  exquisite  nosegay 
in  his  coat."  Assemblyman  Samuel  W.  Backus 
was  then  "well  and  favorably  known  as  the  gen- 
tlemanly agent  of  the  Oregon  Steamship  Com- 
pany." He  was  "smart,  sprightly,  intelligent; 
neither  tall  nor  robust."  John  A.  Hicks  was  "a 
young  man  of  intelligence;  and  by  industry  and 
application  will  make  his  mark  in  the  future." 
The  only  newspaperman  in  that  Legislature  who 
is  still  in  harness  is  John  Paul  Cosgrave,  then  of 
the  Globe  but  now  of  the  Chronicle.  Cosgrave 
is  described  as  "one  of  those  bright  luminaries 
who  make  rogues  tremble  by  the  shake  of  the  pen 
more  than  warriors  do  by  a  thrust  of  the  sword; 
of  the  class  who,  oft-times  despised,  are  the  con- 
trollers of  society  and  the  masters  of  millionaires." 


Collaboration  in  the  Woods 

In  the  shaded  recesses  of  the  mountains  of 


Mendocino  county  hard  by  the  little  hamlet  of 
Longvale,  two  members  of  the  Press  Club  may  be 
noticed  next  month  by  the  casual  hunter  or 
pedestrian,  engaged  in  mysterious  gesticulations 
and  declamations  suggestive  of  the  mad  house. 
The  wondering  hoot  owl  and  the  startled  chip- 
munk will  alike  be  treated  to  a  display  of  the 
gamut  of  human  emotions  which  these  two  strange 
humans  will  offer  to  the  listening  pines  the  while 
a  long  suffering  stenographer  hurriedly  plucks 
the  words  from  the  wood-scented  air  and  con- 
verts them  into  the  material  form,  of  lead  and 
paper.  Lest  some  member  of  the  Press  Club 
chance  to  stumble  across  this  scene  it  maj'  per- 
haps save  him  a  shock  to  be  warned  that  it  is 
merely  Pete  Kyne,  the  short  story  writer,  and 
Frank  Morse  of  the  Call  trying  to  break  into 
the  playwright  game,  and  that  aside  from  this, 
there  is  really  nothing  serious  the  matter  with 
them  physically  or  mentally.  For  some  months 
these  two  have  been  evolving  a  drama  of  western 
mining  camp  life  based  on  a  short  story  which 
Kyne  has  sold  to  the  Saturday  Evening  Post. 
The  possibilities  of  the  story  as  a  play  were 
pointed  out  to  Kyne  by  a  well  known  theatrical 
manager  who  was  enthusiastic  over  the  dramatic 
situations  presented.  Kyne's  work  in  the  short 
stfiry  line  is  known  to  thousands  of  readers  all 
over  the  country.  The  selection  of  Morse  as  a 
collaborator  was  due  to  his  intimate  knowledge  of 
the  mining  camp  life,  the  Call  man  having  lived 
four  years  in  the  Nevada  desert  during  the  early 
gold  days  of  that  region.  He  was  also  president 
of  the  Princeton  University  dramatic  association 
during  his  college  days  and  collaborated  with 
Booth  Tarkington  in  a  number  of  the  plays  pro- 
duced by  that  college  organization. 


A  Play  Without  a  Villain 

Our  dear  old  friend  Makepeace  Thackeray 
achieved  the  novel  without  a  hero  when  he  wrote 
"Vanity  Fair."  Now  Kyne  and  Morse  are  going 
to  essay  a  play  without  a  villain.  There  is  to  be 
no  dastard  in  their  drama.  The  emotions  which 
will  clash  to  make  the  dramatic  action  will  be 
without  exception  emotions  of  a  kindly  or  noble 
sort.  The  meaner  passions  that  have  been  dis- 
played in  other  plays  will  be  absent.  Every  char- 
acter will  be  "on  the  square"  with  every  other 
character.  This  sounds  like  an  attempt  to  dram- 
atize an  ideal  existence  which  never  was,  but 
Kyne  and  Morse  insist  that  the  thing  can  be  done. 
In  fact,  they  say  the  thing  is  already  done.  Like 
Oscar  Wilde,  when  asked  about  "Salome,"  they 
say  their  play  is  finished — all  they  have  to  do 
now  is  to  write  it. 


It  Was  Not  Sheridan 

No,  omnivorous  reader,  it  was  not  Sheridan 
who  made  the  remark  which  I  have  just  assigned 
to  Oscar  Wilde.  I  am  aware  that  you  saw  it 
attributed  to  Richard  Brinsley  in  a  recent  inter- 
view one  of  our  dramatic  critics  had  with  May 
Tully,  but  that  was  a  slip.  Sheridan  didn't  write 
his  plays  so  methodically.  If  he  did  they  would 
probably  have  been  produced  on  time.  I  recall 
reading  somewhere  that  he  sat  in  the  wings  at 
Drury  Lane  and  wrote  the  last  half  of  the  fifth 
act  of  "Pizarro"  while  the  company  were  actually 
playing  the  first  act.  Needless  to  say,  the  per- 
formance was  not  a  howling  success — neither  was 
the  play. 


Fair  Maid — I  wonder  what  causes  the  flight 
of  time? 

Brilliant  Young  Man — It  is  probably  urged  on 
by  the  spur  of  the  moment. 


"Did  her  wedding  go  off  without  a  hitch?" 
"It  did,  indeed!    The  man  she  was  going  to 
marry  did  not  show  up!" 


Truly  Noble 

Fair  Millionaire — Oh,  Vladimir,  they  say  you 
are  a  fortune-hunter,  and  are  only  marrying  me 
for  my  wealth.    Tell  me  that  this  is  not  true. 

Lord  Dedbroke — Why,  my  dearest,  I  would 
marry  you  if  you  were  penniless. 

Fair  Millionaire — Prove  this,  my  own  Vladimir, 
and  I  shall  be  absolutely  happy. 

Lord  Dedbroke- — Settle  the  whole  of  your  vast 
fortune  upon  me,  leaving  yourself  destitute,  and 
I  will  wed  you  in  the  face  of  the  whole  world. 


The 

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71   FIRST  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
CAL. 


14 


TOWN  TALK 


August  3.  '.912 


Social  Prattle 


By  TANTALUS 


The  Wedding  Pictures 

All  the  guests  who  were  present  at  tlie  wedding 
breakfast  of  Mrs.  Malcolm  Whitman  are  to  be 
presented  with  a  picture  of  the  feast.  It  will  be 
remembered  that  the  only  pictures  taken  on  that 
day  with  the  exception  of  a  few  unsatisfactory 
ones  surreptitiously  obtained  at  the  expense  of 
great  exertion  and  ingenuity,  were  those  ordered 
specially  for  Mrs.  Whitman  and  taken  by  a  pro- 
fessional photographer.  She  is  having  duplicates 
made  and  will  present  every  guest  with  a  copy. 
One  enterprising  photographer  on  that  day  had 
secreted  himself  carefully  in  the  bushes  and  was 
walking  out  of  the  grounds  with  dozens  of  beau- 
tiful views  when  a  burly  policeman  grabbed  him 
and  exposed  the  plates  to  the  sun. 


A  Tribute  to  Mrs.  Whitman 

Speaking  of  these  wedding  picture;,  I  had  an 
interesting  talk  the  other  day  with  the  photog- 
rapher who  took  them.  He  paid  Mrs.  Malcolm 
Whitman  a  high  compliment.  "I  have  taken  the 
pictures,"  he  said,  "of  a  great  many  women  who 
occupy  assured  places  in  society  and  of  a  great 
many  more  who  are  still  struggling  for  a  foot- 
ing. Mrs.  Whitman  is  the  sweetest,  the  gentlest, 
the  most  considerate,  the  least  self-conscious  of 
them  all.  When  I  went  to  the  wedding  to  super- 
vise the  taking  of  the  pictures  she  treated  mc 
as  nicely  as  any  of  the  wedding  guests.  Her  at- 
titude was  very  diflferent  from  that  of  many  whom 
I  have  photographed.  The  climbers  are  the 
v.orst.  They  always  insist  on  considering  me  a 
servant,  a  little  more  advanced  than  a  waiter  but 
not  nearly  as  important  as  a  groom.  And  they 
are  exceedingly  hard  to  please.  Some  in  fact  are 
never  pleased — at  least  they  never  admit  it.  Be- 
lieve me,  a  photograph  gallery  is  the  place  to 
study  human  nature.  And  if  you  knew  what  I 
know,  your  opinion  of  some  of  our  so-called 
prominent  women  would  be  changed." 


The  Whitman